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Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary (2014)

Chapter: Appendix B: Meeting Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
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Appendix B

Meeting Agenda

Health Literacy and Numeracy: A Workshop

Keck 100
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC

July 18, 2013 OPEN SESSION Room 100

8:30–8:40

Welcome and Introduction of First Two Speakers

Paul Schyve, M.D.

Senior Advisor

The Joint Commission

8:40–9:50

An Overview of Numeracy

8:40–9:00

What Is Numeracy?: It’s More Than Mathematics

Lynda Ginsburg, Ph.D.

Department of Mathematics

Rutgers University

9:00–9:20

Presentation of Commissioned Paper. This presentation will cover (1) what research shows about people’s numeracy skill levels; (2) what kinds of numeracy skills are needed in health, e.g., selecting a health plan, choosing treatments, and understanding medication instructions; and (3) what we know about how providers should communicate with those with low numeracy skills.

Ellen Peters, Ph.D.

Department of Psychology

Ohio State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×

9:20–9:50

Discussion

9:50–9:55

Introduction of Speaker

9:55–10:15

Are Numeracy Issues More Difficult with Poor Health?

Terry Davis, Ph.D.

Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport

10:15–10:30

Discussion

10:30–10:45

BREAK

10:45–10:55

Introduction of Exercise and Panel Speakers

10:55–11:00

Deconstruction Exercise

Rima Rudd, Sc.D., M.S.P.H.

Department of Society, Human Development, and Health

Harvard School of Public Health

11:00–12:15

Numeracy Demands, Assumptions, and Challenges for Consumers. These presentations will go into more detail than background overview for each area identified.

11:00–11:20

Choosing a Health Plan (will begin with a short video)

Lynn Quincy, M.S.

Senior Policy Analyst

Consumers Union

11:20–11:40

Numeracy in Health Care

Andrea Apter, M.D., M.A., M.Sc.

Professor of Medicine

University of Pennsylvania

11:40–12:15

Discussion

12:15–1:30

MEMBER and SPEAKER LUNCH

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×

1:30–1:40

Introduction of Panel

1:40–3:00

Panel: Numeracy Demands, Assumptions, and Challenges for Communicators. These presentations will go into more detail than background overview for each area identified.

1:40–2:00

Issues and Challenges Related to Journalism. This presentation will focus on how news organizations convey numerical information.

Marguerite Holloway, M.S.

Assistant Professor

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

2:00–2:20

Issues and Challenges in the Era of Shared Decision Making: Explaining Risk and Uncertainty

Jessica S. Ancker, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Assistant Professor

Weill Cornell Medical College

2:20–3:00

Discussion

3:00–3:15

BREAK

3:15–3:25

Introduction of Panel Presenters

3:25–4:45

Panel: Effective Strategies

3:25–3:45

Examples of Effective Display of Health Plan Information

Robert M. Krughoff, J.D.

President, Center for the Study of Services

Consumers’ CHECKBOOK

3:45–4:05

Communicating Quantitative Information for Decision Making

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, School of Public Health

University of Michigan

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×

4:05–4:25

Effectively Communicating Medication Instructions

Michael Wolf, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Associate Professor

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

4:25–4:45

Discussion

4:45–4:55

Exercise Results

4:55–5:30

Reflections on the Day

5:30

ADJOURN

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×
Page 138
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18660.
×
Page 140
Next: Appendix C: Speaker Biosketches »
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Although health literacy is commonly defined as an individual trait, it does not depend on the skills of individuals alone. Health literacy is the product of the interaction between individuals' capacities and the health literacy-related demands and complexities of the health care system. Specifically, the ability to understand, evaluate, and use numbers is important to making informed health care choices.

Health Literacy and Numeracy is the summary of a workshop convened by The Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy in July 2013 to discuss topics related to numeracy, including the effects of ill health on cognitive capacity, issues with communication of health information to the public, and communicating numeric information for decision making. This report includes a paper commissioned by the Roundtable, "Numeracy and the Affordable Care Act: Opportunities and Challenges," that discusses research findings about people's numeracy skill levels; the kinds of numeracy skills that are needed to select a health plan, choose treatments, and understand medication instructions; and how providers should communicate with those with low numeracy skills. The paper was featured in the workshop and served as the basis of discussion.

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