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Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary (2014)

Chapter: Appendix C: Participant Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Appendix C

Participant Biographies

Sir George Alleyne, a native of Barbados, became Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Regional Office of WHO on February 1, 1995, and completed a second 4-year term on January 31, 2003. In 2003 he was elected Director Emeritus of PAHO. From February 2003 until December 2010 he was the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. In October 2003 he was appointed Chancellor of the University of the West Indies. He currently holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University. Sir Alleyne has received numerous awards in recognition of his work, including prestigious decorations and national honors from many countries of the Americas. In 1990, he was made Knight Bachelor by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for his services to Medicine. In 2001, he was awarded the Order of the Caribbean Community, the highest honor that can be conferred on a Caribbean national.

Mary T. Bassett is a Program Director at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, leading its African Health Initiative, an effort that focuses on strengthening health systems in projects under way in Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. In late 2011, she additionally assumed leadership for the Child Abuse Prevention Program, which for 10 years has made grants aimed at preventing child maltreatment.

Eran Bendavid is an infectious diseases physician, an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, and an affiliate at the Center for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental, epidemiologic, econometric, qualitative, modeling, and demographic tools. Bendavid blends methodological innovation and practical experience working with local and international organizations, including the Clinton Health Access Initiative (Liberia), the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation (South Africa), and the Kenya Medical Research Institute, to produce insights and strategies for health improvements. He led empirical evaluations of international malaria and HIV control initiatives. His studies on the relationship between PEPFAR and population health outcomes have appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Robert E. Black is the Professor and Director of the Institute for International Programs in the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Black is trained in medicine, infectious diseases, and epidemiology. He served as an epidemiologist at CDC and at institutions in Bangladesh and Peru on research related to childhood infectious diseases and nutrition. His current research includes field trials of vaccines, micronutrients and other nutritional interventions, effectiveness studies of health programs, and evaluation of preventive and curative health services in low- and middle-income countries. His other interests are the use of evidence in guiding policy and programs, including estimates of burden of disease, and the strengthening of public health training. He has more than 500 scientific journal publications and is co-editor of the textbook Global Health.

Carlo Carugi leads the country-level evaluation stream of work at the GEF Independent Evaluation Office since July 2009. One of his main responsibilities in this position is to lead the design, strengthening, updating, and refinement of evaluation methods, tools, and processes in use, aiming at fostering the analytical rigor as well as the independence, credibility, and utility of the GEF country-level evaluations. Triangulation analysis in mixed methods evaluations has been one of Carugi’s main interests since he joined the GEF Independent Evaluation Office. Another major area of interest is the evaluation process. In his work Carugi endeavors to foster inclusiveness and learning with evaluation users and stakeholders and in particular with national partners by promoting a much stronger role for countries in the evaluation of development policies, programs, and projects, without compromising the independence and rigor of evaluations. Carugi has 25 years of experience in environment and development, 15 of which were spent in developing countries. He has been involved in designing, managing, and directly conducting evaluations since 1991. All along his professional

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

career he conducted a number of project, program, strategic, thematic, and country-level evaluations for the European Commission, Italy, Food and Agriculture Association (FAO), and others. Carugi holds an M.Sc. in Agricultural Science and an M.Sc. in Environment and Development.

Anastasia (Tessie) Tzavaras Catsambas is President of EnCompass LLC and brings 30 years of experience in evaluation and management of international programs. Catsambas is an innovator and practitioner in appreciative evaluation methods. She brings rich field experience to her annual trainings at the American Evaluation Association’s Annual Conference since 2002 on qualitative methods, including: Appreciative Inquiry for Evaluation; Improvement and Learning Collaboratives; Evaluation Capacity Development; and Advocacy for Evaluation. She has co-authored two chapters on appreciative evaluation (Preskill & Coghlan, New Directions for Evaluation #100, 2003), and co-authored with Hallie Preskill a book titled Reframing Evaluation Through Appreciative Inquiry (Sage Publications, 2006). Catsambas’ recent work included an evaluation of the USAID Policy, Planning and Learning Bureau (PPL); a 2-year evaluation of the Gates-funded Centre for Tobacco Control in Africa (CTCA) housed in Makerere University in Uganda, and implemented by WHO; and a 2-year evaluation of the Gates-funded Ministerial Leadership Initiative (MLI) implemented by The Aspen Institute. Catsambas holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from the College of Wooster and a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University. She has trained with the late Dr. W. Edwards Deming in Quality Management. She is fluent in French and Greek, and speaks Spanish. Since 2012, Catsambas has served on the Board of the International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation as Secretary, on the Executive Group of EvalPartners, and Co-Chair of the Enabling Environment Task Force. Catsambas is committed to building equity-focused and gender-responsive evaluation globally.

Padma Chandrasekaran has had 10 plus years experience in the nonprofit health and human development sector with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and more than 18 years in for-profit information technology and venture investing. Chandrasekaran’s areas of professional expertise and interest include strategy, program management and evaluation, and analytics and the use of data for decision making. Between 2003 and 2011, she worked full time for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. She initially held responsibilities for strategy development, program management, and impact evaluation for HIV, maternal, and child health programming. She was also responsible subsequently for the foundation’s initiatives in vaccine development and delivery in India. Chandrasekaran designed, developed, and implemented strategy and systems for routine monitoring and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

management, as well as long-term impact and economic evaluation for Avahan, a key population-focused HIV prevention program covering some 220,000 sex workers, 80,000 high-risk men who have sex with men, and 20,000 intravenous drug users in six states. She also developed the initial program and program evaluation design for the foundation’s maternal and child health programming in Bihar. Chandrasekaran continues to consult for the foundation’s global activities in specific areas related to routine data systems and health economics. Prior to the foundation, her private-sector experience (1984–2003) followed a standard gradient of software developer, manager, executive officer, and entrepreneur in the Information Technology sector in India, the United States, and the United Kingdom. She was a co-founder of Sify Ltd., India’s first Internet company and part of the team that took it public on Nasdaq in 1999. She subsequently founded, ran, and sold a Web services software technology company. She is currently an active angel investor in startups in health/life sciences, big data analytics, IT, and education. She is an Executive Committee of The Chennai Angels, an angel investment group, and a Charter Member of The Indus Entrepreneurs, a global nonprofit dedicated to furthering the cause of entrepreneurship. She is also on the board of directors of several companies in India. Chandrasekaran holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and statistics from the University of Calcutta; an M.B.A. from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, and a master’s degree in telecommunications from the University of San Francisco, California. She has been lead or coauthor for peer-reviewed publications published in journals including the Lancet ID, J-Aids, and BMJ-STI.

Gina Dallabetta is a Senior Program Officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Dallabetta joined the Foundation’s Avahan-India AIDS Initiative in January 2005. She has 20 years of experience in HIV programming. Previously, Dallabetta was Director of the Prevention Department of the HIV/AIDS Institute of Family Health International (FHI). The department was responsible for sexually transmitted infection, behavior change communication, monitoring and evaluation, and related operations research in more than 40 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. She co-edited Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases: A Handbook for the Design and Management of Programs, the first book ever produced for managers of Sexually Transmitted Infection programs in developing countries, now considered a standard supplementary text for graduate programs in international health.

Peter Elias is a labor economist. He has degrees in chemistry from the University of Manchester (1967) and business administration from the University of Sheffield (1970). He worked in industry and government before

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

commencing his doctoral studies in labor economics and econometrics at the University of California, Berkeley (1971–1975). On completion of his doctorate he joined the Institute for Employment Research at the University of Warwick in 1975 and has been continuously employed there since that date. His research interests range from the evaluation of large-scale government programs designed to affect labor market behavior, statistical monitoring of the status of particular groups in the labor market, the study of occupational change, and the relationship between further and higher education, vocational training, and labor market outcomes. He has developed methods for the measurement and analysis of labor market dynamics and has a keen interest in the classification of labor market activities. On October 1, 2004, he was appointed as the ESRC Strategic Advisor for Data Resources, a post that he will hold until 2016. In his capacity as an advisor to the Economic and Social Research Council he has had responsibility for the development, implementation, maintenance, and revision of the National Strategy for Data Resources for the Social Sciences. He has helped launch Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study, new data services to provide access to administrative data, and a secure data environment for access to sensitive data. He also worked to secure funding for the new Birth Cohort Study (Life Study). In 2011 he was awarded a CBE for services to the social sciences. In December 2013 he accepted an honorary professorship at the Institute of Child Health, University College London, and was appointed as the Deputy Director of the Life Study.

Batya Elul is Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Director of Strategic Information at ICAP, a large center at Columbia University that focuses on implementation support, capacity building, and technical assistance for HIV and related health programs in resource-limited settings. In her role at ICAP, she oversees a team of 15 professionals in New York and more than 50 in sub-Saharan Africa and Central Asia to conduct monitoring, evaluation, and surveillance activities for more than 30 grants related to HIV service scale-up totaling $135 million/year. Collectively, the Strategic Information Unit collects, manages, analyzes, and uses innovative approaches to disseminate high-quality data on more than 1.7 million people enrolled in HIV care and more than 750,000 who have initiated antiretroviral therapy. She also leads efforts to provide technical assistance to and build capacity of Ministries of Health to plan and implement monitoring and evaluation, surveillance, and research activities that generate relevant and timely data for evidence-based decision making.

Victoria Fan is a research fellow and health economist at the Center for Global Development. Her research focuses on the design and evaluation of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

health policies and programs as well as of global health donors and agencies and their policies. Fan joined the center after completing her doctorate at Harvard School of Public Health where she wrote her dissertation on health systems in India. Fan has worked at various nongovernmental organizations in Asia (BRAC, Self Employed Women’s Association, and Tzu Chi), and different units at Harvard University (Initiative for Global Health, Global Equity Initiative, Program in Health Financing) and has served as a consultant for the World Bank and WHO. Fan’s ongoing research interests include health insurance and conditional cash transfers in Asia as well as health aid in Afghanistan and Haiti. Fan’s most recent publication is a report on More Health for the Money, which can be accessed at morehealthforthemoney. org.

Emmanuela Gakidou is Professor of Global Health and Director of Education and Training at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington. She also leads the institute’s research activities in the area of evaluations. In addition, she is currently a Faculty Affiliate for the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences at the University of Washington. Her research interests are impact evaluation and methods development for analytical challenges in global health. Examples of current research projects include the evaluation of Avahan—a large HIV prevention program in India, the development of a time series of educational attainment for all countries from 1960 to present, the measurement of adult mortality in developing countries, and the measurement of economic status through health surveys. Before joining IHME, Gakidou was a research associate at the Harvard Initiative for Global Health and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Prior to moving to Harvard University, Gakidou worked as a health economist at WHO, where she led work on the measurement of health inequalities. Apart from being instrumental in the founding of IHME, Gakidou is passionate about training the next generation of leaders in the field of health metrics and evaluation. She created and is directing the two fellowship programs at IHME, and is coordinating the overall curriculum and degree programs the institute offers through the Department of Global Health. Originally from Greece, Gakidou moved to the United States for higher education and received her degrees—a bachelor of arts, a master of international health economics, and a Ph.D. in health policy—from Harvard University.

Ian Goldman is Head of Evaluation and Research in the Department of Performance M&E (monitoring and evaluation) in the South African Presidency. Ian has worked in rural development, decentralization, local economic development, and community-driven development in 18 countries, working with NGOs and local, provincial, or national governments. His

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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passion is in action learning approaches for development, and the South African system is learning centered. The policy underlying the system was approved in November 2011, and 38 evaluations have been completed, are under way, or about to start, representing several billion pounds of government spending.

Catherine Goodman is a senior lecturer in health economics and policy in the Department of Global Health and Development at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has 15 years of experience in applied health systems research in low- and middle-income settings, with a focus on private-sector provision, health care financing and governance, and the economics of malaria control. Goodman has extensive experience in the economic evaluation of malaria control strategies. She has participated in numerous projects on access to antimalarial treatment. This has included the Independent Evaluation of AMFm, a multi-national antimalarial subsidy program; health facility assessments of the introduction of malaria rapid diagnostic tests; and analysis of antimalarial distribution chains under ACTwatch. She has a strong interest in methods for studying private-sector provision in general.

Carmela Green-Abate is a pediatrician with more than 35 years of experience in international health, with a special focus on child health. She has been PEPFAR Coordinator in Ethiopia since January 2009 but has lived in Ethiopia for 40 years. Previously she worked for Catholic Relief Services, latterly on their PEPFAR multicountry HIV and AIDS treatment program—AIDSRelief, where she was the Deputy Chief of Party for Africa. In that position she travelled extensively throughout Africa. She worked for USAID in Ethiopia from 1991 to 1997, initially on their orphans and vulnerable children’s program and subsequently as Senior Technical Advisor for Health. She was involved in the design of the first U.S. government–supported HIV/AIDS program in Ethiopia and then in the design and oversight of their first health-sector program. Prior to that, she worked in the Department of Pediatrics in Addis Ababa University for 14 years, in charge of neonatal services and undergraduate programs. She has been actively involved in the Ethiopian NGO sector, most notably as the founder of the Gemini Foundation, which assists very disadvantaged families with twins living in the slums of Addis Ababa. The Gemini Foundation pioneered youth involvement in creative arts as a tool for development. As part of this initiative, GemTV, winner of the 2012 One World Media Special Award, was the first community video production company in Ethiopia, spearheading docu-drama films for behavior change. The international recognized Adugna Dance Company is the only contemporary dance company in Ethiopia, with its dancers performing in many prestigious venues in London

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

and New York. Adugna also works at the community level with marginalized groups as well as with young people with disabilities.

Kara Hanson is Professor of Health System Economics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and head of the Department of Global Health and Development. She holds degrees from McGill University, Montreal, Canada; University of Cambridge, UK; and Harvard University. She has nearly 25 years of experience researching health systems in low- and middle-income countries, providing policy advice and input, and teaching health economics and supervising Ph.D. projects. Her research focuses on the financing and organization of health services, and has included research on scaling up health services, the impact of community-based health insurance, equity consequences of user fees and their removal, and expanding domestic fiscal space. She has worked extensively on the role of the private sector in health systems, identifying the opportunities and limitations of the private sector in improving the efficiency, quality, and responsiveness of health systems. Her work in this area includes studying the demand for private health services in Sri Lanka and Cyprus, developing innovative methods for studying private-sector supply chains for antimalarial medicines, and evaluating a voucher scheme for delivering insecticide-treated mosquito nets. She was a co-investigator for the Independent Evaluation of AMFm for the Global Fund. She is co-Research Director of RESYST—Resilient and Responsive Health Systems, which is a UK-DFID funded research consortium bringing together researchers from India, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Vietnam, and the United Kingdom. The RESYST program includes research on health financing, health workers, and governance and leadership in the health sector, together with a focus on capacity development and encouraging the uptake of research findings into policy and practice. She has published widely in health economics and public health journals, and was editor of Health Policy and Planning from 2001 to 2008.

Simon Hearn has spent 10 years working in international development, first for a small research firm, and for the past 6 years at the Overseas Development Institute where he is currently a Research Fellow. He specializes in understanding the interface between research and policy, particularly the role that evaluation and organizational learning can play in improving programs and systems. He is the global coordinator for the Outcome Mapping Learning Community, a global group of trainers, specialists, and users of outcome mapping, and a founding member and community facilitator of BetterEvaluation, an international initiative to improve evaluation capacity. He is an experienced trainer and facilitator and has advised a number of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

international development programs on measuring and evaluation, policy-influencing strategies, and network management.

Sharon Knight is a Professor of Health Education in the College of Health and Human Performance at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina. Her area of research interest and expertise is qualitative research. She most recently served as the qualitative consultant on an IOM global, mixed methods evaluation of the PEPFAR program. Her 25 years as a qualitative researcher and health educator in higher education was preceded by a 12-year nursing career that included service in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps.

Ryuichi Komatsu is currently Senior Advisor, TERG, at the Global Fund Secretariat. He facilitates coordination within and outside the Global Fund Secretariat to implement the work plan of the TERG and advises on policy making and strategic options and decisions of the Global Fund management. He is responsible for providing support to the TERG in the implementation of the TERG work plan including the management of independent evaluations. His experience at the Global Fund since 2005 includes managing teams on strategic information and impact evaluation. Previously, he worked for the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research in Japan and the East-West Center in the United States as well as various governmental and NGOs in different countries as part of assignments.

Margaret E. Kruk is an Assistant Professor in Health Policy and Management at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Previously, she was Policy Advisor for Health at the Millennium Project, an advisory body to the UN Secretary-General on the Millennium Development Goals, and a manager in the health care practice at McKinsey and Company in New York. Kruk holds an M.D. from McMaster University and an M.P.H. (Health Policy and Management) from Harvard University. On completing her family medicine residency, she practiced family and emergency medicine in remote northern Ontario, Canada. She conducts quantitative health systems research in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, with funding from NIH, CDC, USAID, and private foundations. She studies health care utilization, population preferences for care, and the performance of health systems in improving health, equity, and financial protection. Kruk uses novel methods to evaluate large-scale health programs and is interested in improving research design and measurement in implementation science. She has been a consultant to governments, WHO, United Nations Population Fund, and the World Bank, and she has published more than 50 research papers.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

Ann Kurth is Professor of Nursing, Medicine, and Public Health at New York University (NYU) and Associate Dean for Research at the NYU Global Institute of Public Health. As a clinically trained epidemiologist Kurth’s research focuses on sexual and reproductive health as well as on global health system strengthening and using information and communication technologies among other approaches. Her work has been funded by NIH, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, UNAIDS, CDC, and others, for studies conducted in the United States and internationally. She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and scholarly monographs, including one of the first books on women and HIV. Kurth received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington, an M.S.N. in nurse-midwifery from Yale University, and an M.P.H. in population and family health from Columbia University. Kurth was a member of the IOM/National Academy of Science Committee on PEPFAR2 Evaluation. Kurth is an elected member of the IOM, a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and of the New York Academy of Medicine, and a member of the 2014–2018 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Ruth Levine is a development economist and expert in international development, global health, and education, and she serves as the director of the Foundation’s Global Development and Population Program. Before joining the foundation, Levine was a deputy assistant administrator in the Bureau of Policy, Planning, and Learning at USAID. In that role, she led the development of the agency’s evaluation policy. Previously, she spent nearly a decade at the Center for Global Development, an international policy research institute in Washington, DC. There, she served as a Senior Fellow and vice president for programs and operations. Levine is the author of scores of books and professional publications, including a recent pair of influential reports from the Center for Global Development on development and adolescent girls: Girls Count: A Global Investment & Action Agenda and Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health. She also is coauthor of the highly regarded report When Will We Ever Learn?: Improving Lives through Impact Evaluation. Levine holds a B.S. in biochemistry from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in economic demography from the Johns Hopkins University.

Daniel Low-Beer is Head of Impact, Results, and Evaluation at the Global Fund. He has 20 years’ experience in global health, directing programs at global and country level, working with government, NGOs, and the private sector. He worked with WHO in the early 1990s, collaborating with Ministries of Health in Africa and Asia and leading the first Global Burden of HIV study. He then gained management and strategy experience in the private sector, before directing a unit on Health and Population Evaluation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

and a master’s course at Cambridge University. At the Global Fund he has led the development of results-based financing, counterpart financing, aid effectiveness, and most recently impact evaluation. He has published widely in Science, Nature Medicine, Financial Times, and edited the book Innovative Health Partnerships: The Diplomacy of Diversity.

Tanya Marchant is an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She holds an M.Sc. in medical demography (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and a Ph.D. in epidemiology (Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute). Marchant’s research has focused on issues in reproductive, maternal, and newborn health, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. This began with investigations into fertility preferences and priorities in Gambia and Tanzania and moved onto the prevention of anemia and malaria in pregnancy, including working on the National Evaluation of the Tanzanian National Voucher Scheme. More recently her focus has been on innovations to improve the survival of mothers and newborns in sub-Saharan African and India, and on large-scale measurement of processes, outputs, and outcomes along the continuum of care.

Sangeeta Mookherji is Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Health in the School of Public Health and Health Services at the George Washington University (GWU), Washington, DC. She teaches Global Health Program Evaluation, Case Study Methods for Program Evaluation, and Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. She directs the most popular program in the department, Program Design, Monitoring, and Evaluation. Mookherji’s research interests include methods for evaluating interventions to improve health systems performance; using case study methods for program and systems evaluation; urban health; tuberculosis control; and maternal and child health. Her current research includes using multiple case studies to understand what drives improvements in routine immunization performance in sub-Saharan Africa; mixed methods evaluation for the Medical Education Partnership Initiative for Africa (MEPI); and using case studies to validate theories of how information systems strengthen health service delivery. Before joining GWU in 2009, Mookherji worked for 15 years evaluating public health programs in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, Denmark, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Palestine, Tanzania, Uganda, and the United States, living in five of those countries. She has worked with evaluating a variety of public health program areas, including leading Study Area 2 of the Five-Year Evaluation of the Global Fund; assessing incentives and enablers to improve tuberculosis control systems; metrics for improving urban health systems; as well as financing for immunization, and service quality improvements for reproductive and child health, among others. During that time, she was employed by

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Crone and Koch A/S (Denmark), and Management Sciences for Health, and has worked as a consultant for the Asian Development Bank, Danida, USAID, WHO, and the World Bank. She has a B.A. in Comparative Literature and Economics from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.H.S. and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins. Her Ph.D. dissertation topic was, “Demand for health care among urban slum residents in Dhaka, Bangladesh.”

Dorothy Muroki is the Project Director of the USAID-funded Leader-with-Associates Roads to a Healthy Future (ROADS II), multi-year $200 million program. She has 20 years of experience managing health and development programming in sub-Saharan Africa, with core competencies in institutional development and strengthening for nongovernmental, community- and faith-based organizations, participatory training, and monitoring and evaluation. Muroki, a Kenyan national and a communications professional, has extensive experience and demonstrated expertise in mobilizing communities and working with them to contextualize practical and relevant program ideas to address their health challenges. She has successfully directed and managed significant partnerships between communities and local government leadership and key stakeholders, developing sustainability strategies, with a focus on indigenous associations. As the ROADS Project Director, and previously the Deputy ROADS Project Director, she has initiated, led, and been instrumental in developing key program innovations, including the “cluster” community-organizing model and programming to address accessibility and uptake of HIV and health services, gender-based violence, economic strengthening, and food insecurity in the context of HIV and broader health. Muroki has more than 10 years’ extensive and direct experience working on regional HIV and health programs that critically and effectively require high-level tact in bilateral relations with country systems, USAID country missions, and transport corridor communities. She has worked on integrating bilateral and community participation through effective feedback loops and plans of action from transport corridor sites to both regional and national policy bodies to inform critical interventions in addressing HIV and health challenges in Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Muroki holds a bachelor of commerce degree, University of Nairobi, and a master’s in communications, Daystar University, Kenya.

Bernard Nahlen has been Deputy Coordinator of the PMI since 2007. He completed his residency in Family Practice at the University of California, San Francisco, before joining CDC in 1986 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer assigned to the Malaria Branch. In 1989, he completed a second

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

residency in Preventive Medicine and later served as Deputy Director of the Los Angeles County AIDS Epidemiology Program. Nahlen’s commitment to malaria prevention and control subsequently took him to Kenya in 1992 as Director of the CDC field research station in collaboration with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). In 2000, he served as Senior Technical Advisor to the WHO Malaria Programme. At WHO, he led the Monitoring and Evaluation team as well as the Malaria in Pregnancy team. From 2005 to 2006, Bernard served as a Senior Advisor in the Performance Evaluation and Policy unit of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. He has also authored or co-authored more than 150 articles related to malaria prevention and control.

Rachel Nugent is a development economist with 30 years’ experience in policy analysis of agricultural, environmental, and health conditions in developing countries. Since 2000, she has worked on global health policy with particular emphasis on nutrition-related diseases. Nugent was a senior economist at the UN FAO from 1997 to 2000 where she led a multidepartment team to study and provide technical support for urban and peri-urban agriculture. In 2000, Nugent joined the Fogarty International Center of NIH. She served as a technical expert to WHO as a member of the international reference group for the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity, and Health. Nugent subsequently was Director of Health and Economic Development at the Population Reference Bureau and Deputy Director of Global Health at the Center for Global Development. In recent years, Nugent has worked on the economic evaluation of health interventions and fiscal policies to address noncommunicable diseases. She was a member of the IOM ad hoc Committee on Cardiovascular Disease in Developing Countries (2009–2010) and chair of the IOM Workshop on Developing a Toolkit for Managing Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in Developing Countries (2011). She is a member of the Lancet NCD Action Group, the NCD Alliance Advisory Team. She is director of the Disease Control Priorities Network at the UW Department of Global Health, and editor of the vascular disease volume of that enterprise.

Caine Rolleston graduated from the universities of Oxford and London and has worked on education and international development in a range of countries, including Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Peru, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam. He is currently a lecturer in Education and International Development at the Institute of Education, University of London, teaching on the master’s program in Educational Planning, Economics, and International Development. His research interests focus on issues in the economics of education in developing countries, educational access and equity, privatization, learning metrics and trajectories, and cognitive and noncognitive skills development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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and measurement. His work draws on longitudinal studies in education and development and employs both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Rolleston has led the education research program at Young Lives, a large-scale international cohort study of childhood poverty based at the University of Oxford since 2011, including designing and implementing school surveys and skills assessments. Previously he worked as a researcher for CREATE (Consortium for Research on Educational Access Transitions and Equity), an international research program based at the University of Sussex. He has conducted a study of low-fee private schooling in Ghana and Nigeria for OSI:PERI (Open Society Initiative: Private Education Research Initiative) and an evaluation the global costs of Education for All (EFA) for the EFA Global Monitoring Report. His doctoral work focused on issues of access to and the economic benefits of education in sub-Saharan Africa, including work on child fosterage and its impact on education, including school drop-outs in migrant labor.

Deborah L. Rugg has more than 30 years of professional international and national evaluation experience and has led international evaluation standards-setting bodies such as the HIV/AIDS Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group (MERG) where she served as Chair from 2006–2011 and the UN Evaluation Group (UNEG) where she has been serving as Vice Chair since 2012. Since August 2011, Rugg has served as the Director of Inspection and Evaluation Division (IED) in the Office of Inspection and Oversight Services (OIOS), UN Secretariat in New York City. Previously she served as Chief of the Monitoring and Evaluation Division at the Joint UN Programme on AIDS (UNAIDS) in Geneva, Switzerland. Prior to joining UNAIDS in 2005, Rugg was the Associate Director for Monitoring and Evaluation for the Global AIDS Program (GAP) of CDC in Atlanta, Georgia, from 2000 to 2005. While in Atlanta she also served as an Adjunct Associate Professor at Emory University School of Public Health. Prior to that she was Assistant Professor of Health Psychology at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine and then San Diego State University School of Public Health from 1982–1987. She joined CDC in 1987 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Division of HIV/STD Prevention. She has authored or co-authored more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and 30 major agency reports and normative guidances, primarily on evaluation methods in HIV, especially in relation to adolescents, risk groups, and HIV counseling and testing. Rugg currently serves on the IOM Committee to Evaluate the Impact of PEPFAR. She also served on the U.S. National Research Council Panel on Data and Research Priorities for Arresting AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. She has a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin in physiological psychology and earned her Ph.D. from the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine in Health Psychology in 1982.

Joanna Schellenberg is a Reader in Epidemiology and International Health based at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. After a first degree in mathematics at Oxford she studied for her M.Sc. in biometry at Reading University, and later did a Ph.D. in epidemiology at the University of Basel. She spent almost 10 years living in Tanzania, doing collaborative research work with Ifakara Health Institute. Her main research interest is the development and evaluation of public health interventions for newborn, infant, and child survival in low- and middle-income countries, including evaluation of equity as well as effectiveness. She is principal investigator of IDEAS, a 5-year project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with the aim of improving the evidence base for maternal and newborn health programs in Ethiopia, India, and Nigeria. She also leads a cluster-randomized trial in Tanzania of a behavior-change intervention to improve newborn survival through home-based counseling in pregnancy and the first few days of life; and collaborates on EQUIP, which aims to improve maternal and newborn health in Uganda and Tanzania through quality-improvement approaches linked to information from continuous household surveys.

Jonathon Lee Simon is the Director of the Center for Global Health and Development (CGHD), a multidisciplinary university-wide research center focused on health and socioeconomic development problems among marginalized populations in middle- and low-income settings. Simon is the Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University (BU). He received his B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley, in Conservation and Resource Studies, and his M.P.H. is from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. He received his Doctorate of Science from the Harvard School of Public Health, having completed dissertation research on the changing family demography in urban slum communities in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Before joining Boston University, Simon was a Fellow of the Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID). He has been involved with applied child survival research activities for more than 25 years, working in numerous developing countries, most extensively in Africa and South Asia. His primary focus is on policy and program-relevant research related to diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria with an explicit commitment to strengthening host country child health research capacity as part of all the activities. Simon served in resident positions in Pakistan and Tanzania. He recently served as global team leader of external evaluations of the PMI and the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. He is involved in conducting evaluation research studies of interventions aimed at improving

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

the well-being of orphans and vulnerable children. He is actively engaged with CGHD’s Program Evaluation and the Economic Impacts of HIV/AIDS Working Groups. Simon teaches a global public health history course to the incoming M.P.H. students as well as a course on scientific inquiry in the Kilachand Honors College for BU undergraduates in addition to mentoring doctoral students.

Sanjeev Sridharan is Director of the Evaluation Centre for Complex Health Interventions at Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michaels Hospital and Associate Professor at the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Prior to his position at Toronto, he was the Head of the Evaluation Program and Senior Research Fellow at the Research Unit in Health, Behaviour and Change at the University of Edinburgh. He is a former Associate Editor of the American Journal of Evaluation and is presently on the boards of the Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation, the Journal of Evaluation, and Evaluation and Program Planning.

Elliot Stern is an active member of the international evaluation community. He is a past-President of the European Society, was founding President of the UK Evaluation Society and the IOCE (International Organisation for Cooperation in Evaluation), and edits the journal Evaluation: The International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice. He has led major international development evaluation and consultancy projects for DFID, OECD, the European Union, UN agencies, and the World Bank. Stern is Emeritus Professor of Evaluation Research at Lancaster University and is presently Visiting Professor at Bristol University. In recent years he has specialized in evaluation methodology and design and has written extensively on evaluation methods, skills, and practice. In recent years he has developed a particular interest in causal inference and varieties of “impact” evaluation.

Martin Vaessen is a Senior Vice President at ICF International. He is currently in charge of the International Survey Research and Evaluation line of business, concentrating on survey research, with significant emphasis on maternal and child health and nutrition and diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. He came to ICF through the acquisition of Macro International. He joined the renowned DHS project at Macro International in 1985 and was its Project Director for nearly 19 years. Prior to that, he was with the International Statistical Institute from 1973 to 1984 based in London. There he worked as chief of survey operations on the implementation of comparative fertility surveys in 42 countries with the World Fertility Survey. He has worked on survey development and implementation in a large number of developing countries for a variety of donor and implementing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

agencies. A native of the Netherlands, he has lived and worked in Chile, the United Kingdom, and now in the United States. He has an M.A. in sociology from Tilburg Catholic University in the Netherlands.

Charlotte Watts is Head of the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group and founding director of the Gender, Violence and Health Centre, in the Department for Global Health and Development at London School of Health and Tropical Medicine. Originally trained as a mathematician, with further training in epidemiology, economics, and social science methods, she brings a strong multidisciplinary perspective to the complex challenge of addressing HIV and violence against women. She has more than 15 years’ experience in international HIV and violence research, including leading randomized controlled trials of violence prevention programs in sub-Saharan Africa, and mathematical modeling projections of the impact and cost-effectiveness of existing and emerging HIV programs in low- and middle-income countries.

Christopher Whitty is Chief Scientific Advisor at the UK’s DFID, where he is also director of research and evidence, and currently director of policy. He is seconded from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine where he is professor of international health. In the DFID he is responsible for the evaluation department and is on the board of the International Initiative on Impact Evaluation (3ie). His research background is in undertaking studies in Africa and Asia, including complex trials and economic and anthropological studies. He trained in medicine (still practices), epidemiology, economics, and law. He is a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, the nearest UK equivalent of the IOM.

Jimmy Whitworth became Head of Population Health at the Wellcome Trust in 2013, having previously been Head of International Activities since 2004. He is responsible for strategy, policy, and developing the scientific portfolio for research on population science and public health research in the United Kingdom and in low- and middle-income countries. Previously he was Professor of International Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is a physician, qualifying from Liverpool University in 1979, and obtaining Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in 1996. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2009. He attended the Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene course at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in 1985 where he was awarded the Blacklock Medal for Parasitology and Entomology. Whitworth specializes in infectious diseases, epidemiology, and public health. Previous roles include working in The Gambia for Save the Children Fund on providing primary and secondary health care for Upper River Division. Subsequently

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

he led investigations into ivermectin for onchocerciasis in Sierra Leone for the Medical Research Council, work for which he was awarded an M.D. with distinction in 1993. He was Team Leader for the Medical Research Council Programme on AIDS, based at the Uganda Virus Research Institute in Entebbe, from 1995 until 2002. When not living and working in Africa, Whitworth has been an academic staff member, specializing in HIV and vector-borne parasitic diseases, at both the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Geoff Wong is Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at Queen Mary, University of London in the United Kingdom. He is an internationally and nationally recognised expert in realist review and evaluation. He has extensive expertise in undertaking and providing methodological support for both methods as well as in their methodological development. He recently completed a UK National Institute of Health Research funded project to develop quality and reporting standards and training materials for realist reviews (www.ramesesproject.org). He works part time as a Family Physician in the UK’s National Health Service in London.

IOM STAFF

Charlee Alexander is a Senior Program Assistant with the IOM’s Board on Global Health. Alexander graduated from the University of Chicago in 2010 with a B.A. in political science. After moving to Washington, DC, in September 2010, she worked as a legal assistant for the environmental firm Hill & Kehne, LLC, with a focus on brownfield remediation. Through the efforts of the RACER Trust, Alexander helped to revitalize and repurpose contaminated industrial properties remaining from the General Motors bankruptcy in 2009. Prior to joining the IOM, Charlee was a legal assistant at the civil rights firm Sanford Heisler, LLP, where the majority of her cases involved race and gender discrimination in the workplace. In October 2012, she traveled to Ghana for a 5-week child labor and trafficking volunteer program with a local NGO, the Cheerful Hearts Foundation. She conducted interviews with victims of child labor and their families to develop a socioeconomic snapshot of fishing communities. While Alexander has always been interested in civil and human rights, it was her trip to Ghana that gave her a public health focus.

Bridget Kelly is a Senior Program Officer with the IOM’s Board on Global Health and the IOM/NRC Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She is the project co-director for the Workshop on Evaluation Methods for Large-Scale, Complex, Multi-National Global Health Initiatives and is also currently the study director for the Committee on the Science of Children Birth

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success. She also works on the DC Regional Public Health Case Challenge. Most recently she was the study co-director for the Evaluation of PEPFAR, an evaluation of U.S. global HIV/AIDS programs. Previously she was the study director for the report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health, and she continues to direct a series of related follow-up activities on global chronic diseases, including the workshop Country-Level Decision Making for Control of Chronic Diseases. Her prior work has encompassed prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders; depression and parenting; and methodology for benefit-cost analysis. She was a 2007 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the National Academies. She holds an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology, both from Duke University, and a B.A. from Williams College, where she was also the recipient of the Hubbard Hutchinson Fellowship in fine arts. In addition to her background in science and health, she is a dancer and choreographer and has more than 10 years of experience in grassroots arts administration and production.

Kate Meck is an Associate Program Officer at the IOM. She is working on the African Tobacco Control project and the Evaluation Methods Workshop with the Board on Global Health, as well as a study to determine Diagnostic Criteria for ME/CFS with the Board on the Health of Select Populations. She previously worked on the Evaluation of PEPFAR and with the Committee on the U.S. Commitment to Global Health, the sequel to America’s Vital Interest in Global Health (1997). Meck received her B.A. in international relations from American University, and her M.P.H. in global health program design, monitoring, and evaluation from GWU School of Public Health and Health Services.

Kimberly A. Scott has been a Senior Program Officer on the IOM’s Board on Global Health since September 2005. She currently directs two forums: one on Global Violence Prevention and the other on Public Private Partnerships for Global Health and Safety. She is also co-directing a workshop on Evaluation Methods for Large-Scale, Complex, Multi-National Global Health Initiatives. From 2009 to 2013, she was the study co-director for the outcome and impact evaluation of the U.S. global HIV/AIDS initiative known as PEPFAR. Her portfolio of work for the IOM also includes a mix of consensus studies, workshops, and other activities: the Evaluation of the Implementation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); Preventing Violence in Low- and Middle-Income Countries; the Assessment of the Role of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants; Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Health Development of Children; and Achieving Global Sustainable Surveillance for Zoonotic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

Diseases. Prior to the IOM, she was an analyst on the health care team at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Before returning to graduate school, she coordinated a foundation-funded program at Duke University’s Center for Health Policy, Law, and Management to integrate public and private mental health services into the continuum of care for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 54 counties in North Carolina. For 6 years, she served as the Executive Director of a Ryan White–funded HIV/AIDS consortium, developing a comprehensive ambulatory care system for 21 mostly rural counties in North Carolina. Previous North Carolina health-related committee service includes a number of advisory committees to the Governor of North Carolina and to the Secretary of North Carolina DHHS for programmatic and policy issues related to HIV care, prevention, and treatment, as well as substance abuse prevention and treatment. She received an M.S.P.H. in health policy analysis, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As an Echols Scholar, she completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Virginia.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Every year, public and private funders spend many billions of dollars on large-scale, complex, multi-national health initiatives. The only way to know whether these initiatives are achieving their objectives is through evaluations that examine the links between program activities and desired outcomes. Investments in such evaluations, which, like the initiatives being evaluated, are carried out in some of the world's most challenging settings, are a relatively new phenomenon. In the last five years, evaluations have been conducted to determine the effects of some of the world's largest and most complex multi-national health initiatives.

Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine in January 2014 to explore these recent evaluation experiences and to consider the lessons learned from how these evaluations were designed, carried out, and used. The workshop brought together more than 100 evaluators, researchers in the field of evaluation science, staff involved in implementing large-scale health programs, local stakeholders in the countries where the initiatives are carried out, policy makers involved in the initiatives, representatives of donor organizations, and others to derive lessons learned from past large-scale evaluations and to discuss how to apply these lessons to future evaluations. This report discusses transferable insights gained across the spectrum of choosing the evaluator, framing the evaluation, designing the evaluation, gathering and analyzing data, synthesizing findings and recommendations, and communicating key messages. The report also explores the relative benefits and limitations of different quantitative and qualitative approaches within the mixed methods designs used for these complex and costly evaluations.

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