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Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop (2014)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

Appendix B

Workshop Agenda and Participant List

Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate
and
Polar Research Board
Linkages Between Arctic Sea Ice Loss and Mid‐Latitude Weather Patterns

September 12‐13, 2013

Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center
University of Maryland
5825 University of Maryland Research Park
College Park, MD 20740

Workshop Goals

Rising global average temperatures, and especially intense warming in the northern polar regions, are leading to a rapid loss of the sea ice cap that covers the Arctic ocean. Emerging research may indicate that large losses of Arctic sea ice cover can have dramatic impacts upon weather patterns across the heavily populated northern mid‐latitudes, and that such impacts could increase as ice cover continues to retreat in the coming decades. The workshop will address the following questions:

 

  • What do we currently understand about the mechanisms that link declines in Arctic sea ice cover, loss of high‐latitude snow cover, changes in Arctic-region energy fluxes, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the occurrence of extreme weather events?
  • What may be the possible implications of more severe loss (and eventually, total loss) of summer Arctic sea ice upon weather patterns at lower latitudes?
  • What are the major gaps in our understanding, and what sort of observational and/or modeling efforts are needed to fill those gaps?
  • What are the current opportunities and limitations for using Arctic sea ice predictions to assess the risk of temperature/precipitation anomalies and extreme weather events over northern continents? How might these capabilities improve over time?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

Thursday, September 12, 2013

OPEN SESSION: 9:00 A.M.–5:30 P.M.

 

9:00 A.M. Welcome, Introduction, Purpose of Workshop David Robinson
Rutgers University

Session 1
Big picture context: The role of Arctic sea ice loss vs. other forcing factors

 

9:15 A.M. James Screen, University of Exeter
  Elizabeth Barnes, Colorado State University
  Paul Kushner, University of Toronto
   
12:00 P.M. Lunch
   
1:00 P.M. Open panel session for workshop participants

Session 2
Observational evidence of linkages

 

1:30 P.M. Jennifer Francis, Rutgers University
  Steve Feldstein, Pennsylvania State University
  James Overland, NOAA
  John Gyakum, McGill University
   
5:00 P.M. Open panel session for workshop participants
   
5:30 P.M. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

Friday, September 13, 2013

OPEN SESSION: 8:30 A.M.–3:00 P.M.

Session 3
Theoretical and modeling work

 

8:30 A.M. Dargan Frierson, University of Washington
  Gudrun Magnusdottir, University of California, Irvine
  Marika Holland, NCAR
   
11:15 A.M. Open panel session for workshop participants
   
12:00 P.M. Working lunch in breakout groups

Session 4
Breakout group discussions

Where do we go from here? What are the major gaps in our understanding, and what observational and modeling efforts are needed to fill those gaps?

 

1:45 P.M. Breakout groups present their findings
   
3:00 P.M. Workshop adjourns
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

Linkages Between Arctic Sea Ice Loss and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns

September 12-13, 2013

Participant List

 

•   Anjuli Bamzai, NSF

•   Elizabeth (Libby) Barnes, Colorado State University

•   Uma Bhatt, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

•   Cecilia Bitz, University of Washington

•   Lance Bosart, University at Albany/SUNY

•   David Bromwich, Ohio State University

•   Tony Busalacchi, University of Maryland

•   Richard (Rit) Carbone, NCAR

•   Jessie Carman, NOAA

•   Judah Cohen, Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER)

•   Kathleen Crane, NOAA

•   Ed Dunlea, NRC

•   Benjamin DeAngelo, EPA

•   Clara Deser, NCAR

•   Ian Eisenman, University of California, San Diego

•   Daniel Eleuterio, US Navy

•   Steve Feldstein, Pennsylvania State University

•   Jennifer Francis, Rutgers University

•   Dargan Frierson, University of Washington

•   Rita Gaskins, NRC

•   Laurie Geller, NRC

•   Rob Greenway, NRC

•   Michael Gremillion, US Air Force

•   John Gyakum, McGill University

•   Greg Hakim, University of Washington

•   Wayne Higgins, NOAA

•   Sam Higuchi, NASA

•   Martin Hoerling, NOAA

•   Marika Holland, NCAR

•   Fiona Horsfall, NWS

•   Paul Houser, George Mason University

•   Brendan Kelly, OSTP

•   Paul Kushner, University of Toronto

•   Michelle L’Heureux, NOAA

•   Arthur Lee, Chevron

•   David Lorenz, University of Wisconsin

•   Gudrun Magnusdottir, University of California, Irvine

•   Walter Meier, NASA

•   Matt Newman, University of Colorado

•   J. Jerome Montague, Alaskan Command

•   Jim Overland, NOAA

•   Amanda Purcell, NRC

•   Susan Roberts, NRC

•   David Robinson, Rutgers University

•   James Screen, University of Exeter

•   Amanda Staudt, NWF

•   Julienne Stroeve, NSIDC

•   Katie Thomas, NRC

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

•   Steve Tracton, Washington Post

•   Jinro Ukita, Niigata University

•   Stephen Vavrus, University of Wisconsin

•   Tom Wagner, NASA

•   John Walsh, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

•   Wanqiu Wang, NOAA

•   Tim Woollings, Reading University

•   Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona

•   Rong Zhang, NOAA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Participant List." National Research Council. 2014. Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18727.
×
Page 64
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The Arctic has been undergoing significant changes in recent years. Average temperatures are rising twice as fast as they are elsewhere in the world. The extent and thickness of sea ice is rapidly declining. Such changes may have an impact on atmospheric conditions outside the region. Several hypotheses for how Arctic warming may be influencing mid-latitude weather patterns have been proposed recently. For example, Arctic warming could lead to a weakened jet stream resulting in more persistent weather patterns in the mid-latitudes. Or Arctic sea ice loss could lead to an increase of snow on high-latitude land, which in turn impacts the jet stream resulting in cold Eurasian and North American winters. These and other potential connections between a warming Arctic and mid-latitude weather are the subject of active research.

Linkages Between Arctic Warming and Mid-Latitude Weather Patterns is the summary of a workshop convened in September 2013 by the National Research Council to review our current understanding and to discuss research needed to better understand proposed linkages. A diverse array of experts examined linkages between a warming Arctic and mid-latitude weather patterns. The workshop included presentations from leading researchers representing a range of views on this topic. The workshop was organized to allow participants to take a global perspective and consider the influence of the Arctic in the context of forcing from other components of the climate system, such as changes in the tropics, ocean circulation, and mid-latitude sea surface temperature. This report discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms that link declines in Arctic sea ice cover, loss of high-latitude snow cover, changes in Arctic-region energy fluxes, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the occurrence of extreme weather events; possible implications of more severe loss of summer Arctic sea ice upon weather patterns at lower latitudes; major gaps in our understanding, and observational and/or modeling efforts that are needed to fill those gaps; and current opportunities and limitations for using Arctic sea ice predictions to assess the risk of temperature/precipitation anomalies and extreme weather events over northern continents.

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