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Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop (2014)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
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Appendix C

Biographies of Speakers

Joanne Cohoon

Associate Professor, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia; and Senior Research Scientist, National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) Social Science Network

Cohoon is a sociologist who teaches about gender, technology, and education and supervises both graduate and undergraduate student research. She researches, publishes, and speaks on women’s underrepresentation in IT and gender segregation in higher education, and has conducted nationwide studies of departmental factors that influence recruitment and retention at the undergraduate and graduate levels of computer science. She is a member of the Georgia Tech College of Computing Diversity Advisory Board, the PROACT Advisory Board, and the Working Committee on Women in Computing of ACM-W. She has a BA in philosophy from Ramapo College (New Jersey), an MA in student personnel administration in higher education from Columbia University, and a PhD in sociology (dissertation on Non-Parallel Processing: Gendered Attrition from Undergraduate Computer Science) from the University of Virginia.

Nadya A. Fouad

Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

Fouad conducts research on the work-related decisions of women and ethnic minorities. She is editor of counseling Psychologist, past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology of the American Psychological Association, past chair of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs, and past chair of the Board of Educational Affairs of the American Psychological Association. She received her PhD in counseling psychology at the University of Minnesota.

Gail Greenfield

Principal, Mercer Consulting

Greenfield has been involved with studies of the US geospatial intelligence workforce; the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce in the US Department of Defense and defense industrial base; and the US energy and mining workforce. She is also a principal at Mercer, where she has more than 10 years of experience helping organizations improve the management of their human capital. Recent projects include diversity-related analyses of pay for a professional services organization and a hospital system to identify areas of these organizations with systemic pay disparities, and the generation of diversity benchmarks for four occupations in 18 countries for an international equipment manufacturer. Before joining Mercer, she was an assistant professor of economics at the College of Wooster. She received a PhD in economics from Claremont Graduate University and a BA in business economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Romila Singh

Associate Professor, Lubar School of Business, and Associate Research Director of the Center for the Study of the Workplace, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

Singh’s research focuses on understanding career management issues related to career choices, work-life relationships, mentoring, retention, and turnover decisions of women and people of color. Her research has appeared in leading journals on management and vocational behavior, and she has also authored or coauthored several book chapters. She teaches courses in human resources management at undergraduate and graduate levels and has been awarded the School of Business teaching award every year since 2002. She is the faculty advisor for the student chapter of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
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the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) at UWM and helps this student-led organization win national awards and recognition for their professional programming and activities. She serves on the executive board for the Careers Division of the National Academy of Management. Singh received her doctorate in organizational sciences from Drexel University.

Lilian Wu

Program Executive, Global University Programs, IBM; and Past Chair, National Research Council Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine

Wu manages a portfolio of major IBM-university-government research collaborations for IBM’s Global University Programs. She has had a distinguished career at IBM mostly as a researcher in the mathematical sciences department, where her focus was on developing business planning methods and pricing of commodities and contracts, both under uncertainty. Her current interests are analysis of technology-enabled and people-intensive complex systems, particularly in the education and service sectors. She recently coauthored and published “Leadership hurdles” (Nature 493:125–126) and in 2012 contributed to The Cost Disease: Why Computers Get Cheaper and Health Care Doesn’t (ed. W.J. Baumol; Yale University Press, 2012). She served on President Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST); NSF’s Committee on Equal Opportunity in Science and Engineering, Engineering Directorate Advisory Committee, Committee on International Science and Engineering, and Corporate Alliance; the AAAS Committee on Public Understanding of Science and Technology; and the DOE Secretary’s Laboratory Operations Advisory Board. She received her BS in mathematics from the University of Maryland, PhD in applied mathematics from Cornell University, and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Marymount College.

Carnegie Mellon University Heinz College Capstone Project Team

Members

Emily Blakemore spent her first semester as a White House intern on the Domestic Policy Council in the Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation. She plans to spend her spring semester as an intern in CNN’s Situation Room. Prior to starting the Carnegie Mellon program, she was a Coro Fellow in Public Affairs in Pittsburgh, where she worked with the Jail Collaborative Initiative, the Criminal Court Division, and the Allegheny County Jail to reduce recidivism throughout Allegheny County. She is a 2010 graduate of the University of Virginia, where she majored in English and developed her interest in politics and policy while working as a field organizer on Obama’s presidential campaign and several local races in Albemarle County. She grew up in Tokyo, Singapore, and Paris and is now proud to call Charlottesville, Virginia, home.

Born and raised in Southern California, Angie Im’s exposure to urban policy issues has shaped her experiences and interest in the intersection of business, environment, health, and technology. After receiving a BS in public health sciences from the University of California, Irvine, she worked at the California Department of Fish and Game on a unique, public-private partnership for developing marine protected areas along the California coast. As a result of her experience there and with a nonprofit organization conducting medical and humanitarian missions abroad, she was inspired to transition her focus from the sciences to public policy as an avenue for safeguarding the health and environment of future generations. She is honing her evaluative and technical skills as a program analyst trainee at the Department of Justice, and looks forward to working with IBM as a consultant in San Francisco in the fall.

Channing Martin recently moved back to Washington, DC to finish her degree while she works at the US Office of Personnel Management through the Pathways program. She will complete three four-month rotations in Executive Resources, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the Chief Human Capital Officers Council. Before attending Carnegie Mellon, she completed the Coro Fellowship in Public Affairs in Pittsburgh after her graduation from the University of Pittsburgh, where she studied economics, French, and global studies. Upon graduation, Martin plans to apply to the Fulbright US Student Program. She hopes to continue in the field of diversity and inclusion issues with a focus on promoting access to women and minorities.

Albery Melo is an international relations analyst in the Department of Labor’s Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Traffic. She manages 12 congressionally mandated reports, working closely with foreign embassies, stakeholders, and interagency personnel. Her portfolio covers countries in the Latin American and Caribbean region as well as some smaller countries in sub-Saharan Africa. In the past, as a dependency case manager she worked closely with clients to end child abuse. She graduated from Cornell University with a focus in human development in 2009.

Sara Raju is an apprentice at the US Department of Interior in the Office of the Executive Secretariat and Regulatory Affairs, where she helps clear federal regulations for publication. She has interned at the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC. She received her BA in mathematics and political science from the University at Buffalo, where she also worked as event coordinator for the chapter of Engineers for a Sustainable World. She has wide-ranging

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
×

knowledge of computer applications such as MATLAB, Mathematica, Auto-CAD, SAS, and Maple.

Liz Schuelke excels when she dives into projects headfirst and immerses herself in the community, meets the stakeholders, and experiences the complexities of problem solving in the public arena. Her determination and her passion for public service have allowed her to take on leadership roles and gain valuable experience both academically and professionally. She currently serves as a global intergovernmental liaison at the State Department in the Office of the Special Representative for Global Intergovernmental Affairs, where she uses her skills garnered from nearly four years working on political campaigns across the nation. She holds a bachelor’s of arts in international relations from the University of North Texas.

Course Instructor

Andy Richman is chief executive officer of Moonrider, the developer of Art Jam™, a platform for creating engaging interactive experiences using graphics and high-performance audio. Media companies, digital agencies, brands, publishers, and app developers use Art Jam to deliver mobile, PC, home entertainment, and digital-out-of-home experiences. Before cofounding Moonrider, Richman was a cofounder and executive director of Matrix Knowledge Group (UK), a provider of services and technology where he led their global expansion into new markets including the United States and Europe. He was copresident of College Measures, an education technology-focused joint venture between the American Institutes for Research and Matrix. Since relocating to the United States in 2008, Richman has served as an adjunct faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University.

Project Advisors

Joanne Cohoon, Associate Professor, School of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Virginia, and Senior Research Scientist, NCWIT

Ruthe A. Farmer, Director of Strategic Initiatives, NCWIT

Allan Fisher, Higher Education Executive, Laureate Education, and INTI International University, Malaysia

Lilian Wu, Program Executive, IBM Global University Program

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Speakers." National Research Council and National Academy of Engineering. 2014. Career Choices of Female Engineers: A Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18810.
×
Page 29
Next: Appendix D:Stemming the Tide: Why Women Engineers Stay in, or Leave, the Engineering Profession »
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Despite decades of government, university, and employer efforts to close the gender gap in engineering, women make up only 11 percent of practicing engineers in the United States. What factors influence women graduates' decisions to enter the engineering workforce and either to stay in or leave the field as their careers progress? Researchers are both tapping existing data and fielding new surveys to help answer these questions.

On April 24, 2013, the National Research Council Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop to explore emerging research and to discuss career pathways and outcomes for women who have received bachelor's degrees in engineering. Participants included academic researchers and representatives from the Department of Labor, National Science Foundation, and Census Bureau, as well as several engineering professional societies. Career Choices of Female Engineers summarizes the presentations and discussions of the workshop.

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