National Academies Press: OpenBook

Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A: Open Session Agendas

« Previous: 9 Next Steps
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

A

Open Session Agendas

The committee held data gathering sessions that were open to the public in Washington, DC, on December 5, 2013; January 30, 2014; and in Irvine, California, April 2, 2014. The open session agendas are presented below.

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVING THE HEALTH, SAFETY, AND WELL-BEING OF YOUNG ADULTS: OPEN SESSION

Thursday, December 5, 2013
National Academies’ Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 208
Washington, DC

Open Session Goals:

  1. Hold open session with representatives from the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to understand the sponsor perspectives on the study task.
  2. Hold open session to provide an overview of federal policies and programs relevant to the health, safety, and well-being of young adults.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

SPONSOR BRIEFING

Session Objective: To obtain a better understanding of the study background and the sponsors’ charge to the committee.

1:00 PM Welcome and Introductions
Richard Bonnie, Committee Chair
Harrison Foundation Professor of Medicine and Law University of Virginia
1:15 PM Background and Charge to the Committee
Trina Anglin
Director, Adolescent Health
Maternal and Child Health Bureau
Health Resources and Services Administration
Kristin Schubert (by phone)
Team Director and Senior Program Officer
Vulnerable Populations Program
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
1:45 PM Committee Discussion with Sponsors
Richard Bonnie
2:30 PM Break

FEDERAL POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

Session Objective: To provide an overview of selected federal policies and programs relevant to young adults’ health, safety, and well-being. Specific questions to be discussed include

  • What existing federal policies and programs are targeted specifically at young adults?
  • How are young adults impacted by current federal policies and programs, considering those specifically targeted at young adults as well as those applicable to the general population?
  • What are the greatest gaps, challenges, and opportunities?
  • How do the policies and programs for young adults contrast with policies and programs for children and adolescents?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
2:45 PM Welcoming Remarks
Richard Bonnie
2:50 PM Presentations by Representatives of Federal Agencies
Martha Moorehouse
Chair, Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Senior Advisor for the Social Innovation Fund Corporation for National and Community Service
Stephen Cha
Chief Medical Officer
Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Rebecca Flatow
Public Health Analyst
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Erica Zielewski
Social Science Research Analyst
Administration for Children and Families
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Aria Crump
Health Scientist Administrator
Prevention Research Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Jennifer Kemp
Unit Chief, Youth Policy and Performance
Employment and Training Administration
U.S. Department of Labor
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Christopher Arendt
Deputy Director, Accessions Policy
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness
U.S. Department of Defense
4:15 PM Committee Discussion with Representatives of Federal Agencies
Richard Bonnie
4:45 PM Adjourn open session

IMPROVING THE HEALTH, SAFETY, AND WELL-BEING OF YOUNG ADULTS: A WORKSHOP ON STATE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS AND SOCIAL MEDIA AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

January 30, 2014
National Academy of Sciences Building, Room 120
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC

9:00-9:15 AM Welcome
Richard Bonnie, Committee Chair
Harrison Foundation Professor of Medicine and Law
University of Virginia

PART 1: STATE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

9:15-10:30 AM Session 1: Innovative State and Local Approaches
Objective: Explore examples of innovative models for supporting young adults’ health, safety, and well-being. Specific questions include
  • How have the models been integrated/coordinated across the various agencies and services that are relevant to young adults’ well-being?
  • How have public-private partnerships been integrated into these models?
  • What are the most promising approaches, and what lessons can be learned about what has not worked well?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
  • What evidence is available to support the approach?
  • What methods have worked well to engage adult agencies that have not traditionally focused on young adults?
  • What steps have been taken to develop a workforce to work with young adults?
Moderator:

Gladys Carrión, Committee Member

Commissioner, Administration for Children’s Services

New York City

Speakers:

Steven A. Reeder

Director, Office of Adult Services

Mental Hygiene Administration

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

David S. Berman

Director, Program Management and Policy

NYC Center for Economic Opportunity

Sam Wood

Special Projects Coordinator for Youth Engagement Programs

Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs and Semira Abdu Kassahun and Paul Rastrelli Former members of the youth advisory group for CO9to25

Kim McGaughey

Three Branch Project Manager

Virginia Department of Social Services

10:30-10:45 AM Break
10:45 AM-12:15 PM Session 2: Overview of State Policies and Programs That Impact Young Adults’ Health, Safety, and Well-Being
Objective: Provide an overview of state policies and programs in various domains that are relevant to
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
young adults’ health, safety, and well-being (e.g., access to and use of health services, substance abuse services, employment support, support for those aging out of foster care, income support), including the general population of young adults and those from at-risk groups. Specific questions include
  • To what extent are states focusing on this age group?
  • What state policies and programs are specifically targeted at young adults? And what state policies and programs are applicable to the general population but have an important impact on young adults?
  • How do states organize services for this age group?
  • What are the greatest gaps and most important opportunities to enhance young adults’ health, safety, and well-being through changes to state policies and programs?
Moderator:

Mark Courtney, Committee Member

Professor, School of Social Service Administration

University of Chicago

Speakers:

Joy Johnson Wilson

Director, Health and Human Services Policy

National Conference of State Legislatures

Alexandra Cawthorne

Senior Policy Analyst

and Meghan Wills

Policy Analyst

Economic, Workforce, and Human Services Division

National Governors Association

Christina M. Crayton

Senior Policy Associate

American Public Human Services Association and Staff Liaison

National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

Susan E. Foster

Vice President and Director of Policy Research and Analysis CASAColumbia®

12:15-1:15 PM Lunch
1:15-2:15 PM Session 3: Implications of Federalism
Objectives: Discuss state and federal roles in young adult services and systems; explore implications of the state-federal relationship; and examine the impact on young adults of variation across states in key policy decisions, such as states’ decision about whether to expand Medicaid or whether to extend foster care to age 21. Specific questions include
  • What data are available, including data collected by the federal government, to assess how these variations impact young adults’ well-being?
  • What is the range of actions (e.g., funding, technical assistance) that the federal government takes or could take for the impacted populations in the different policy contexts created by these decisions? What are the associated implications?
Moderator: Mark Courtney
Speakers:

JooYeun Chang

Associate Commissioner, Children’s Bureau

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Kathleen Nolan

Director of State Policy and Programs

National Association of Medicaid Directors

2:15-2:30 PM Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

PART 2: SOCIAL MEDIA AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

2:30-4:00 PM Session Objectives:
  • Explore how young adults use information technology and social media to influence their health and well-being.
  • Identify and discuss opportunities and challenges in using information technology and social media to enhance young adults’ health, safety, and well-being, with a particular focus on practices that could have a very important impact and those that are “low-hanging fruit.”
  • Explore the trajectory of social media in the near future and possible implications for health.
Moderator:

Kasisomayajula “Vish” Viswanath

Harvard School of Public Health

Speakers:

Gwenn Schurgin O’Keeffe

CEO and Editor-in-Chief, Pediatrics Now

Thomas Goetz

Co-founder, Iodine and Entrepreneur in Residence

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Chris Wegrzyn

Co-founder, BlueLabs

Amy Lin

Deputy Policy and Organizing Director, Young Invincibles

4:00 PM Adjourn public workshop
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

COMMITTEE ON IMPROVING THE HEALTH, SAFETY, AND WELL-BEING OF YOUNG ADULTS: MEETING 3 OPEN SESSION

April 2, 2014
The Beckman Center, Balboa Room
100 Academy Drive, Irvine, CA

Open Session Objectives:

  1. Discuss young adults and the justice system with Vincent Schiraldi, Senior Advisor, New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice.
  2. Receive briefing from Patrice Cromwell of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a new sponsor of this consensus study, on the foundation’s areas of interest.

OPEN SESSION

8:30-8:35 AM PST Welcome
Richard Bonnie, Committee Chair
Harrison Foundation Professor of Medicine and Law
University of Virginia
8:35-8:50 AM PST Young Adults and the Justice System
Vincent Schiraldi (by teleconference)
8:50-9:15 AM PST Committee Discussion with Vincent Schiraldi
9:15-9:25 AM PST Sponsor Briefing
Patrice Cromwell (by teleconference)
9:25-9:45 AM PST Committee Discussion with Sponsor
9:45 AM PST Adjourn open session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 419
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 420
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 421
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 422
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 423
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 424
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 425
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 426
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 427
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Open Session Agendas." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18869.
×
Page 428
Next: Appendix B: Diversity and the Effects of Bias and Discrimination on Young Adults' Health and Well-Being »
Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $77.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Young adulthood - ages approximately 18 to 26 - is a critical period of development with long-lasting implications for a person's economic security, health and well-being. Young adults are key contributors to the nation's workforce and military services and, since many are parents, to the healthy development of the next generation. Although 'millennials' have received attention in the popular media in recent years, young adults are too rarely treated as a distinct population in policy, programs, and research. Instead, they are often grouped with adolescents or, more often, with all adults. Currently, the nation is experiencing economic restructuring, widening inequality, a rapidly rising ratio of older adults, and an increasingly diverse population. The possible transformative effects of these features make focus on young adults especially important. A systematic approach to understanding and responding to the unique circumstances and needs of today's young adults can help to pave the way to a more productive and equitable tomorrow for young adults in particular and our society at large.

Investing in The Health and Well-Being of Young Adults describes what is meant by the term young adulthood, who young adults are, what they are doing, and what they need. This study recommends actions that nonprofit programs and federal, state, and local agencies can take to help young adults make a successful transition from adolescence to adulthood. According to this report, young adults should be considered as a separate group from adolescents and older adults. Investing in The Health and Well-Being of Young Adults makes the case that increased efforts to improve high school and college graduate rates and education and workforce development systems that are more closely tied to high-demand economic sectors will help this age group achieve greater opportunity and success. The report also discusses the health status of young adults and makes recommendations to develop evidence-based practices for young adults for medical and behavioral health, including preventions.

What happens during the young adult years has profound implications for the rest of the life course, and the stability and progress of society at large depends on how any cohort of young adults fares as a whole. Investing in The Health and Well-Being of Young Adults will provide a roadmap to improving outcomes for this age group as they transition from adolescence to adulthood.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!