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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
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Appendix C


Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Hedvig Hricak, M.D., Ph.D. (IOM) (Chair), is Chair of the Department of Radiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Professor in the Gerstner Sloan Kettering Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, and Professor of Radiology at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. She also holds a senior position within the Program of Molecular and Pharmacology Therapeutics at the Sloan Kettering Institute. Dr. Hricak’s research aims to advance evidence-based imaging algorithms to assist in cancer management, focusing on the development and validation of biomarkers from cross-sectional (ultrasound, MRI, CT) and molecular imaging (DCE-MRI, MR spectroscopy, and PET/CT and PET/MRI with innovative tracers) for assessing gynecological and genitourinary cancers. She has served on the advisory and editorial boards of numerous peer-reviewed journals and has published more than 345 peer-reviewed original research articles, more than 200 review articles, editorials, and book chapters, and 18 books. In recognition of her career accomplishments, she received the Marie Curie Award of the American Association of Women Radiologists (2003); the gold medals of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2003), the Association of University Radiologists, the European Society of Radiology (2012), and the Asian Oceanian Society of Radiology (2012); the Béclère medal of the International Society of Radiology (2007) and Médaille Antoine Béclère of the Journées Françaises de Radiologie (2007); the Morocco Medal of Merit (2008); the Katarina Zrinska Croatian presidential award (2009); and the Schinz Medal of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

Swiss Society of Radiology (2012). The many leadership posts she has held include President, California Academy of Medicine (1999–2000), and President, Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Board of Directors (2009–2010). Dr. Hricak earned her M.D. degree from the University of Zagreb and her Ph.D. (Dr. Med. Sc.) from the Karolinska Institute. She was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2002.

David J. Brenner, Ph.D., is Higgins Professor of Radiation Biophysics and Director of the Center for Radiological Research at the Columbia University Medical Center. He is also Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University’s Mailman School of Public Health. His research interests include the development of mechanistic models for the effects of ionizing radiation on living systems, at both the chromosomal and animal levels, and the effects of low-dose occupational and environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. Dr. Brenner has published more than 250 papers in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and is the author of two books on radiation risk for the layperson. He was the recipient of the 1991 Radiation Research Society Annual Research Award and the 1992 National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Award for Radiation Protection in Medicine. In 2011, he received the Failla Award from the Radiation Research Society at the 14th International Congress of Radiation Research. Dr. Brenner earned an M.Sc. in radiation physics from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, University of London, and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Surrey in 1980. He was awarded an honorary D.Sc. from Oxford University in 1996.

Lawrence T. Dauer, Ph.D., CHP, is a medical health physicist specializing in radiation protection in medicine. He holds appointments as Associate Attending Physicist in both the Department of Medical Physics and the Department of Radiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and he serves as the Radiation Safety Manager and Chair of its Emergency Management Committee. Dr. Dauer has spent more than 25 years in the field of radiation protection and health physics, including radiation-protection programs for the energy and industrial sectors and operations and research in medical health physics. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Health Physics, certified in comprehensive health physics, and a Licensed Medical Physicist in New York State. He is as a member of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network, has served as chair of the Radiation Safety Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, president and executive council member of the Medical Physics Section of the Health Physics Society, president of the Greater New York Chapter of the Health Physics Society, and board member of the Radiological and Medical Physics Society of New York. He is currently a council member

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 3—radiation protection in medicine. Dr. Dauer earned a Ph.D. in adult education from Capella University and an M.S. in health physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

George X. Ding, Ph.D., is Professor, Director of Medical Physics, and Chief Physicist in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is an expert in radiation dosimetry and the application of Monte Carlo techniques to radiotherapy treatment planning, and he pioneered a series of studies on the use of Monte Carlo techniques to estimate radiation exposure for patients who undergo image-guidance procedures. His research interests include Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing-radiation beams produced from medical accelerators and X-ray tubes, small-field dosimetry, development of accurate model-based dose calculation algorithms for low energy–range X-rays, and Monte Carlo dose calculations in treatment planning. In addition to his clinical, educational, and research activities, Dr. Ding is involved in many professional activities, including chairing the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group on modeling and accounting for the imaging-guidance radiation doses to patients and serving on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report Committee on Small-Field Photon Dosimetry and Applications in Radiotherapy, the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee, the AAPM Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Executive Committee, and the AAPM Biological Effects Subcommittee addressing biological effects of radiation therapy. Dr. Ding earned a Ph.D. in medical physics from Carleton University and the National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa. He is a fellow of the Canadian College of Physicists in Medicine (FCCPM) and a fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (FAAPM).

Francesca Dominici, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics and Associate Dean for Information Technology in the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) at Harvard University. Her research has focused on the development of statistical methods for the integration of large data to assess and monitor health risks, including the adjustment of measured and unmeasured confounders, Bayesian hierarchical models, causal-inference methods, and missing-data methods. Dr. Dominici is the recipient of the first Walter A. Rosenblith Young Investigator Award from the Health Effects Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; of the Myrto Lefkopoulou Distinguished Lectureship Award from the HSPH Department of Biostatistics in 2007; and of the Mortimer Spiegelman Award from the Statistics Section of the American Public Health Association in 2006. Her professional activities include mem-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

bership on the Biostatistical Methods and Research Design Study Section of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) Center for Scientific Review and service as editor of the American Journal of Epidemiology’s statistical methodology area. She has served on a number of National Academies committees, including the Committee to Assess Potential Health Effects from Exposures to PAVE PAWS Low-Level Phased-Array Radiofrequency Energy and the Committee on the Utility of Proximity-Based Herbicide Exposure Assessment in Epidemiologic Studies of Vietnam Veterans. Dr. Dominici earned her Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Padua, Italy.

Helen A. Grogan, Ph.D., is President and founder of Cascade Scientific, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in independent assessment of environmental effects and health risks from radionuclides and chemicals. She previously worked with the Paul Scherrer Institute (formerly the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research) as a member of the Repository Performance Assessment Group, where she was responsible for the biosphere modeling aspects of the safety assessment of both high-level radioactive waste and low- or intermediate-level waste repositories. Dr. Grogan is an expert in radioecology, dose reconstruction, and assessment of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. Her interests include the validation of computer models developed to predict the fate and transport of radionuclides in the environment. Dr. Grogan is an advisor to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Scientific Committee and has served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee to Review the Worker and Public Health Activities Program Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Radiation Advisory Committee Science Advisory Board; and the Scientific Committee on Dose Reconstruction for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Grogan earned her Ph.D. in radioecology from Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London.

David G. Hoel, Ph.D. (IOM), is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. He also is a principal scientist at Exponent, Inc. Dr. Hoel was at the NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for more than 20 years and served as director of its Division of Environmental Risk Assessment. He has particular interest in estimating the health effects of radiation exposures and spent 3 years working at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan, as one of its program directors. His activities also include service on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, International Atomic Energy Agency, and World Health Organization advisory committees and on the editorial boards of a number of journals. Dr. Hoel has

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

been on several National Academies committees that addressed radiation exposure and other risk-assessment topics and was a member of the NRC’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. He earned a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed postdoctoral training in preventive medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Hoel is a member of the IOM and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Edward F. Maher, Sc.D., CHP, is Associate and Senior Health Physicist for the occupational and environmental health consulting firm Dade Moeller & Associates. He is also Adjunct Lecturer on Environmental Science in the Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Environmental Health. Dr. Maher is a certified health physicist with more than 30 years of experience conducting and managing radiological, safety, and environmental-protection programs for commercial clients and federal agencies, including the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. He was formerly an officer in the U.S. Air Force (USAF), retiring with the rank of colonel. While there, he directed the USAF Radiation Assessment Team responsible for providing immediate and global responses to nuclear-weapon accidents, and he served as division chief of the Radiation Services Division and chief of the Dosimetry and Radioanalytical Services Branches at the Armstrong Laboratory at Brooks Air Force Base. Dr. Maher is a past president of the Health Physics Society and was chairman of the American Board of Health Physics in 2000. He earned a Sc.D. in radiological protection and health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

William F. Morgan, Ph.D., D.Sc., is Director of Radiation Biology and Biophysics in the Biological Sciences Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this role, he provides scientific leadership in the area of effects of radiation exposure on human health. Dr. Morgan’s areas of research include the long-term biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation exposure, radiation-induced genomic instability, and nontargeted effects of ionizing radiation. He is Principal Investigator for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area at PNNL. Dr. Morgan was previously professor and director of the Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and led radiation-research laboratories at the University of California, San Francisco, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He has served on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the National Academy of Sciences Board on Radiation Effect Research, and he is currently on the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and chairman of ICRP Committee 1. Dr. Morgan is a member of the National Council for Radiation Protec-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

tion, along with advisory committees for a number of the European Union’s Low Dose Radiation Research Program, including Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI), EpiRadBio, and low dose research towards multidisciplinary integration (DoReMi). He is on the editorial board for Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis and Mutation Research. Dr. Morgan earned a Ph.D. in cytogenetics and a D.Sc. from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Georgine M. Pion, Ph.D., is Research Associate Professor in the Quantitative Methods Program within the Department of Psychology and Human Development at the Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. Dr. Pion’s research has focused on career development and research policy, particularly as it pertains to determining the effectiveness of training programs of scientists in the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences. She has served as chair of the Technical Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation’s Survey of Earned Doctorates and as a member of several NRC and IOM committees involved in research and clinical training, including the effort responsible for the 2012 report Assuring a Future U.S.-Based Nuclear Chemistry Expertise. Dr. Pion received a Merit Award from NIH in 1999 for her survey and evaluation work and is a National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in social-environmental psychology from Claremont Graduate University and completed National Research Service Award postdoctoral traineeship in Northwestern University’s Evaluation and Research Methodology Program.

David Richardson, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the health effects of occupational and environmental exposures, particularly with regard to ionizing radiation. He has conducted studies of cancer among nuclear workers at several U.S. Department of Energy facilities and has studied cancer among the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dr. Richardson has served as a visiting scientist at the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Since 2007, he has served as Director of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health–funded training program in occupational epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is associate editor of the journals Occupational and Environmental Medicine, American Journal of Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Perspectives, is a member of the President’s Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health, and serves on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. His interna-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

tional service includes membership on the scientific advisory committee of the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Richardson earned a Ph.D. and M.S.P.H., both in epidemiology, from the University of North Carolina.

Ruth C. Wilkins, Ph.D., is Chief of the Radiobiology Division in the Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. She is also Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physics at Carleton University and a lecturer at the Michener Institute (Toronto), the Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, and St. Justine Hospital (Montreal). Dr. Wilkins is currently leading a collaboration between Defence Research and Development Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and the McMaster Institute of Applied Radiation Sciences to further develop a National Biological Dosimetry Response Plan for large-scale exposures to ionizing radiation, along with the development of new, higher-throughput methods for biological dosimetry, one of her current research interests. She has provided advice to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Global Health Initiatives Action Group, and the World Health Organization to develop International Radiation Dosimetry Networks. Dr. Wilkins earned a Ph.D. in physics from Carleton University in Ottawa.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES STAFF

David A. Butler, Ph.D., is Scholar and Director of the Medical Follow-up Agency in the IOM. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester and his Ph.D. in public-policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining the IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, was research associate in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of Public Health, and conducted research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has directed several IOM studies on military health, environmental health, and risk assessment, including ones that produced Future Uses of the DoD Joint Pathology Center Biorepository; Provision of Mental Health Counseling Services Under TRICARE; PTSD Compensation and Military Service; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998 and Update 2000; Disposition of the Air Force Health Study; and the report series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam. Dr. Butler was also a co-editor of Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System.

Ourania Kosti, Ph.D., is Senior Program Officer in the NRC’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. She joined the staff in January 2011. Prior to her

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×

current appointment, Dr. Kosti was a postdoctoral fellow at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, where she conducted research on biomarker development for early cancer detection using case-control epidemiological study designs. She focused primarily on prostate, breast, and liver cancers and on trying to identify those individuals who are at high risk for developing malignancies. She has contributed on hypothesis generation, study design, data analysis, and management of clinical databases and biospecimen repositories. Dr. Kosti also trained at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory; during the same period, she volunteered in NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. Dr. Kosti earned a B.Sc. in biochemistry from the University of Surrey, United Kingdom, an M.Sc. in molecular medicine from the University College London, and a Ph.D. in molecular endocrinology from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London.

Cary Haver, M.P.H., is Associate Program Officer in the IOM’s Board on the Health of Select Populations. As a member of the IOM staff, she has worked with the Committee on Gulf War Health: Treatment of Chronic Multisymptom Illness; the Committee to Review the Department of Labor Site Exposure Matrix; and the Committee on Long-Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan. Before joining the IOM, Ms. Haver worked for Tetra Tech Sciences, a consulting group dedicated to a variety of environmental and occupational epidemiology and toxicology projects, including exposures to asbestos, chromium, and mercury. She earned her M.P.H. with a concentration in epidemiology from George Washington University.

Sulvia Doja, M.S.H.C.P.M., is Senior Program Assistant in the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations. She earned her master’s of science degree in health care policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College and her undergraduate degree in biology with a minor in chemistry from Chatham College. Before coming to the IOM, she researched the effect of national health care reform on American Indian and Alaskan Native populations and pioneered a social-media marketing outlet to increase customer visibility and enhance communication with that population.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18732.
×
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It is probably only a matter of time before we witness the next event in which large numbers of people are exposed to ionizing radiation. In the past, planning a response to such an occurrence would have likely focused on the management of casualties from high-dose exposure. However, more recently, a different threat has come to the fore: accidental (through a containment breach in a nuclear power plant, for example) or intentional (via a "dirty bomb") releases of radioactivity resulting in low-dose exposure to a population. The magnitude of the health risks arising from low-dose radiation exposure is uncertain, and this uncertainty has significant economic implications for public health decision making.

Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure examines recent scientific knowledge about the human effects of exposure to low-dose radiation from medical, occupational, and environmental ionizing-radiation sources. This report is intended to provide advice to the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) about its role in low-dose radiation health effects research. The report identifies current research directions in radiobiological science and assesses how AFRRI programs are advancing research along these directions. The recommendations of Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure will provide guidance for AFRRI to build on its strengths and advance its mission while contributing to the body of scientific knowledge on the health effects of exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation.

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