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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
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Appendix D


Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies

JOHN APPLEGATE was named Indiana University’s (IU’s) first vice president for planning and policy in July 2008. In March 2010, his portfolio was expanded and his title changed to vice president for university regional affairs, planning, and policy. In February 2011, he became executive vice president for regional affairs, planning, and policy. In 2013, he became executive vice president for university academic affairs. Within this role, Mr. Applegate ensures coordination of university academic matters, strategic plans, external academic relations, enterprise systems, and the academic policies that enable the university to most effectively bring its vast intellectual resources to bear in serving the citizens of the state and nation. The regional affairs mission of OEVPUAA [Office of the Executive Vice President for University Academic Affairs] is to lead the development of a shared identity and mission for all of IU’s regional campuses that complement each campus’s individual identity and mission. In addition, Mr. Applegate is responsible for public safety functions across the university, including police, emergency management, and environmental health and safety. In 2006, Mr. Applegate was appointed Indiana University’s first Presidential Fellow, a role in which he served both President Emeritus Adam Herbert and current President Michael McRobbie. A distinguished environmental law scholar, Mr. Applegate joined the IU faculty in 1998. He is the Walter W. Foskett Professor of Law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington, and he served as the school’s executive associate dean for academic affairs from 2002 to 2009. He holds a law degree from Harvard Law School and a bachelor’s degree in English from Haverford College.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

BUDDY BEALER is leading the Sustainable Remediation Initiative (SRI), a not-for-profit group working to promote sustainable remediation throughout the United States. SRI is a collaborative effort of the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF), the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), and API Energy. Mr. Bealer is employed by Shell and is the soil and groundwater policy and advocacy region manager for the Americas. He works with global staff, consultants, industry, and regulators to support the development of policy based on current science. He joined Shell in 1988 and has held positions as a district engineer, environmental engineer, sales manager, and project manager. From 1997 to 2001, he managed a New Jersey environmental remediation consulting office. Mr. Bealer was a charter member (2009) to the ITRC’s Green and Sustainable Remediation Team and is an active board member of SURF, an advisory board member of the Pennsylvania State University Sustainability Institute, and a contributing author to several Sustainable Remediation papers. He earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Pennsylvania State University in 1988 and an M.B.A. from the University of Connecticut in 1997.

LARRY CAMPER has more than 36 years of experience, both in public and private sectors, within the nuclear industry. In the private sector, Mr. Camper occupied several positions of increasing management responsibility, including director of technical operations, executive vice president, and president, within a rapidly growing consulting firm that provided a broad spectrum of technical services in health physics, environmental science, radioactive waste management, and radio-pharmaceutical management. While in the private sector, Mr. Camper served as a radiation safety officer and was qualified by several states as a radiation safety expert. In addition, he was appointed by the governor to serve on the State of Maryland Radiation Control Advisory Board. In 1989, Mr. Camper returned to the USNRC as a project manager within the Division of Waste Management. In 1990, Mr. Camper became the section leader for the Medical and Academic Section, and in 1995, he was promoted to branch chief of the Medical, Academic, and Commercial Use Safety Branch, Division of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety. In 1999, he was appointed as the branch chief, Decommissioning Branch, Division of Waste Management. In 2003, Mr. Camper was appointed as the deputy director for the Licensing and Inspection Directorate in the Spent Fuel Project Office. Mr. Camper assumed his current duties in 2005, and he serves as the U.S. Representative to the Waste Safety Standards Advisory Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency and as a member of the Board of Directors and the Program Advisory Committee for the Waste Management Symposia. Mr. Camper received a B.S. degree in radiological science and an M.B.A.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

from The George Washington University. Mr. Camper is a graduate of the NRC Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program.

STEPHEN COBB is the chief of the Governmental Hazardous Waste Branch of ADEM’s Land Division, which is responsible for implementation of ADEM’s various hazardous waste permitting, compliance, and cleanup programs at local, state, and federal government facilities, which include those owned or operated by the Department of Defense (DOD), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and other federal agencies, various departments and agencies of the State of Alabama, public colleges and universities, local governments, and fund-lead Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priority List (NPL) sites. During his ADEM career, he has worked in progressively challenging roles as a hazardous waste permitting and corrective action project manager, as supervisor of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste permitting and corrective action program, and as program manager for permitting, corrective action, compliance and enforcement, and for hazardous waste notifications for RCRA, CERCLA, Voluntary Cleanup, and Brownfields programs. He is a licensed professional engineer and a certified public manager, with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in agricultural engineering from Auburn University. Mr. Cobb has actively participated in various Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)–state workgroups on hazardous waste management and cleanup issues since the early 1990s. Mr. Cobb has also been an active participant in the Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) for many years, including serving for 6 years (2004-2010) as the chair of the Hazardous Waste Subcommittee and 1 year each as vice president (2009-2010), president (2010-2011), and past president (2011-2012). Since 2000, Mr. Cobb has actively participated in national forums with DOD regarding numerous environmental permitting and waste cleanup issues, including Chemical Weapons Demilitarization, Federal Facilities Cleanup, Formerly Used Defense Sites, and Munitions Response as a part of his responsibilities with ADEM.

RULA DEEB is a principal at Geosyntec in Oakland, California. Dr. Deeb’s technical expertise includes the cross-media fate and transport of contaminants and the remediation of complex soil and groundwater sites impacted by non-aqueous phase liquids. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California (UC) at Berkeley in civil and environmental engineering. Following the completion of her graduate work, she taught environmental engineering principles at Stanford University. As a post-doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley, she developed and implemented research programs in collaboration with scientists and engineers at other universities, consulting

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

firms, and the U.S. Air Force on the remediation of sites impacted with contaminant mixtures. In 2000 she joined Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., where she managed commercial, federal, and municipal projects and clients and served as a technical specialist on key projects company-wide. Following the acquisition of Malcolm Pirnie by ARCADIS in July 2009, she served as vice president and technical director for external outreach in ARCADIS’ Environment Division. Dr. Deeb is heavily engaged in the National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering program, which brings together emerging engineering leaders from industry, academia, and government to discuss pioneering technical work and leading-edge research in various engineering fields and industry sectors. She is the recipient of the 2008 Berkeley Engineering Innovation Young Outstanding Leader Award and is a Board Certified Environmental Engineering Member of the American Association of Environmental Engineers.

GEOFFREY FETTUS is a senior project attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council’s (NRDC’s) nuclear program. His litigation and advocacy work focuses on the beginning and end of the nuclear fuel cycle, including issues associated with uranium mining and radioactive waste disposal. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School and Haverford College, Mr. Fettus worked as an assistant attorney general in New Mexico and for a public interest law firm in New Mexico before joining NRDC in 2001.

NICK GARSON is a project manager in the Boeing Environmental Remediation Group, located in Renton, Washington. He is registered as a professional geologist with the State of Washington. He works on a wide range of environmental investigation and remediation projects involving such contaminants as chlorinated solvents, metals, petroleum compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). He leads Boeing’s Sustainable Remediation Program and is currently serving as president of the Sustainable Remediation Forum. Mr. Garson holds a B.S. in geology from St. Lawrence University, M.S. in geology from the University of Montana, and an M.B.A. from Seattle University.

JEFFREY GRIFFIN is the associate laboratory director for environmental stewardship at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). In this position, he is responsible for the management, growth, and development of the SRNL research and development portfolio in environmental stewardship. Dr. Griffin has a Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He joined SRNL in 1987 and has served in positions of increasing responsibility, primarily in the areas of high-level waste processing, radiochemistry, analytical chemistry, and nuclear materials measurements. Dr. Griffin’s directorate provides strategic support to Department

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Office of Environmental Management and also provides key technical support to environmental restoration and waste management programs, not only at the Savannah River Site, but also at other DOE sites and international areas of concern. The directorate maintains core competencies in chemical process development, radioactive waste characterization and treatment technology, materials development and analysis, modeling, remediation technologies and strategies, and remote systems and robotics.

CAROLYN HUNTOON is an independent consultant with expertise in the fields of energy and aerospace. She advises governmental entities and private companies on the cleanup of nuclear weapons by-products, handling of large volumes of highly radioactive nuclear wastes, safeguarding materials that could be used in nuclear weapons, development and deployment of new technologies to address intractable cleanup problems, and remediation of extensive surface and groundwater contamination. Dr. Huntoon consults on space policy and physiologic responses to space travel. Before becoming a consultant, she had a distinguished career of more than 30 years with the federal government serving at both DOE and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Most recently, Dr. Huntoon served Presidents George W. Bush and William Clinton as DOE’s assistant secretary for environmental management, a Senate-confirmed position. In this role, Dr. Huntoon oversaw DOE’s cleanup of the nation’s nuclear weapons complex at 113 sites in 30 states and 1 territory. Additionally, she was responsible for the management of seven of DOE’s field offices (Idaho, Savannah River, Richland, Carlsbad, Ohio, Rocky Flats, and the Office of River Protection at Hanford). Dr. Huntoon served in various scientific and management positions at NASA, including as director of the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and special assistant to the administrator of NASA in Washington, DC. In addition, she served as an executive in residence in The George Washington University Project Management Program and spent 2 years at the White House in the Office of Science and Technology Policy where she was responsible for several interagency science programs. Dr. Huntoon received her undergraduate degree from Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

DAVID MALONEY has served since 1997 as technology director for CH2M Hill’s remediation work at DOE nuclear sites, where he is responsible for identifying, developing, and deploying new technology to improve on safety, cost, and schedule. On the Rocky Flats closure project, he partnered with the EM-50 Science and Technology Program to create a risk-/cost-based approach that became a model and a Congressional Line Item

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

for the weapons complex known as the Rocky Flats Initiative—delivering more than $350 million and more than 1 year of savings in the past 5 years alone. This approach comprises closely integrated contract, regulatory, and technology innovation and close partnership between the technical program and operations. Prior to CH2M Hill, Dr. Maloney’s career focused on development of sustainable infrastructure—energy, water/wastewater, and waste management—in 25 countries, where he worked in the roles of finance, investor-owner-operator, performance standards, facility regulations and licensing, and design-build-operate. For 2 years he served as assistant to the general manager, Energy and Environment Programs, at Argonne National Laboratory, where he focused on technology transfer to industry.

WALTER MUGDAN serves as director of the Emergency and Remedial Response Division at EPA’s Region 2 office, located in New York City. He heads a staff of 220 employees responsible for the Region’s “Superfund” toxic waste cleanup, emergency response, and Brownfields programs. Previously he headed the Region’s Division of Environmental Planning & Protection, where his staff of about 180 scientists, engineers, and planners managed the Region’s air, water, hazardous waste and environmental review programs. Prior to that appointment, he served as deputy regional counsel and then regional counsel for Region 2, where he headed a staff of 80 attorneys. He joined EPA in 1975 as a staff attorney and subsequently served in various supervisory positions in the Office of Regional Counsel, including chief of the units responsible for Superfund, RCRA, Toxic Substances Control Act, and the Clean Air Act.

MAUREEN SULLIVAN serves as director of environmental management at the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (lnstallations & Environment). She oversees development of environmental programs, policy, and strategic plans for DOD activities throughout the United States. She leads DOD activities in compliance with environmental laws, prevention of pollution, management of natural and cultural resources, and cleanup of contaminated sites. Ms. Sullivan also is responsible for the DOD Native American program. She is the DOD federal preservation officer and the alternate DOD member of the President’s Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Ms. Sullivan has served in various leadership positions as a member of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Environmental staff for the past 18 years, and she possesses wide-ranging experience in numerous DOD programs to include Pollution Prevention, Environmental Compliance, Historic Preservation, and the Clean Air Act. She served as the DOD representative to the Office of Management and Budget Interagency Panel, which negotiated the final Ozone and Particulate Matter National Ambient Air Quality Standards in 1997. She also served as the DOD Liaison

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

to the President’s Council on Sustainable Development. Ms. Sullivan contributed significantly to authoring Executive Order 13148, “Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management,” which President Clinton signed on April 22, 2000. She also helped draft Executive Order 12856, “Federal Compliance with Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements.” After President Clinton signed Executive Order 12856, she was detailed to EPA’s Office of the Administrator to guide initial implementation. Her total DOD career spans 29 years. Prior to joining the Office of the Secretary of Defense, she held positions with the Defense Logistics Agency in Virginia, Michigan, Ohio, and Germany, where she worked in hazardous waste management, international environmental activities, and pollution prevention.

MICHAEL TRUEX is a senior program manager, Environmental Systems Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). He has 21 years of experience at PNNL in subsurface remediation research and field applications. His experience includes providing clients with technical support for remediation decisions through technology assessments, applications of numerical fate and transport modeling, and feasibility and treatability assessments. Mr. Truex specializes in evaluation and application of in situ remediation and attenuation-based remedies. Field experience includes work at Department of Energy, Department of Defense, and private remediation sites.

ANNA WILLETT is the director of the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC). She has been involved in ITRC since 2003, first as a member of the In Situ Bioremediation and Bioremediation of DNAPLs Teams and later as the Industry Representative on the ITRC Board of Advisors. Ms. Willett joined ITRC from Comprehensive Environmental Utility Services, LLC (CEUS), where she was a senior vice president and partner. She was previously a senior engineer concentrating on remediation engineering and project management with Haley & Aldrich, Inc., a national environmental engineering firm. Earlier in her career, she was responsible for the design, implementation, and evaluation of pilot- and full-scale in situ remediation projects as a research and development manager for Re-genesis, a specialty chemical company that serves the remediation industry. Over the course of her career, Ms. Willett has evaluated a wide range of contaminated sites to determine technical and cost-effective cleanup strategies for specific site conditions. Her expertise includes chemical and biological treatment processes for groundwater and soil, as well as environmental chemistry and microbiology. She has contributed to more than 60 presentations and publications on remediation and has presented at a wide range of national and international conferences. She holds an M.S. in chemical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×

engineering from Northwestern University and a B.S. in biological engineering from Cornell University. She is a registered professional engineer.

ALICE WILLIAMS is currently the associate principal deputy assistant secretary for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). She is responsible for providing oversight of the EM Mission Units and ensuring integration across the mission areas at both DOE Headquarters and the field. Prior to her current position, Ms. Williams served as the Livermore Site Manager for the National Nuclear Security Administration. In this capacity, she was responsible for the operations, oversight, and contract administration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With a federal staff of approximately 100 positions, she performed federal oversight of safety, security, infrastructure, environmental management, and business and contract management of the multi-program laboratory with an annual budget of approximately $1.6 billion. Ms. Williams has more than 25 years of federal service, having worked in positions both in the field (Idaho Operations Office and Ohio Field Office/West Valley Demonstration Project) and at DOE Headquarters (Office of New Production Reactors, Office of Environmental Management, and the National Nuclear Security Administration/Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Environment). She has been instrumental in some of DOE’s major initiatives to develop innovative solutions to complex environmental issues, including rail transport of used nuclear fuel, facility decommissioning, and the development of land use plans. Prior to joining the federal government, she worked for EG&G at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and participated in the analysis of the Three Mile Island-Unit 2 Accident, development of reactor operating safety parameters, and building the company’s Work-for-Others portfolio. She received a B.S. in chemistry from Montana State University and a master’s of engineering degree in chemical engineering from the University of Idaho.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 167
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 168
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 170
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 172
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop 1 Speaker Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18747.
×
Page 174
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The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM) mission is the safe cleanup of sites associated with the government-led development of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. While many of these legacy sites have completed cleanup, the largest and most complex sites have not been fully remediated. The cleanup of these sites is proceeding under legally enforceable agreements with timelines for hundreds of milestones. EM is reviewing alternative approaches to increase effectiveness and improve cost efficiencies of its cleanup activities, especially for sites that will have residual contamination when active cleanup is complete.

This report is the summary of two workshops convened in October 2013 and January 2014 on best practices for risk-informed remedy selection, closure, and post-closure control of radioactive and chemically contaminated sites that present significant difficulty for remediation to unrestricted release. The workshop series aimed to explore best practices that promote effective, risk-informed decision making and future opportunities to improve remediation approaches and practices.In the Workshop #1 section of Best Practices for Risk-Informed Decision Making Regarding Contaminated Sites, the report examines holistic approaches for remediating sites with multiple contaminant sources and post-closure uses, and approaches for incorporating a sustainability framework into decision making regarding site remediation, closure, and post-closure control. In Workshop #2, the report focuses on post-closure controls, assessment of long-term performance of site remedies, and best practices for risk-based remediation decisions.

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