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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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Appendix B
Workshop Agenda

DECEMBER 9, 2013: 8:30AM-5:00PM

SESSION 1 BACKGROUND AND VISION

8:30-8:40

Welcome and Opening Remarks—Kenneth Ramos, University of Louisville

8:40-9:00

What Do We Mean by Sustainable Life Science Communication Infrastructure?—Brooke Smith, COMPASS

9:00-9:30

Why Is a Science Communication Infrastructure Important—A Scientist’s Perspective—May Berenbaum, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (by phone)

SESSION 2 LIFE SCIENTISTS ENGAGED

Life scientists share their motivations for engaging with the public, what and how they communicate, and how they’ve overcome infrastructure-related obstacles.

Moderator: David Ewing Duncan, Freelance Journalist



9:30-10:45

Panel Discussion: On the Ground, Paving the Way

Daniel Colon-Ramos, Yale University (cellular neuroscience)

Craig McClain, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (marine biology; by phone)

Nalini Nadkarni, University of Utah (tropical forest ecology)

10:45-11:00

Coffee Break

SESSION 3 FRICTIONS AND MOMENTUM

What do we know about the infrastructure-related incentives and disincentives in government, academia, and industry? What do scientists themselves perceive as the frictions slowing and the areas of momentum enabling scientists to engage with the public? This session explores the available evidence, gaps in knowledge, and lessons learned.

Moderator: Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University

11:00-11:15

Moderator Overview

11:15-11:35

Agricultural Extension Programs: A Model for Life Sciences Communication?—Sonny Ramaswamy, U.S. Department of Agriculture

11:35-11:55

Public Affairs Offices and Transparency in Federal Agencies—Kathryn Foxhall, Freelance health and medical reporter

11:55-1:00

Break for Lunch

Session 3 will continue after lunch

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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1:00-1:20

Experiences with Science Communication in Academia, Industry, and Science Centers—Phillip Needleman, Washington University (by phone)

1:20-1:40

Science Communication in Academic Institutions—Diane Harley, University of California, Berkeley (by phone)

1:40-2:00

Scientist Perceptions of Infrastructure-Related Barriers—Dominique Brossard, University of Wisconsin–Madison

2:00- 3:00

Panel Discussion: Who Is Going to Champion Institutional Change?

Session 3 Speakers

3:00-3:15

Coffee Break

SESSION 4 HOW DO WE CONNECT LIFE SCIENTISTS TO PUBLIC INTERFACES?

What are institutional infrastructures to build and maintain bridges between scientists and diverse publics?

Moderator: Matthew Nisbet, American University

3:15-3:35

Infrastructure to Connect Scientists to Public Interfaces: Overview of Knowns and Unknowns—Matthew Nisbet, American University

3:35-4:45

Panel Discussion: Sustainable Connections

Academic Institutions & Broader Impacts—Jack Schultz, University of Missouri

Academic Research Centers—Donald Boesch, University of Maryland

Boundary Organizations –Chad English, COMPASS

Federal Science Communication Programs—Rick Borchelt, U.S. Department of Energy

Scientific Societies—Erika Shugart, American Society of Microbiology

4:45-5:00

Response—Daniel Sarewitz, Arizona State University

 

JANUARY 10, 2014 8:30AM-3:00PM

8:30-8:35

Welcome

Kenneth Ramos, University of Louisville

Brooke Smith, COMPASS

8:35-8:55

Recap of Day 1 (December 9, 2013)

Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University

Rick Borchelt, U.S. Department of Energy

SESSION 5 WHO IS PAYING FOR THIS?

This session will explore the motivations, challenges, and innovative approaches for funding life science communication.

Moderator: David Malakoff, Science magazine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
×

8:55-9:10

The Changing Landscape of Funding for Science Communication—John Burris, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

9:10-10:45

Panel Discussion: Frictions and Momentum in Science Communication Funding

John Burris, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Kei Koizumi, Office of Science and Technology Policy

Kai Lee, David and Lucile Packard Foundation (by phone)

Dennis Schatz, National Science Foundation

Alan Slobodin, House Energy and Commerce Committee

Amanda Stanley, Wilburforce Foundation

10:45-11:00

Coffee Break

SESSION 6 BUILDING SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURES FOR LIFE SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

11:00-12:00

Audience Engagement: Community Ideas as Building Blocks Moderator: Brooke Smith, COMPASS

Engagement Question: If you had unlimited resources to invest in life science communication and engagement activities, what three things would you invest in?

   Audience Engaged—Why and How (11:00 a.m.)

   Let the Brainstorming Begin (11:05 a.m.)

   Sharing Preliminary Ideas (11:15)

   Building the Ideas Wall (11:40)

   Investing in the Ideas (11:50)

12:00-1:00

Break for Lunch

SESSION 6 BUILDING SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURES FOR LIFE SCIENCE COMMUNICATION (Continued)

Moderator: David Ewing Duncan, Freelance health and science journalist

1:00-1:30

The Ideas Wall—Summary, Reflections, and Discussion of Major Themes

William Provine, DuPont

Amanda Stanley, Wilburforce Foundation

1:30-2:45

Where Do We Go from Here?

•   Opening Discussion

        Andrew Rosenberg, Union of Concerned Scientists

        Erika Shugart, American Society of Microbiology

•   Facilitated Audience Dialogue

2:45-3:00

Workshop Wrap-Up—Brooke Smith, COMPASS

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B--Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18728.
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Next: Appendix C--Biographies of Workshop Speakers, Panelists, Moderators, and Planning Committee Members »
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Advances in the life sciences - from the human genome to biotechnology to personalized medicine and sustainable communities - have profound implications for the well-being of society and the natural world. Improved public understanding of such scientific advances has the potential to benefit both individuals and society through enhanced quality of life and environmental protection, improved K-12 and undergraduate science education, greater understanding of human connections to the natural world, and more sustainable policies and regulations. Yet few systems of support exist to help life scientist communicators share their research with a broad range of public audiences, or engage the public in discussions about their work.

Sustainable Infrastructures for Life Science Communication is the summary of a two-part workshop convened in December 2013 and January 2014 by the National Research Council Roundtable on Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences to identify infrastructure-related barriers that inhibit or prohibit life scientists from communicating about their work and characteristics of infrastructure that facilitate or encourage scientists to engage with public audiences. The workshop featured both formal presentations and panel discussions among participants from academia, industry, journalism, the federal government, and nonprofit organizations. The presentations highlighted the motivations of and challenges to life scientist communicators, theoretical approaches to science communication, examples of different types of infrastructure to support science communication, and the need for building more sustainable science communication infrastructures. This report considers communication infrastructure across a range of life science institutions, including federal agencies, academia, industry, and nonprofit organizations and explores novel approaches to facilitate effective science communication.

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