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Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary (2014)

Chapter: Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Appendix B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Jonathan S. Berg, M.D., Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Genetics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). He also has a clinical appointment in the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology–Oncology and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. He graduated from Emory University with a B.S. in biology and completed the M.D./Ph.D. program at UNC in the curriculum in neuroscience. He subsequently underwent residency training in clinical genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Berg is now a physician and researcher interested in the development and application of genetic tests in patients and their families. The recent revolution in genetic sequencing technology has led to an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the underlying etiology in families with genetic conditions, and yet it raises potential pitfalls that must be addressed in order to translate these new technologies into the practice of clinical genomics. Dr. Berg is particularly interested in the range of “incidental,” or “secondary,” findings that are discovered during the course of genome-scale sequencing, including the pre-test counseling and informed consent process; computational analysis required to determine the likely clinical relevance of variants; best practices for return of these findings to patients; and the impact of genomic findings on patients and their families. He is co-principal investigator of two National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants, one of them to investigate the use of genome-scale sequencing as a diagnostic test in patients with suspected genetic disorders and as a potential screening tool in healthy newborns and the other to develop a publicly available database of clinically relevant genes and variants through the “ClinGen” project. He is also an investigator in the UNC Center for Genomics and Society, which was recently renewed as a National Human

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) Center for Excellence in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research to evaluate the prospect of using genomics to improve the health of adults in the general public. Dr. Berg has led the development of a novel semi-quantitative metric that evaluates several key aspects of “actionability” in order to score gene–phenotype pairs in a transparent, unbiased fashion. This approach was adopted by the Evaluation of Genome Applications in Practice and Prevention (EGAPP) Working Group as a means of approaching the problem of systematically evaluating the clinical utility of genomic information, and it is being studied as a way to guide the return of genomic findings in projects at UNC.

Bruce D. Blumberg, M.D., is the director of graduate medical education (the resident physician training programs) for Northern California Kaiser Permanente. He currently maintains a clinical practice in medical genetics at Kaiser Permanente Oakland. He is a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, and an adjunct clinical professor of pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. His clinical interests within genetics are broad, and he has a subspecialty interest in inherited disorders of skeletal and connective tissue development. His research interest is in the area of the psychosocial and emotional aspects of prenatal diagnosis. Dr. Blumberg, who holds a medical degree from the Yale University School of Medicine, completed his residency in pediatrics at Stanford University Hospital and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for the Health Sciences as well as a fellowship in medical genetics at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College.

Jessica Everett, M.S., is a clinical instructor of internal medicine and a genetic counselor in the Cancer Genetics Clinic at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. She also provides genetic counseling as part of multi-disciplinary teams in endocrine oncology, cutaneous oncology, and pancreatic cancer clinics. She currently works on the Michigan Oncology Sequencing Project, a Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research project funded by NHGRI and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) which is exploring clinical implementation of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing for targeted oncology treatment. Ms. Everett’s research interests include clinical applications of genetic and genomic technologies and the evolving role of genetic counselors in providing comprehensive care. She participates in the education of health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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professional trainees, including genetic counseling graduate students, medical students, and hematology/oncology fellows. Ms. Everett is also active in the National Society of Genetic Counselors, and she has served as co-chair of the Familial Cancer Special Interest Group. Ms. Everett completed her M.S. in medical genetics at the University of Cincinnati in 1999 and her certification with the American Board of Genetic Counseling in 2002.

W. Gregory Feero, M.D., Ph.D., obtained his M.D./Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine’s medical scientist training program with his Ph.D. in human genetics. He then completed his residency in family medicine at the Maine–Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency Program in Augusta, Maine. After 5 years in practice in Maine, Dr. Feero accepted a position at NHGRI of NIH as senior advisor to the director for genomic medicine under Drs. Francis Collins and Alan Guttmacher. He played a key role in coordinating NHGRI’s activities related to family health history and was the planning chair for the NIH Consensus Development Program’s 2009 State of the Science Conference “Family History and Improving Health.” He also participated in efforts to help ensure the appropriate representation of family health history and genomic data in electronic health records. Additionally, as chief of the Genomic Healthcare Branch in the Office of the Director, he oversaw efforts to advance genomics education for health professional disciplines, including nurses, physician assistants, physicians, and pharmacists. In 2012, Dr. Feero stepped down from his position at NHGRI and continued on in his role as faculty and research director at the Maine–Dartmouth family medicine residency program. Currently he serves on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health and is a contributing editor for the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Feero sees patients 4 days a week in Fairfield, Maine; is board certified in family medicine; and holds professional licenses in Maine and West Virginia. He has authored numerous peer-reviewed and invited publications.

Michael J. Gambello, M.D., Ph.D., is the section chief of the Division of Medical Genetics at the Emory School of Medicine. His team diagnoses and cares for children and adults with birth defects, intellectual disability, lysosomal storage diseases, inborn errors of metabolism, and many other rare disorders. He is board certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics (ABMG) in clinical and medical biochemical genetics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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He is a member of the ABMG board of directors. He teaches genetic medicine and serves as the program director for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited medical genetics residency program. He completed his pediatric residency at St. Louis Children’s Hospital/Washington University and his clinical genetics training in the Metropolitan Washington, DC, Medical Genetics Residency Program. His laboratory studies the neurogenetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex and its association with autism. He also has interest in identifying new Mendelian neurodevelopmental disorders using whole-exome sequencing.

Geoffrey Ginsburg, M.D., Ph.D., is the founding director for genomic medicine at Duke University and assumed his current position in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy in 2004. He is also the founding executive director of the Center for Personalized Medicine, which was established in the Duke University Health System in 2010. He is currently professor of medicine and pathology at the Duke University Medical Center. While at Duke, Dr. Ginsburg has pioneered translational genomics, initiating programs in genome-enabled biomarker discovery, longitudinal registries with linked molecular and clinical data, biomarker-informed clinical trials, and the development of novel practice models and implementation research for the integration of genomic tools in health care systems. With a strong commitment to interdisciplinary science, he has led projects to develop predictive models for common complex diseases using high-dimensional genomic data as well as collaborations with engineering groups to develop novel point-of-care sensors. His work spans oncology, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic disorders, and his research addresses the challenges for translating genomic information into medical practice using new and innovative paradigms and also examines the integration of personalized medicine into health care. He is an internationally recognized expert in genomics and personalized medicine with more than 200 published papers, and he has received funding from NIH, the Department of Defense, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and industry. In 1990, he joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School, where he was director of preventive cardiology at Beth Israel Hospital and led a laboratory in applied genetics of cardiovascular disease at Children’s Hospital. In 1997, he joined Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., as senior program director for cardiovascular diseases and was eventually appointed vice president of molecular and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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personalized medicine, with responsibility for developing pharmacogenomic strategies for therapeutics as well as biomarkers for disease and their implementation in the drug development process. He has received a number of awards for his research accomplishments, including the Innovator in Medicine Award from Millennium in 2004 and the Basic Research Achievement Award in Cardiovascular Medicine from Duke in 2005. He is a founding member and former board member of the Personalized Medicine Coalition, a senior consulting editor for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, an editor for The HUGO Journal, and an editorial advisor for Science Translational Medicine. In addition, he is the editor of Genomic and Personalized Medicine (Elsevier), whose first edition was published in 2009. He has been a member of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs Advisory Council on Genomic Medicine and the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research at NIH. He is currently an international expert panel member for Genome Canada; a member of the board of external experts for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; co-chair of the IOM Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health; and a member of the external scientific panel for the Pharmacogenomics Research Network. He has recently been appointed to the advisory council for the newly established National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at NIH. He has recently been nominated to serve on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Personalized and Precision Medicine. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. in biophysics from Boston University and completed an internal medicine residency at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Subsequently he pursued postdoctoral training in clinical cardiovascular medicine at Beth Israel Hospital and in molecular biology at Children’s Hospital as a Bugher Foundation Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Katrina Goddard, Ph.D., is a senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Northwest Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon. She focuses on public health genomics and the translation of genetic testing into practice. She co-directs a study that is part of the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research consortium to explore how to use a new technology—whole-genome sequencing—in everyday clinical practice. The study will test would-be parents before they conceive for genetic mutations that could cause rare but serious diseases in their children and will explore how to implement such testing in a health plan. Dr. Goddard also co-directs the Knowledge Synthesis Center for the EGAPP program, which supports

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×

evidence-based recommendations on genomic applications. She is a co-investigator for the Clinical Genome Resource program funded by NHGRI. That program is designing and implementing a framework to evaluate which genes play a role in disease and are relevant to patient care. Dr. Goddard is director of the NW Biobank, a repository of blood and tissue samples linked to the comprehensive electronic medical records of Kaiser Permanente’s members. The NW Biobank enables researchers to connect people’s genetic information with their health care, including vital signs, diagnoses, and treatments. In 2007, Dr. Goddard completed a 1-year fellowship in the National Office of Public Health Genomics, which was jointly sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and the American Society of Human Genetics. Prior to her appointment as a senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Dr. Goddard was on the faculty at Case Western Reserve University in the Division of Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology. She received her Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Washington in 1999 and a B.S. in molecular biology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Robert C. Green, M.D., M.P.H., is a medical geneticist and physician–scientist who directs the Genomes to People (G2P) Research Program (genomes2people.org) in translational genomics and health outcomes in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Green is the principal investigator of the Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer’s Disease (REVEAL) Study, funded by NIH, in which a cross-disciplinary team has conducted four separate multi-center randomized clinical trials, collectively enrolling 1,100 individuals to disclose a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease in order to explore emerging themes in translational genomics. Dr. Green also co-directs the NIH-funded PGen Study, the first prospective study of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. He is the principal investigator of the MedSeq Project, the first NIH-funded research study to explore the use of whole-genome sequencing in the clinical practice of medicine, and he co-directs the BabySeq Project, the first NIH-funded trial of sequencing in newborns. The MedSeq and BabySeq projects are conducing pilot trials in utilizing whole-genome sequencing, both in patients who are affected with hereditary disease and in those who are healthy, and studying downstream impact on health, behavior, and economics. Dr. Green is currently the associate director for research at the Partners Center for Personalized Genetic Medicine, a board member of the Council for Responsible Genetics and a member of the informed cohort oversight

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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boards for both the Children’s Hospital Boston Gene Partnership Program and the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative. He was lead author of the recently published recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics for the management of incidental findings in clinical sequencing.

Madhuri Hegde, Ph.D., FACMG, is a professor of human genetics and the executive director of the Emory Genetics Laboratory at Emory University. Her areas of specialty and interest are muscular dystrophy and novel and high-throughput methodologies to detect and interpret sequence variation. The focus of her laboratory is to develop and perform comprehensive mutation analysis and interpretation for complex or challenging genetic disorders using multiple approaches. The primary focus of her clinical work is the development of high-throughput next-generation sequencing strategies for rare disorders using sequence capture technologies, robotics, clinical exome and genome sequencing, oligonucleotide array platforms, and robotics. Her research is focused on gene discovery and the functional analysis of sequence variants in disease-associated genes, specifically muscular dystrophies and translating what is learned in the basic research laboratory to clinical practice. She received a B.Sc. and a M.Sc. from the University of Bombay, India, and a Ph.D. from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. She did postdoctoral studies at Baylor College of Medicine and is board certified in clinical molecular genetics.

Kathleen T. Hickey, Ed.D., FNP-BC, ANP-BC, R.N., CCRN, APNG, FAHA, FAAN, is an assistant professor of nursing and a family/adult nurse practitioner in the Division of Cardiology at Columbia University. She is also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Alumni, focusing her research on the interrelated areas of arrhythmias, cardiogenetics, and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. Dr. Hickey has received funding from NIH, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Columbia University to support her research endeavors. For more than 20 years she has collaborated with interdisciplinary teams in her role as a nurse practitioner on several landmark multi-center NIH clinical trials that contributed significant advances in knowledge to the fields of arrhythmia, heart failure, and overall cardiovascular research. She consistently advocates for nursing’s critical role in the rapidly evolving field of genomics while raising public awareness of potentially life-threatening cardiac conditions. Dr. Hickey is part of a small cadre of cardiogenetic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×

nurse practitioners in the United States who focus on improving the lives of families with inherited cardiac conditions. She is actively involved in the American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Functional Genomics and the International Society of Nursing Genetics (ISONG). She is the past president of ISONG, and her efforts are recognized on both a national and international level. Dr. Hickey received her doctorate from Columbia University, and her postdoctoral education includes participation in the National Institute of Nursing Research Summer Genetics Institute and NHGRI. She is recognized as a nurse leader who shapes and improves the lives of cardiovascular patients and their families.

Amy Hower, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist focused largely in the fields of neural development and regeneration. Her thesis work was concentrated in the areas of axon growth and guidance, receptor biology, enzyme biology, cell signaling, and oncogenesis. She has technical expertise in many aspects of molecular biology, protein biochemistry, imaging, cell culture, and behavior. Dr. Hower received her Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Miami School of Medicine and her bachelors degrees from the UNC at Chapel Hill. She has also carried out research projects at Harvard University, the University of Hawaii, Duke University, and field stations, including Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Maine and Tiputini Research Station in Ecuador. Dr. Hower has authored multiple peer-reviewed papers and received various competitive awards and recognitions.

Louis B. Jacques, M.D., joined the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2003 and has been director of the Coverage and Analysis Group (CAG) since October 2009. The group reviews evidence and develops Medicare national coverage policy. From 2004 through 2009 he was director of the Division of Items and Devices within CAG. Prior to his arrival at CMS, Dr. Jacques was the associate dean for curriculum at Georgetown University School of Medicine, where he retains a faculty appointment. He served on a number of university committees including the executive faculty, committee on admissions, and the institutional review board. He previously worked in the palliative care program at Georgetown’s Lombardi Cancer Center where he covered the gynecologic oncology service and he made home visits as a volunteer physician for a rural hospice on the Maryland Eastern Shore.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Muin J. Khoury, M.D., Ph.D., is the first and current director of the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The office was formed in 1997 to evaluate how advances in human genomics can be used responsibly and effectively to improve health and prevent disease across the lifespan. CDC’s Office of Public Health Genomics serves as the national focus for integrating genomics into public health research and programs for disease prevention and health promotion. Dr. Khoury joined CDC as an epidemic intelligence service officer in 1980 in the Birth Defects and Genetic Diseases Branch and served as a medical epidemiologist in that branch beginning in 1987. In 1990 he became deputy chief of the same branch. In addition to his CDC role, since 2007 Dr. Khoury has served as a senior consultant in public health genomics at the NCI. Since 2011 he has also served as the acting associate director for the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at NCI. Dr. Khoury received his B.S. in biology and chemistry from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and received his medical degree and pediatrics training from the same institution. He received a Ph.D. in human genetics and genetic epidemiology and training in medical genetics from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Khoury is board certified in medical genetics. Dr. Khoury has published extensively in the fields of genetic epidemiology and public health genetics, is a member of many professional societies, and serves on the editorial boards of several journals. He is an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Emory University School of Public Health and an associate in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Shashikant Kulkarni, Ph.D., is the director of cytogenomics and molecular pathology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He is an associate professor in the departments of pathology and immunology, pediatrics, and genetics. He trained at Harvard Medical School, Imperial College in London, and at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences. He is a board-certified medical geneticist by the American Board of Medical Genetics. In his role at Washington University, Dr. Kulkarni oversees one of the most modern Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments–certified and College of American Pathologist–accredited state-of-the-art, full-service academic cytogenomics and molecular pathology laboratories in the country, which is currently staffed by more than 150 board-certified pathologists, clinical ge-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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nomocists, clinical bioinformaticists, and certified genetic technologists. Test areas include prenatal diagnostics, perinatal and childhood studies in the evaluation of congenital and developmental disorders, infertility and pregnancy loss studies, and cancer. Dr. Kulkarni is actively involved in defining standards for next-generation sequencing in clinical diagnostics through his collaboration with CDC through the Clinical Next-Generation-Sequencing Quality Standards National Working Group, and he is a co-chairman of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute for microarray-based clinical diagnostics. He also serves on the scientific advisory board of the National Institute of General Medical Science. Dr. Kulkarni is considered an expert and key opinion leader in the field of clinical genomics and next-generation sequencing technology, and he has given numerous invited presentations both nationally and internationally. He is on the editorial board of several peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Kulkarni is the program director of the clinical genomics training program at the Washington University School of Medicine and trains residents and fellows in clinical genomics. He conducts basic research in the genomics of multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia and has published extensively in such peer-reviewed journals as Cell, Nature, Nature Biotechnology, Journal of American Medical Association, and New England Journal of Medicine.

Debra G. B. Leonard, M.D., Ph.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Pathology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, and physician leader of pathology and laboratory medicine at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, Vermont. She is an expert in the molecular pathology of genetic and infectious diseases and cancer and in policy development for genomic medicine. Her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees were completed at the New York University School of Medicine, where she also did her postgraduate clinical training in anatomic pathology, including a surgical pathology fellowship. She is certified by the American Board of Pathology in anatomic pathology and by the American Boards of Pathology and Medical Genetics in molecular genetic pathology. Currently Dr. Leonard is a member of the IOM Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, and she previously served as a member of the IOM Committee on the Review of Genomics-Based Tests for Predicting Outcomes in Clinical Trials. She is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and chair of CAP’s personalized health care committee. Dr. Leonard is a past member of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society to Secretary Michael O.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Leavitt and a past president and 2009 Leadership Award recipient of the Association for Molecular Pathology. She has spoken widely on various molecular pathology test services, the future of molecular pathology, the impact of gene patents on molecular pathology, and the practice of genomic medicine.

Gary Lyman, M.D., M.P.H., is a practicing medical oncologist and is nationally and internationally recognized for his leadership in comparative effectiveness, health services, and outcomes research. He is a full member in the Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, where he co-directs the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, a multidisciplinary team devoted to clinical and economic evaluations of new and existing cancer prevention, screening, and treatment technologies. In addition, Dr. Lyman is a professor in the School of Public Health and School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington. The overarching goal of Dr. Lyman’s research is the reliable and valid demonstration of the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of clinical interventions in real-world cancer patients, ranging from prevention and screening to treatment to survivorship and cancer surveillance. He has published some 400 research articles in the professional medical literature. Dr. Lyman’s research has played a key role in establishing clinical practice guidelines for cancer management through the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and he is co-leading the development of comprehensive ASCO breast cancer and survivorship guidelines. He has served on numerous ASCO committees, including the ASCO Value in Cancer Care Task Force, which is leading efforts to integrate economics into evidence-based medicine, policy, and research. Dr. Lyman currently serves on the ASCO board of directors and is also active with the American Society of Hematology and several other professional clinical and cancer research organizations.

Robert S. McDonough, M.D., J.D., is senior director of clinical policy research and development for Aetna, where he is responsible for developing Aetna’s clinical policies. He is co-chairman of Aetna’s Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee and Aetna’s Policy and Plan Design Committee. He is a member of the advisory board for the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review. He has special interests in preventive health services, technology assessment, and outcomes research. He is former senior analyst and project director with the health program of the Congressional

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Office of Technology Assessment. He is a graduate of the Duke University School of Medicine and School of Law (J.D.), and he has a master’s degree in policy analysis from Duke’s Sanford Institute of Public Policy. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Legal Medicine.

Heidi L. Rehm, Ph.D., FACMG, is the director of the Laboratory for Molecular Medicine at the Partners Healthcare Center for Personalized Genetic Medicine and an assistant professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School. Her lab focuses on the translation of new genetic discoveries and technologies into clinical tests that can be used to improve patient outcomes, supporting the model of personalized medicine. Dr. Rehm also conducts research in hearing loss, Usher syndrome, genomic medicine, and health care information technology.

Mark Robson, M.D., is an attending physician of the Clinical Genetics and Breast Cancer Medicine Services in the Department of Medicine at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center. He received his B.Sc. from Washington and Lee University and his M.D. from the University of Virginia. He performed residency and fellowship training at Walter Reed Army Medical center before coming to Memorial Sloan–Kettering in 1996. He is currently the clinic director of the Clinical Genetics Service and the immediate past chair of the Cancer Genetics Subcommittee of the Cancer Prevention Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Robson’s research is primarily directed toward improving the integration of genetic information into the clinical management of women with breast cancer. He and his colleagues have conducted a number of studies examining outcomes in women with hereditary breast cancer in order to better define the risks and benefits of treatments such as breast-conserving therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. He and his co-workers have also conducted a number of studies examining the effectiveness of screening interventions such as breast magnetic resonance imaging or ovarian cancer screening in women at hereditary risk. He is currently conducting studies to evaluate the impact of intensive screening or surgical prevention upon women’s quality of life and to develop new screening tools, such as serum peptide profiling. He is also investigating the optimal integration of new genetic technologies, such as genomic profiling, into the care of women at risk for breast cancer.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Howard M. Saal, M.D., is a professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He is the director of the Section of Clinical Genetics in the Division of Human Genetics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and medical director of the Cytogenetics Laboratory. Dr. Saal is board certified in clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics, and pediatrics. Prior to moving to Cincinnati, Dr. Saal was the director of the Cytogenetics Laboratory at the University of Connecticut Health Center and subsequently vice-chairman of the Department of Medical Genetics at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC, where he was also the director of the Craniofacial Center. Dr. Saal is interested in the genetic etiologies and natural histories of craniofacial disorders, especially cleft lip and cleft palate. He is also has an interest in the ethical aspects of genetics, genomics, and genetic testing. Dr. Saal has authored or co-authored more than 100 publications primarily centered on the etiology, natural history, and management of various genetic conditions, with special attention to neurofibromatosis, cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence. His career has also included involvement in community activities, having been named to the health professionals advisory committee and later to the board of directors of the National Capital Area March of Dimes, and he serves on the medical advisory council for the Ohio Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps and Developmental Disorders. His national committee activities include having been chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Genetics and Birth Defects, chair of the AAP Committee on Genetics, and president of the American Cleft Palate–Craniofacial Association. Dr. Saal has been at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center for 20 years, and his accomplishments have included establishing urban genetics outreach clinics in Hamilton County, developing the Cincinnati Children’s Hereditary Cancer Program, and acting as director of the Craniofacial Center at Cincinnati Children’s, where he continues to cultivate his interests in the care of children and families with genetic conditions and craniofacial disorders.

Sharon Terry, M.A., is president and chief executive officer of the Genetic Alliance, a network of more than 10,000 organizations, 1,200 of which are disease advocacy organizations. Genetic Alliance improves health through the authentic engagement of communities and individuals. It develops innovative solutions through novel partnerships, connecting consumers to smart services. Ms. Terry is the founding chief executive officer of PXE International, a research advocacy organization for the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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genetic condition pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). As co-discoverer of the gene associated with PXE, ABCC6, she holds the patent for that gene and has assigned her rights to the foundation. She developed a diagnostic test for PXE and is conducting clinical trials. Ms. Terry is also a co-founder of the Genetic Alliance Registry and Biobank. She is the author of more than 90 peer-reviewed articles. In her position at the forefront of consumer participation in genetics research, services, and policy, she serves in a leadership role on many of the major international and national organizations, including the IOM Health Sciences Policy Board, the National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics board, and the International Rare Disease Research Consortium Interim Executive Committee, and is a member of the IOM Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health. She is on the editorial boards of several journals. She was instrumental in the passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. She received an honorary doctorate from Iona College in 2005 for her work in community engagement, the first Patient Service Award from the University of North Carolina Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy in 2007, the Research!America Distinguished Organization Advocacy Award in 2009, and the Clinical Research Forum and Foundation’s Annual Award for Leadership in Public Advocacy in 2011. She is an Ashoka Fellow.

David L. Veenstra, Pharm.D., Ph.D., is a professor in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program in the Department of Pharmacy and a member of the Institute for Public Health Genetics at the University of Washington, Seattle. He graduated from the University of California, San Francisco, with doctoral degrees in clinical pharmacy and computational chemistry. He carried out his postdoctoral training in outcomes research with the University of Washington, including a 1-year externship with Roche Global Pharmacoeconomics. Dr. Veenstra’s primary research interests are the clinical, economic, and policy implications of using genomic information in health care. His major research projects include evaluation of warfarin pharmacogenomics and decision modeling in breast and lung cancer to inform research prioritization and stakeholder decision making. Dr. Veenstra’s research is funded through grants from the CDC, NCI, NHGRI, and the National Institute for General Medical Sciences. Dr. Veenstra is a member of EGAPP, a CDC-sponsored, evidence-based recommendation group for genetic tests. Dr. Veenstra’s other major research interest is the development of disease-simulation models for chronic diseases. He has worked extensively with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy to develop guidelines and train decision makers in the practical application of cost-effectiveness models. Dr. Veenstra is an author or co-author of 100 peer-reviewed publications and 5 book chapters.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18799.
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Rapid advances in technology have lowered the cost of sequencing an individual's genome from the several billion dollars that it cost a decade ago to just a few thousand dollars today and have correspondingly greatly expanded the use of genomic information in medicine. Because of the lack of evidence available for assessing variants, evaluation bodies have made only a few recommendations for the use of genetic tests in health care. For example, organizations, such as the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group, have sought to set standards for the kinds of evaluations needed to make population-level health decisions. However, due to insufficient evidence, it has been challenging to recommend the use of a genetic test. An additional challenge to using large-scale sequencing in the clinic is that it may uncover "secondary," or "incidental," findings - genetic variants that have been associated with a disease but that are not necessarily related to the conditions that led to the decision to use genomic testing. Furthermore, as more genetic variants are associated with diseases, new information becomes available about genomic tests performed previously, which raises issues about how and whether to return this information to physicians and patients and also about who is responsible for the information.

To help develop a better understanding of how genomic information is used for healthcare decision making, the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health of the Institute of Medicine held a workshop in Washington,DC in February 2014. Stakeholders, including clinicians, researchers, patients, and government officials, discussed the issues related to the use of genomic information in medical practice. Assessing Genomic Sequencing Information for Health Care Decision Making is the summary of that workshop. This report compares and contrasts evidence evaluation processes for different clinical indications and discusses key challenges in the evidence evaluation process.

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