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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
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Appendix D

Workshop Presenter Biographies

WORKSHOP PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES

Major General Julie A. Bentz is the director, Strategic Capabilities Policy on the National Security Staff within the Executive Office of the President. She is responsible for writing presidential policy, coordinating interagency dialogue, informing presidential budgetary decisions and building consensus on interagency initiatives in programs that develop United States strategic capabilities to meet 21st century requirements. General Bentz has served in a variety of active, reserve, and National Guard assignments revolving around nuclear defense, homeland security, health physics, environmental sciences and traditional nuclear, biological, and chemical officer assignments. She served as the principal deputy for Nuclear Defense within the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary for Nuclear Matters. Previously, General Bentz worked with the Homeland Security Council where she helped to establish a joint domestic nuclear detection office within the Department of Homeland Security. She played a key role in developing a whole of government approach to nuclear forensics including the creation of the National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center. General Bentz also performed within the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System process as the combat developer for the National Guard Bureau.

Dr. Daniel Blumenthal manages the Consequence Management programs in the Office of Emergency Response at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the Department of Energy (DOE). In 2009, he transferred from the Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office where he was the chief test scientist. Prior to joining the Federal government he was a senior scientist at the Department of Energy’s Remote Sensing Laboratory from 1996 to 2006 where he managed or provided scientific support to several DOE emergency response teams. Most recently Dr. Blumenthal led the initial DOE response team to Japan where he spent a total of 7 weeks following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011. Dr. Blumenthal’s background is in nuclear physics and he is also a Certified Health Physicist (CHP).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×

Dr. Martin Cetron, MD, is the director for the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Cetron holds faculty appointments in the Division of Infectious Disease at the Emory University School of Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology at Rollins School of Public Health. He trained in Internal Medicine at the University of Virginia and Infectious Diseases at the University of Washington before joining the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service and becoming a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) in 1992. His primary research interests are international health and global migration with a focus on emerging infections, tropical diseases, and vaccine-preventable diseases in mobile populations. DGMQ regularly publishes the textbook Health Information for International Travel, known widely as the CDC Yellow Book, providing health promotion and disease prevention guidance to travelers globally. Dr. Cetron has also been a leader in public health emergency preparedness and response activities at CDC and is a graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health & Kennedy School of Government’s National Preparedness Leadership Institute. Since 1992, he has led several domestic and international outbreak investigations, conducted epidemiologic research, and been involved in domestic and international emergency responses. He has played a leadership role in CDC responses to intentional and naturally-acquired emerging infectious disease outbreaks including the 2001 anthrax bio-terrorism incident, the 2003 global SARS epidemic, the 2003 U.S. Monkeypox outbreak and recent 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Dr. Cetron is part of the CDC pandemic influenza planning, preparedness, and response team. He leads CDC’s preparedness for international border responses and community mitigation strategies; most recently, he headed the CM Task Force response to 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza. Dr. Cetron is also part of the WHO Influenza Pandemic Task Force. Dr. Cetron has authored or co-authored more than 100 publications and received numerous awards for his work since joining CDC in 1992. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1981, and his M.D. from Tufts University in 1985.

Mr. Chuck Donnell is vice president of Disaster Services Planning and Doctrine at The American Red Cross. He joined the American Red Cross in May 2013 with significant international and domestic disaster response experience. In his previous role at the White House, he was the special assistant to the President and Senior Director for Resilience Policy on the National Security Staff. While at the National Security Staff he managed several portfolios including National Preparedness Policy, National Response Policy, Medical Preparedness Policy, National Security Communications Policy, Homeland Security Grants, National Exercises, Continuity, and Presidential Emergency Declarations under the Robert T. Stafford Act. Mr. Donnell served 25 years in the U.S. Army achieving the rank of Colonel before his retirement in 2012. He was commissioned through the Central Michigan University Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program in 1987 and served in a variety of Infantry and Civil Affairs assignments including disaster relief operations for the 2004 Southeast Asia Tsunami and 2010 earthquake in Haiti. He also served as the chief, Joint Directorate of Military Support (JDOMS) on the Joint Staff where he coordinated Defense Support to Civil Authority (DSCA) activities and as the organizational integrator for Special Operations Forces on the Army Staff. Mr. Donnell holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Central Michigan University and a Master’s in strategic studies from the Army War College. Chuck has been married for 25 years and he and his wife Janice have two daughters.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×

Mr. Chad Gorman is currently the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High Explosives (CBRNE) office director within the Response Directorate at Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters. He is responsible for overseeing the specialized CBRNE teams and programs maintained by FEMA and for working throughout the agency to enhance FEMA’s ability to respond and recover from all-hazards events. Mr. Gorman is a trained intelligence officer and extensive experience dealing with National Security and Counterterrorism issues. Before joining FEMA, Mr. Gorman was a member of the DHS Incident Management Planning Team (IMPT) and led several sensitive DHS planning efforts focused on providing Departmental assets to support forward deployed military units. These plans directly supported senior military commanders in both Afghanistan and Iraq. He worked for the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as a senior intelligence analyst and senior warning officer responsible for providing indications and warning intelligence analysis to DHS senior leadership and federal, state, local and tribal officials. Prior to working for DHS, Mr. Gorman provided intelligence support to the Joint Staff as a member of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Joint Intelligence Task Force for Combating Terrorism. Mr. Gorman has a Bachelors of Arts in criminology and criminal justice, with a citation in science and technology in society, from University of Maryland, College Park and received his Masters in security studies (Homeland Security) at the Naval Post Graduate School-Center for Homeland Defense and Security in March 2012. He resides in Manassas, Virginia with his wife Jessica and their two children.

Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa is professor of the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies and is science advisor to the Cabinet of Japan. He is also member of President Council of the University of Tokyo; professor emeritus of the University of Tokyo; senior scientist of the Earth Institute, Columbia University; governor of Japan Chapter of American College of Physicians; and chairman of Health Policy Institute, Japan. Dr. Kurokawa is the former president of the Science Council of Japan (2003-2006) and Pacific Science Association (2003-2007). He has also served in many ministerial committees in Japan including science advisor for the Ministry of Education, Sciences, and Culture; member and chair of several Special Committees of the Ministry of Health and Welfare; and member of the National Health Policy Council of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. He was professor of Medicine at Departments of Medicine UCLA School of Medicine (1979-1984), University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine (1989-1996), dean of Tokai University School of Medicine (1996-2002), and Research Center of Advanced Science and Technology of the University of Tokyo (2003-2006). Dr. Kurokawa is a recipient of Order of Purple from the Government of Japan for Excellence in Academic Achievements in 1999.

The Honorable Paul N. Stockton is president of Cloud Peak Analytics and managing director at Sonecon, LLC. Previously, he served as the assistant secretary of defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs from May 2009 until January 2013. In that position, he was responsible for DOD initiatives to strengthen security in the Western Hemisphere and help partner nations build their capacities to meet emerging security challenges. Dr. Stockton created the Department’s first-ever Mission Assurance Strategy, and launched a range of initiatives with the private sector, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Homeland Security to help ensure the availability of energy to DOD facilities. He also guided the Defense Critical Infrastructure Protection program, served as DOD’s Domestic Crisis Manager, and helped lead the Department’s response to Superstorm Sandy, Deepwater Horizon, and other disasters. In

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×

addition, Dr. Stockton was responsible for DOD policy on domestic antiterrorism, maritime domain awareness, air sovereignty, and preparedness for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events. Dr. Stockton was twice awarded the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, DOD’s highest civilian award. The Department of Homeland Security awarded Dr. Stockton its Distinguished Public Service Medal. From 2010 until January 2013, Dr. Stockton served as executive director of the Council of Governors, where he helped Governors, the National Guard, DOD, DHS, and FEMA adopt initiatives to strengthen Federal-State collaboration and unity of effort. In addition, from 2009 to 2012, Dr. Stockton served as the acting U.S. co-chair of the Canada-U.S. Permanent Joint Board of Defense, the premier organization for defense policy coordination between the two Nations. Dr. Stockton currently serves as scholar in Residence at George Washington University’s Homeland Security Policy Institute. Prior to being confirmed as assistant secretary, Dr. Stockton served as a senior research scholar at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation, and as associate provost of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). While at NPS, Dr. Stockton also founded and led its School of International Graduate Studies, the Center for Homeland Defense and Security, and the Center for Civil-Military Relations. Prior to joining NPS, Dr. Stockton served as research associate for the International Institute for Strategic Studies and as legislative assistant for defense, foreign relations, and intelligence for Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Dr. Stockton holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University and a BA Summa Cum Laude from Dartmouth College. He is lead co-author of “Prosecuting Cyberterrorists: Applying Traditional Jurisdictional Frameworks to a Modern Threat,” Stanford Law & Policy Review (forthcoming June 2014), and has published in International Security, Political Science Quarterly, Homeland Security Affairs (which he helped found in 2005), and other peer-reviewed journals and edited volumes. Dr. Stockton holds a current TS/SCI clearance.

Colonel Patrick Terrell is currently serving as the WMD Military Advisor and deputy director for CBRN Defense Policy in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Combating WMD. He was commissioned through ROTC at New Mexico Military Institute and has spent 25 years on active duty in the U.S. Army as a chemical officer. During that time he has served in tactical chemical defense staff assignments with the 1st Battalion, 27th Field Artillery; the Headquarters, 41st Field Artillery Brigade; Headquarters, 2nd Armored Division; Headquarters, 2nd Armored Division Artillery; and Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division. He served as the operations officer for the 9th Battalion, 1st Field Artillery and the 2nd Chemical Battalion. His commands include the 44th Chemical Company, 2nd Armored Division (reflagged to the 31st Chemical Company, 4th Infantry Division) and the 22nd Chemical Battalion (Technical Escort). Other assignments have included Political-Military planner, Joint Staff; chemical Organizational and Systems Integrator, Army Staff; chemical assignment officer, branch chief, and executive officer to the Director, Officer Personal Management, U.S. Army Human Resources Command; Chief Operational and Strategic Concepts, Maneuver Support Center; and most recently Stability Transition Team Leader, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Colonel Terrell has a Bachelor’s Degree in business administration from New Mexico State University, Masters of Science in administration from Central Michigan University, and a Masters in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×

Mr. Brent H. Woodworth is the president and CEO of the Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Foundation and chairman of the Sahana Software Foundation. He also serves as a member of the national Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR/NEHRP) and on the American Red Cross advisory board for the Southern California region. In addition, he is the project manager for the national DHS/FEMA Community Innovations Resilience Award Program being supported by the Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Foundation. Mr. Woodworth is a well-known leader in global risk and crisis management, and has worked and consulted with governments, private sector companies, and non-profit organizations to help them more effectively prepare, mitigate, respond, and recover from significant risk exposures and crisis events. In December 2007, he retired from IBM after 32 years of service that included the development and management of all worldwide crisis response team operations. He is the founder and manager of "The Crisis Response Team"—a team of individual international specialists who have responded on-site to over 70 major crisis events in 49 countries, and is responsible for the concept creation, initial design and roll-out of the open source international emergency management software system “Sahana,” considered a global standard for nationwide crisis management (www.sahanafoundation.org). Mr. Woodworth has developed innovative business enterprise risk management procedures for early identification and mitigation of potential exposures for large private sector corporations. He was chairman of the Multihazard Mitigation Council’s congressionally mandated study on the benefits of government and private sector investment in pre-disaster mitigation, and he testified to Congress on the need for additional investment in mitigation. Brent is certified in business continuity planning, incident management, disaster communications, search and rescue, and emergency medical services. He is a regularly featured speaker on radio and television broadcasts along with industry conferences, government sessions, and senior executive board meetings. Brent has written multiple articles on disaster management and has been a guest lecturer at colleges and universities including Caltech, Stanford, Wharton, USC, U.S. Naval Post Graduate Academy, Harvard, and Yale Law Schools. Mr. Woodworth and his team have worked for many years in cooperation with international United Nations relief agencies and NGO’s including WHO, WFP, OCHA, World Bank, UNHCR, World Vision International, Red Cross, and USAID. He has a B.S. from the University of Southern California in marketing management.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Presenter Biographies." National Research Council. 2014. An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18814.
×
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Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and high-yield Explosive (CBRNE) events have the potential to destabilize governments, create conditions that exacerbate violence or promote terrorism. This can trigger global repercussions. These events can quickly overwhelm the infrastructure and capability of the responders, especially in countries that do not have the specialized resources for response like those available in the United States. When a CBRNE incident occurs in a partner nation or other foreign country, the U.S. is often called upon to provide assistance. Interoperability - the ability to work together - among U.S. agencies, foreign governments, and responders involved in the effort is key to an efficient response. The effectiveness of the U.S. response and approach to CBRNE events in partner nations depends on the capability of the U.S. government to provide timely and appropriate assistance and the resilience of the partner nation to a CBRNE event.

An All-of-Government Approach to Increase Resilience for International Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) Events is the summary of a workshop convened in June 2013 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Research Council to discuss ways to strengthen the U.S. ability to prepare for and respond to CBRNE events that occur in U.S. partner nations. The workshop brought together diverse experts and stakeholders to identify capabilities that are necessary for responding to an international CBRNE event; discuss best practices and resources needed for improved interoperability of the U.S. and partner nation during response to a CBRNE event; and identify key questions that need to be addressed in follow up activities focused on improving U.S. CBRNE response in partner nations.

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