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Furthering America's Research Enterprise (2014)

Chapter: Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Richard F. Celeste (Chair) was president of Colorado College, where he served until 2011. He was director of the Peace Corps from 1979 to 1981 and served as U.S. ambassador to India from 1997 to 2001. He was governor of Ohio from 1983 to 1991, following which he served as managing partner in the consulting firm of Celeste & Sabety, Ltd. Mr. Celeste graduated magna cum laude from Yale University, where he remained for one additional year as a Carnegie teaching fellow. In 1961, he went to Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar. He returned to Yale in 1963 for graduate study, working as curriculum advisor and part-time civics teacher.

Rodney A. Brooks is Panasonic professor of robotics emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is a robotics entrepreneur and founder, chairman, and chief technical officer (CTO) of Rethink Robotics (formerly Heartland Robotics). He is also a founder, former board member, and former CTO of iRobot Corporation. Dr. Brooks was the director (1997-2007) of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and then of the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He also held research positions at Carnegie Mellon University and MIT and a faculty position at Stanford University. He served as a member of the International Scientific Advisory Group of National Information and Communication Technology Australia and the Global Innovation and Technology Advisory Council of John Deere & Co. His research interests are in computer vision, artificial intelligence, robotics, and artificial life. Dr. Brooks received degrees in pure mathematics from the Flinders University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

South Australia and a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 1981.

Alicia Carriquiry is distinguished professor of statistics at Iowa State University. Her research interests are in Bayesian statistics and general methods. Her recent work focuses on nutrition and dietary assessment, as well as on problems in genomics, forensic sciences, and traffic safety. Dr. Carriquiry is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has served on the executive committee of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and of the American Statistical Association and was a member of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. She holds an M.Sc. in animal science from the University of Illinois, an M.Sc. in statistics, and a Ph.D. in statistics and animal genetics from Iowa State University.

Steven Ceulemans, National Academies Christine Mirzayan science and technology policy graduate fellow and consultant, is vice president of innovation and technology for the Birmingham Business Alliance, where he supports the growth of the Alabama knowledge economy through technology-based economic development in the Birmingham region. He previously served as director of technology commercialization for the New Orleans BioInnovation Center, growing technology start-ups in New Orleans, Louisiana. He worked in research and development roles for a number of organizations, including the PwC Health Research Institute, Software AG, the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium, Tibotec (Johnson & Johnson), Procter & Gamble, and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission). In 2010, Mr. Ceulemans received the Louisiana Governor’s Technology Award as Academic Technology Leader of the Year. He is a doctoral candidate in health systems management at Tulane University and holds master ’s degrees in international business from Vlekho Business School in Brussels and in biochemistry and molecular biology from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Christopher M. Coburn is vice president, research ventures and licensing, Partners HealthCare, where he is responsible for commercial application of health care innovations. Representing Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and McLean Hospital, Partners HealthCare is the largest academic research enterprise in the United States, with nearly $1.5 billion in sponsored research. Prior to joining Partners, Mr. Coburn was founding executive director of Cleveland Clinic Innova-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

tions, Cleveland Clinic’s corporate venturing arm. During his 13-year tenure, Cleveland Clinic spun off 57 companies that raised more than $700 million in equity financing. Mr. Coburn has served on many corporate and community boards, including those of Autonomic Technologies, Explorys, and the U.S. Enrichment Corporation. He is a former vice president and general manager of Battelle Memorial Institute. He served under Governor Richard Celeste as Ohio’s chief technology officer. He has consulted, testified, and spoken on innovation and commercialization throughout North America and in nearly 30 countries. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from John Carroll University and an M.P.A. from George Washington University.

Stephen E. Fienberg is Maurice Falk University professor of statistics and social science in the Department of Statistics, the Machine Learning Department, the Heinz College, and Cylab at Carnegie Mellon University. A leader in the development of statistical methods for the analysis of multivariate categorical data, he also has worked on the development of statistical methods for large-scale sample surveys and censuses, such as those carried out by the federal government, and on the interrelationships between sample surveys and randomized experiments. His current research includes technical and policy aspects of privacy and confidentiality and methods for the analysis of network data. Dr. Fienberg also has been active in the application of statistical methods to legal problems and in assessment of the appropriateness of statistical testimony in actual legal cases, and he has linked his interest in Bayesian decision making to the issues of legal decision making. Dr. Fienberg is cochair of the National Academies Report Review Committee. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Society of Canada. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University.

Ann R. Griswold is a science and health writer and the owner of SciScripter Writing & Editing, through which she prepares content for universities, medical organizations, scientific academies, and other nonprofit organizations. She was previously media and communications manager for the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of Florida, an M.A. in science writing from Johns Hopkins University, and a B.S. in microbiology from the University of Maryland. She is certified by the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

Bronwyn H. Hall is professor of economics (emerita), University of California, Berkeley, and professor of economics of technology and innovation, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands. Her research focuses on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

the economics and econometrics of technical change. She is coeditor of the Handbook of the Economics of Innovation. Her current research includes comparative analysis of the U.S. and European patent systems, the use of patent citation data for the valuation of intangible (knowledge) assets, comparative firm-level investment and innovation studies (the G-7 economies), measurement of the returns to research and development (R&D) and innovation at the firm level, and analysis of technology policies such as R&D subsidies and tax incentives and of recent changes in patenting behavior in the semiconductor and computer industries. Dr. Hall has made substantial contributions to applied economic research through the creation of software for econometric estimation and of firm-level data for the study of innovation, including a widely used database on U.S. patents. She is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Institute for Fiscal Studies, London. She is also founder and partner of TSP International, an econometric software firm. She holds a B.A. in physics from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

John E. Kelly, III is senior vice president and director, research, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM). He directs the worldwide operations of IBM Research, with approximately 3,000 scientists and technical employees at 12 laboratories in 10 countries around the world, and helps guide IBM’s overall technical strategy. His top priorities are to stimulate innovation in key areas of information technology and quickly bring those innovations to market, to sustain and grow IBM’s existing business and create new businesses, and to apply these innovations to help IBM clients succeed. Dr. Kelly also leads IBM’s worldwide intellectual property efforts. IBM has led the world in U.S. patents for 19 consecutive years, generating more than 6,000 patents in 2011 and delivering more than $1 billion per year in income from its intellectual property. Dr. Kelly was previously senior vice president of IBM technology and intellectual property and vice president of systems, technology, and science for IBM Research. He has served on the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. He holds an M.S. in physics and a Ph.D. in materials engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Josh Lerner is Jacob H. Schiff professor of investment banking at Harvard Business School and head of its entrepreneurial management unit. His research focuses on issues concerning technological innovation and public policy, in particular on the structure and role of venture capital and private equity organizations and on innovation policies and how they impact firm strategies. He codirects the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program. Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

Lerner founded and runs the Private Capital Research Institute, a nonprofit devoted to encouraging access to data and research on venture capital and private equity. He is a recipient of the Swedish government’s 2010 Global Entrepreneurship Research Award. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

David C. Mowery is professor of new enterprise development, Walter A. Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He holds the William A. & Betty H. Hasler chair in new enterprise development, Haas Business and Public Policy Group. He has served as an adviser to OECD and a number of government agencies and industrial firms. His research interests include the impact of technological change on economic growth and employment; management of technological change; and international trade policy and U.S. technology policy, especially high-technology joint ventures. Dr. Mowery has written on industrial leadership, the global computer software industry, competitiveness strategy for the global chemicals industry, and collaborative R&D, among other topics. He holds a B.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

Jason Owen-Smith is Barger Leadership Institute professor and associate professor of sociology and organizational studies and director of the Barger Leadership Institute at the University of Michigan. Dr. Owen-Smith is a sociologist who examines how science, commerce, and the law cohere and conflict in contemporary societies and economies. His research examines the dynamics of high-technology industries, the commercialization of academic research, and the science and politics of human embryonic stem cell research. He seeks to understand how organizations, institutions, and networks can maintain the status quo while generating novelty through social transformations, scientific discoveries, and technological breakthroughs. Dr. Owen-Smith is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industries Studies fellowship in biotechnology. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Arizona.

John Edward Porter is a partner in the international law firm of Hogan Lovells US LLP. He served 21 years as U.S. Congressman from the 10th district in Illinois, serving on the Appropriations Committee and as chair of the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. His subcommittee had jurisdiction over all of the federal government’s health programs and agencies (including the National Institutes of Health [NIH] and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but excepting the Food and Drug Administration) and education programs and agencies. During his chairmanship, he led efforts resulting in dou-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

bling of the funding for NIH. Mr. Porter was founder and cochairman of the Congressional Human Rights Caucus, a voluntary association of more than 250 members of Congress working to identify, monitor, and end human rights violations worldwide. He coauthored the legislation creating Radio Free Asia and served as chair of the Global Legislators Organized for a Balanced Environment. He currently chairs Research! America and is vice chair of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of the boards of the PBS Foundation and the First Focus Campaign for Children. He is a member of the Bretton Woods Committee, the Inter-American Dialogue and the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was chairman of PBS and a trustee of the Brookings Institution and served on boards of the RAND Corporation, the American Heart Association, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Among more than 275 awards for his service in Congress is the Mary Wood Lasker Award for Public Service. Before his election to Congress, Mr. Porter served in the Illinois House of Representatives and prior to that as an honor law graduate attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice in the Kennedy administration. He attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and is a graduate of Northwestern University and, with distinction, of the University of Michigan Law School. He holds 10 honorary degrees. The John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center on the NIH campus is named in his honor. Mr. Porter is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the 2014 recipient of the National Academy of Sciences Public Welfare Medal, the Academy’s highest honor.

Stephanie S. Shipp is deputy director and research professor, Social and Decision Analytics Laboratory, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, National Capital Region. Her research focuses on the intersection of the science of big data, resiliency, and metropolitan analytics. Previously, she was a senior research staff member, Institute for Defense Analysis Science and Technology Policy Institute (IDA STPI), and she is currently an adjunct staff at IDA STPI. Dr. Shipp specializes in the assessment of science and technology projects, programs, and portfolios. Her work spans topics related to innovation and competitiveness, with emphasis on advanced manufacturing, the role of federal laboratories, and funding of high-risk/high-reward research. She was previously director of the Economic Assessment Office in the Advanced Technology Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Prior to that, she led economic and statistical programs at the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Federal Reserve Board. She was a member of the international advisory board for VINNOVA, Sweden’s innovation agency, and led expert panels in 2012 and 2014 that evaluated the Swedish Research Council’s Linnaeus Grants, which provide direct government

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

funding to research fields to increase Sweden’s competitiveness. Dr. Shipp holds a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University.

Miron L. Straf (Study Director) is deputy director (special projects) of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Research Council. Previously, he served as director of the division’s Committee on National Statistics and was at the National Science Foundation, where he worked on developing the research priority area for the social, behavioral, and economic sciences. Dr. Straf served on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, and the London School of Economics and Political Science and was president of the American Statistical Association. He received the American Association of Public Opinion Research’s Innovators Award for his work on cognitive aspects of survey methodology. His major research interests are government statistics and the use of statistics and research for public policy decision making. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago.

Gregory Tassey is a research fellow in the Economic Policy Research Center, University of Washington. His major fields of research are the economics of innovation, technology-based economic growth policies, and impact analysis of research and development programs. His research has been published in policy and economics journals, and he is the author of four books, the most recent of which is The Technology Imperative. He previously was a senior economist in the National Institute of Standards and Technology and served as cochair of the White House National Science and Technology Council’s Interagency Working Group on Advanced Manufacturing. Dr. Tassey holds a B.A. in physics from McDaniel College and a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University.

Jeffrey Wadsworth is president and chief executive officer, Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle is the world’s largest nonprofit R&D organization, with a history of scientific discoveries in the fields of energy, security, and health and life science that is manifest in such everyday products as copiers, bar codes, cruise controls, and green airplane deicers. Dr. Wadsworth previously worked at Stanford, Lockheed, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, joining Battelle in 2002 as part of the White House Transition Planning Office for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He was then director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and subsequently headed Battelle’s Global Laboratory Operations, directing laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy, DHS, and others. He is a member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering and a fellow of three technical societies. As a board member of Achieve, Inc. and the Business Higher Education Forum, Dr. Wadsworth has helped lead national efforts

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×

to enhance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. He holds a B.Met., Ph.D., D.Met., and D.Eng. (Honorary) in metallurgy from the University of Sheffield.

David Ward is chancellor emeritus, University of Wisconsin–Madison. He served as chancellor for two terms, as provost and vice-chancellor for academic affairs, and as associate dean of the Graduate School. He also held the Andrew Hill Clark professorship of geography. As chancellor, Dr. Ward oversaw a major overhaul of the university’s information technology infrastructure, as well as the development of a cluster-hiring program called the Madison Initiative Investment Plan. He created the university’s Technology Transfer Council, which was instrumental in the growth of University Research Park. Dr. Ward has served as chairman of the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development and as president of the American Council on Education. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Furthering America's Research Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18804.
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Scientific research has enabled America to remain at the forefront of global competition for commercially viable technologies and other innovations. For more than 65 years, the United States has led the world in science and technology. Discoveries from scientific research have extended our understanding of the physical and natural world, the cosmos, society, and of humans - their minds, bodies, and economic and other social interactions. Through these discoveries, science has enabled longer and healthier lives, provided for a better-educated citizenry, enhanced the national economy, and strengthened America's position in the global economy. At a time of budget stringency, how can we foster scientific innovation to ensure America's unprecedented prosperity, security, and quality of life?

Although many studies have investigated the impacts of research on society, Furthering America's Research Enterprise brings to bear a fresh approach informed by a more holistic understanding of the research enterprise as a complex, dynamic system. This understanding illuminates why America's research enterprise has historically been so successful; where attention should be focused to increase the societal benefits of research investments; and how those who make decisions on the allocation of funds for scientific research can best carry out their task.

This report will be of special interest to policy makers who support or manage the research enterprise, to others in public and private institutions who fund research, to scholars of the research enterprise, and to scientists and engineers who seek to better understand the many pathways through which their research benefits society.

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