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The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment (2014)

Chapter: References: General

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Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
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References: General

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Baker, D., C. Park, C. Sweeney, L. McCormack, M. Durkin, R. Brenner, D. Dabelea, and B. Entwisle. (2014). Recruitment of women in the National Children’s Study initial Vanguard Study. American Journal of Epidemiology. Available: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/05/01/aje.kwu062.short?rss=1 [May 2014].

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Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×

Duncan, G.J., J. Boisjoly, and K. Mullan Harris. (2001). Sibling, peer, neighbor, and schoolmate correlations as indicators of the importance of context for adolescent development. Demography 38(3):437-447.

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Hamilton, B.E., D.L. Hoyert, J.A. Martin, D.M. Strobino, and B. Guyer. (2013). Annual summary of vital statistics: 2010-2011. Pediatrics 131:548-558.

Hardy, R., and D. Kuh. (2009). The practicalities of undertaking family-based studies. In Family Matters: Designing, Analyzing, and Understanding Family-Based Studies in Life Course Epidemiology, pp. 181-191, D.A. Lawlor, and G.D. Mishra (eds.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hofman, A., V. Jaddoe, J. Mackenbach, H. Moll, R. Snijders, E. Steegers, F. Verhulst, J. Witteman, and H. Buller. (2004). Growth, development, and health from early fetal life until young adulthood: The Generation R Study. Paediatric Perinatal Epidemiology 18(1):61-72.

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Landrigan, P.J., and A. Miodovnik. (2011). Children’s health and the environment: An overview. Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine 78(1):1-10.

Landrigan, P.J., L. Trasande, L.E. Thorpe, C. Gwynn P.J. Lioy, M.E. D’Alton, H.S. Lipkind, J. Swanson, P.D. Wadhwa, E.B. Clark, V.A. Rauh, F.P. Perera, and E. Susser. (2006). The National Children’s Study: A 21-year prospective study of 100,000 American children. Pediatrics 118(5):2173-2186.

LaVeist, T.A. (2005). Disentangling race and socioeconomic status: A key to solving health disparities. Journal of Urban Health 82(Suppl. 3):26-34.

Lawlor, D.A., A.M. Andersen, and G.D. Batty. (2009). Birth cohort studies: Past, present, and future. International Journal of Epidemiology 38:897-902.

MacDorman, M.F., M.S. Matthews, and E. Declercq. (2014). Trends in out-of-hospital births in the United States, 1990-2012. National Center for Health Statistics. NCHS Data Brief No 14. Available: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db144.htm [March 2014].

Magnus, P., L.M. Irgens, K. Haug, W. Nystad, R. Skjaerven, C. Stoltenberg, and the Moba Study Group. (2006). Cohort profile: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). International Journal of Epidemiolology 35(5):1146-1150.

Michael, R.T., and C.A. O’Muircheartaigh. (2008). Design priorities and disciplinary perspectives: The case of the US National Children’s Study. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 171(2):465-480.

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Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development. J.P. Schonkoff, and D.A. Phillips (eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Commission on Behavioral and Social Science and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

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NICHD. See separate reference list for National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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Seith, D., and E. Isakson. (2011). Who Are America’s Poor Children? Examining Health Disparities Among Children in the United States. National Center for Children in Poverty, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Available: http://www.nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_995.pdf [March 2014].

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Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×

Williams, D.R., and M. Sternthal. (2010). Understanding racial/ethnic disparities in health: sociological contribution. Journal of Health and Social Behavior 51(Suppl. 1):S15-27.

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Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"References: General." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18826.
×
Page 132
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The National Children's Study (NCS) was authorized by the Children's Health Act of 2000 and is being implemented by a dedicated Program Office in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The NCS is planned to be a longitudinal observational birth cohort study to evaluate the effects of chronic and intermittent exposures on child health and development in the U.S.. The NCS would be the first study to collect a broad range of environmental exposure measures for a national probability sample of about 100,000 children, followed from birth or before birth to age 21.

Detailed plans for the NCS were developed by 2007 and reviewed by a National Research Council / Institute of Medicine panel. At that time, sample recruitment for the NCS Main Study was scheduled to begin in 2009 and to be completed within about 5 years. However, results from the initial seven pilot locations, which recruited sample cases in 2009-2010, indicated that the proposed household-based recruitment approach would be more costly and time consuming than planned. In response, the Program Office implemented a number of pilot tests in 2011 to evaluate alternative recruitment methods and pilot testing continues to date.

At the request of Congress, The National Children's Study 2014 reviews the revised study design and proposed methodologies for the NCS Main Study. This report assesses the study's plan to determine whether it is likely to produce scientifically sound results that are generalizable to the United States population and appropriate subpopulations. The report makes recommendations about the overall study framework, sample design, timing, content and need for scientific expertise and oversight.

The National Children's Study has the potential to add immeasurably to scientific knowledge about the impact of environmental exposures, broadly defined, on children's health and development in the United States. The recommendations of this report will help the NCS will achieve its intended objective to examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of American children.

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