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3D Printing in Space (2014)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
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A

Committee Biographical Information

ROBERT H. LATIFF, Chair, is president and a consultant of Latiff and Associates. Previously, General Latiff has served as vice president, chief engineer, and technology officer in SAIC’s space and geospatial intelligence business unit. He is retired from the U.S. Air Force as a Major General, with his last assignments at the National Reconnaissance Office as the director for systems engineering and as the director of advanced systems and technology. General Latiff was a career acquisition officer, managing large complex systems such as the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, the Air Force’s airspace management and landing systems, and the Joint Strategic Target Attack Radar System. Dr. Latiff holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in materials science and a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame. He has previously served on the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) National Materials and Manufacturing Board (currently as a member and previously as chair), as a member of the Air Force Studies Board, and as chair of the Committee on Defense Materials, Manufacturing and Infrastructure. He has also served as chair of the Committee on Materials and Manufacturing Sustainability for Department of Defense Systems: A Workshop and the Committee on Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile.

PETER M. BANKS is a partner at Red Planet Capital Partners. Prior to the creation of Red Planet Capital Partners, Dr. Banks was CEO and president of ERIM International, Inc., and partner at XR Ventures, the investment arm of the X-Rite Corporation. Previously, he served as dean of engineering at the University of Michigan and was a faculty member of Stanford University and the University of California. Dr. Banks earned his Ph.D. in physics at Pennsylvania State University following an M.S.E.E. degree from Stanford University. While at Stanford, he led the Space, Telecommunications and Radio Science Laboratory of the Department of Electrical Engineering. He participated in several space shuttle missions as a principal investigator for the Shuttle Electro-Dynamic Tether System and as a co-investigator on the flight of Spacelab-1. He has received the U.S. government’s Distinguished Public Service Medal for his contributions to NASA programs. Dr. Banks is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and served as co-chairman of the NRC’s former Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. He served as the chair of the board of the Universities Space Research Association and on the boards of a number of start-up companies, including Triformix (Santa Rosa, California) and HandyLab (Ann Arbor, Michigan). Dr. Banks has advised the Euro-America funds and various federal agencies for work related to defense, space exploration, and national economic security. He has served on the NRC’s Report Review Committee and the Committee on Assessment of NASA Laboratory Capabilities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×

ANDREW S. BICOS is director of enterprise manufacturing technology in the Office of the CTO at Boeing Company. Dr. Bicos is responsible for developing the enterprise strategy for all manufacturing research and development (R&D) at Boeing and managing the portfolio of activities that develop and transition technologies and processes into Boeing’s factories and wide array of products, focusing on research into composites, automated and robotic fabrication and assembly, additive manufacturing, and factory ergonomics and worker safety. Prior to this assignment, he was the director for enterprise structures technology, and before that he was director of Phantom Works’ materials, structures, and manufacturing technology thrust. Dr. Bicos has published more than 20 technical papers and articles on innovative composites, adaptive structures, and vibration reduction technologies. He has held positions on the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Structural Dynamics and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Adaptive Structures and Material Systems technical committees and is a former chair of the ASME Aerospace Division. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA. Dr. Bicos is currently the chair of the ASME Aerospace R&T Task Force and is the Boeing executive focal for ASME and sits on the ASME Industry Advisory Board where he is the chair of the executive committee. Dr. Bicos is also the Boeing executive focal for California State University, Los Angeles. He has a Ph.D. in aeronautical engineering from Stanford and an M.B.A. from University of California, Los Angeles.

ELIZABETH R. CANTWELL is the director for economic development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She previously served as the deputy associate laboratory director for the National Security Directorate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to joining Oak Ridge, Dr. Cantwell was the division leader for the International, Space, and Response Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Her career began in building life-support systems for human spaceflight missions with NASA. She received an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.B.A. in finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Cantwell has extensive NRC experience, including current memberships on the Space Studies Board and the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences Committee; co-chair of the Committee on Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space; and member of the Committee on NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, the Review of NASA Strategic Roadmaps: Space Station Panel, the Committee on Technology for Human/Robotic Exploration and Development of Space, and the Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space.

RAVI B. DEO is president of EMBR, a small business specializing in the design and manufacturing technology development of composite structures. He has worked as a program and functional manager for government sponsored projects on cryotanks, integrated system health management, aerospace structures, materials, subsystems, avionics, thermal protection systems, and software development. He has extensive experience in road-mapping technologies, program planning, technical program execution, scheduling, budgeting, proposal preparation, and business management of technology development contracts. Among his significant accomplishments are the NASA-funded SLI, NGLT, OSP, and High Speed Research programs where he was responsible for the development of multidisciplinary technologies. Dr. Deo is the author of more than 50 technical publications and is the editor of one book. He has served on the NRC steering committee for NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities and on Panel C: Structures and Materials of the Steering Committee on Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics and Panel J: High-Energy Power and Propulsion and In-space Transportation of the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps. He has also served on the Scientific Advisory Board to the Air Force Research Laboratories. He was formerly director of the Technology, Space Systems Market Segment at Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Integrated Systems Sector through 2008. Dr. Deo received his bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay, India, and his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. He is a current member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.

JOHN W. HINES is an independent consultant and senior technology advisor specializing in the areas of space technologies, medical and biological technologies, technology aggregation, and technology program/project management. He recently retired as the chief technical officer for the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). In that capacity, he identified, defined, developed, and integrated transformational space technologies for NASA and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×

national goals and objectives through the ARC Office of the Center Director and the NASA chief technologist. Prior to this, Mr. Hines was chief technologist in the ARC Engineering Directorate, and before that he was deputy chief and chief technologist for the Small Spacecraft Division. He has more than 40 years of combined NASA, Air Force, and research center experience in biological and biomedical technology development, satellite/spaceflight hardware development, electronic systems engineering, program/project management, advanced technology assessment and development, and technology/program advocacy. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Tuskegee University and a M.S. in biomedical and electrical engineering from Stanford University.

BHAVYA LAL is a research staff member at the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) where her research and analysis focuses on space technology and policy and is frequently incorporated in national policy documents. Recent and ongoing projects include supporting the Office of Science and Technology Policy in developing a national space technology strategy, improving detection of near Earth objects, documenting global trends in space, and examining recent commercial activities in space including their legal ramifications related to the Outer Space Treaty. Before joining STPI, Dr. Lal was president of C-STPS, LLC, a science and technology policy research and consulting firm in Waltham, Massachusetts. Prior to that, she was the director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Studies at Abt Associates, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Lal holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an M.S. from MIT’s Technology and Policy Program, and a Ph.D. from the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration (concentration in science and technology policy) at George Washington University.

SANDRA H. MAGNUS is the executive director of the AIAA. Selected to the NASA Astronaut Corps in April 1996, Dr. Magnus flew in space on the STS-112 space shuttle mission in 2002 and on the final space shuttle flight, STS-135, in 2011. In addition, she flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on STS-126 in November 2008, served as flight engineer and science officer on Expedition 18, and returned home on STS-119 after 4½ months on board. Following her assignment on the ISS, Dr. Magnus served at NASA Headquarters in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Her last duty at NASA, after STS-135, was as the deputy chief of the Astronaut Office. While at NASA, Dr. Magnus worked extensively with the international community, including the European Space Agency and the National Space Development Agency of Japan, as well as with Brazil on facility-type payloads. She also spent time in Russia developing and integrating operational products and procedures for the ISS. Before joining NASA, Dr. Magnus worked for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Company as a stealth engineer. While at McDonnell Douglas, she worked on internal R&D and on the Navy’s A-12 Attack Aircraft program studying the effectiveness of radar signature reduction techniques. Dr. Magnus has received numerous awards, including the NASA Space Flight Medal, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the “40 at 40 Award” (given to former collegiate women athletes to recognize the impact of Title IX). Dr. Magnus has an M.S. in electrical engineering from Missouri University of Science and Technology and a Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology for materials science and engineering.

THOMAS E. MAULTSBY is the founder and president of Rubicon, LLC, a referral-based aerospace and technology consulting company. Mr. Maultsby has more than 44 years of space and technology experience in a variety of government and industry positions. His current focus is on space studies and analyses and independent program reviews. Past activities include space shuttle operations at NASA Headquarters, expendable launch operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base, satellite production and test operations, development and acquisition of nuclear treaty monitoring systems, and advanced technology development and insertion. His launch vehicle experience includes the space shuttle, Titan, Delta, Atlas, and Sea Launch. He has led or participated in several senior-level program reviews, including space shuttle operations for the NASA administrator, the Cassini program for the director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Defense Science Board Task Force on Space Superiority, and the NRC review of the NASA Communications Program. Mr. Maultsby has been a board member and chairman of the board of the Security Affairs Support Association (now the Intelligence and National Security Alliance), a member of the AIAA Space Transportation Technical Committee, and a member of the AeroAstro board of directors. He is a co-founder of the Small Payload Ride Share Association and organizes the programs for the annual conferences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×

Mr. Maultsby is an associate fellow of the AIAA. He has an M.S. in engineering from the University of Louisville and an M.S. in systems management from the University of Southern California. He has served on the NRC’s Committee to Review NASA’s Space Communication Program.

MICHAEL T. McGRATH is the engineering director at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and a professor adjunct in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His experience in mechanical design for space began at LASP with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer for Pioneer Venus and the Photopolarimeter for Voyager. He was technical program manager for the Solar Mesospheric Explorer instrument module and spectrometers. He then joined the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research with roles in group and section management that included instrument development for the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, the development of the SPARTAN 201 White Light Coronagraph, and management of the successful repair-in-space of the Solar Maximum Mission Coronagraph/Polarimeter. While there he supported two successful expeditions to photograph total eclipses in Indonesia and the Philippines. He was the U.S. project manager supporting the successful collaborative proposal for the US/UK HIRDLS project. He then returned to LASP as mechanical engineering manager to oversee the development of the CASSINI UVIS instrument currently at Saturn and the TIMED pointing platform. He architected the design of the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer spacecraft, supported the Spectral Intensity Monitor and Total Intensity Monitor instrument developments for the Solar and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission, and then as engineering director, along with responsibility for all projects in LASP engineering, was project manager for NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere Small Explorer mission that is currently in extended mission. Mr. McGrath has 40 years of experience in the development of sensor and instrument systems for NASA’s sounding rocket, Earth, and planetary programs. He has received 13 NASA Group Achievement Awards and served on NASA’s Technology Management Working Group and NASA’s Science Definition Team for Student Collaborations. As professor adjunct he teaches Introduction to Engineering Projects in the school of engineering’s Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory—recipient of the Gordon Prize for innovative curriculum development. For two decades he has taught a graduate class in aerospace engineering in spacecraft design. He has a B.S. in engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

LYLE H. SCHWARTZ is a retired director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research where he had responsibility for the basic research program of the Air Force. He began his career as a professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University where he also became director of the Materials Research Center. He later became director of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology where he was responsible for management of the R&D agenda for metals, ceramics, polymers, magnetic materials, and development and standardization of techniques for materials characterization. Dr. Schwartz subsequently assumed responsibility for basic research on structural materials of interest to the U.S. Air Force, in addition to the areas of propulsion, aeromechanics, and aerodynamics. His current interests include government policy for R&D and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education in grades 6-12 via materials science/technology. Dr. Schwartz received both his B.S. in engineering and his Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. He is a member of the NAE and has served on numerous NRC committees and boards, including as vice chair of the National Materials Advisory Board, as chair of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Advisory Board, and as a member of the Air Force Studies Board. Recent NRC committee membership included the following studies: Manufacturing Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Best Practices in Assessment of Research and Development Organizations, and Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and Its Strategy to Meet Those Needs.

IVAN E. SUTHERLAND is a visiting scientist at Portland State University and where he works in the Asynchronous Research Center that he founded with Marly Roncken in 2008. His research has focused on the design of self-timed or asynchronous computer circuits and computer architecture, and his interests include pursuing creative contributions in computer science and computer graphics. Dr. Sutherland is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the NAE. He is the 1988 recipient of the Turing award and the 2012 recipient of the Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology. He is author of more than 60 patents, as well as numerous papers. Dr. Sutherland

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×

received a Ph.D. from MIT in electrical engineering, and he holds honorary degrees from Harvard University, the University of North Carolina, the University of Utah, and Carnegie Mellon University. He has served on the NRC’s Committee on High Performance Computing and Communications: Status of a Major Initiative and NRC’s Selection Committee for the Greatest Engineering Achievements of the 20th Century.

RYAN WICKER is a professor of mechanical engineering and director and founder of the W.M. Keck Center for 3D Innovation at the University of Texas, El Paso, where he also holds the endowed Mr. and Mrs. MacIntosh Murchison Chair I in Engineering. The Keck Center represents a world-class research facility that focuses on the use and development of additive manufacturing technologies for fabricating 3D objects that are plastic, metal, ceramic, bio-compatible materials, composite materials, or that contain electronics. Major research efforts are underway at the Keck Center in the areas of additive manufacturing technology development; closed-loop process control strategies for additive manufacturing; additive manufacturing of various powder metal alloy systems; and 3D structural electronics in which electronics, and thus intelligence, are fabricated within additive manufacturing-fabricated mechanical structures. Dr. Wicker received degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin (B.S.) and Stanford University (M.S., Ph.D.).

PAUL K. WRIGHT is the director for Center for Information Technology in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) at University of California, Berkeley. CITRIS serves four University of California campuses and hosts many multidisciplinary projects on large societal problems, including healthcare, services, and intelligent infrastructures such as energy, water, and sustainability. Dr. Wright teaches in the Mechanical Engineering Department, where he holds the A. Martin Berlin Chair. He also serves as co-director of the Berkeley Manufacturing Institute and co-director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center. From 1995 to 2005 he served as co-chair of the Management of Technology Program (a joint program with the Haas School of Business). His research and teaching are in high-tech product design and rapid manufacturing. Currently, he and his colleagues are designing and prototyping wireless systems for “Demand Response Power Management” throughout California, funded by the Public Interest Energy Research program of the California Energy Commission. Previously he served in faculty positions at New York University and Carnegie Mellon University. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in industrial metallurgy from the University of Birmingham. Dr. Wright is a member of the NAE, and he served on the NRC’s Committee on 21st Century Manufacturing: The Role of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Panel on Manufacturing Engineering—2010.

Staff

DWAYNE A. DAY, Study Director, a senior program officer for the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB), has a Ph.D. in political science from the George Washington University. Dr. Day joined the NRC as a program officer for the Space Studies Board (SSB). Before this, he served as an investigator for the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, was on the staff of the Congressional Budget Office, and also worked for the Space Policy Institute at the George Washington University. He has held Guggenheim and Verville fellowships and was an associate editor of the German spaceflight magazine Raumfahrt Concrete, in addition to writing for such publications as Novosti Kosmonavtiki (Russia), Spaceflight, and Space Chronicle (United Kingdom). He has served as study director for several NRC reports, including Space Radiation Hazards and the Vision for Space Exploration (2006), Grading NASA’s Solar System Exploration Program: A Midterm Review (2008), and Opening New Frontiers in Space: Choices for the Next New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity (2008).

ERIK SVEDBERG is currently a senior program officer of the National Materials and Manufacturing Board at the National Academies. In this role, he works with experts from across the nation to develop, negotiate, and oversee scientific and technical advisory studies for federal agencies to address questions about materials science, manufacturing, and engineering design. His activities at the National Academies have included work as a study director for studies on research opportunities in science and engineering, materials needs and R&D strategy for future propulsion systems, grand challenges in corrosion research, opportunities in protection materials, triennial

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×

review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, and optics and photonics. Dr. Svedberg has a decade of industry experience with both small and large companies in the materials science area and was also a guest researcher at NIST for several years. He has been awarded and overseen many research grants and has published more than 80 scientific articles, been granted two patents, and his work is cited more 500 times. He holds both a master’s and Ph.D. degree from the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology at Linköping University in Sweden and was the year 2000 recipient of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications Welch Scholarship.

ANDREA M. REBHOLZ, program coordinator, joined the ASEB in 2009. She began her career at the National Academies in October 2005 as a senior program assistant for the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation. Prior to the Academies, she worked in the communications department of a D.C.based think tank. Ms. Rebholz graduated from George Mason University’s New Century College in 2003 with a B.A. in integrative studies-event management. She earned the Certified Meeting Professional designation in 2013 and has more than 11 years of experience in event planning.

MICHAEL H. MOLONEY is the director for Space and Aeronautics at the SSB and the ASEB of the National Research Council of the U.S. National Academies. Since joining the ASEB/SSB, Dr. Moloney has overseen the production of more than 40 reports, including four decadal surveys—in astronomy and astrophysics, planetary science, life and microgravity science, and solar and space physics—a review of the goals and direction of the U.S. human exploration program, a prioritization of NASA space technology roadmaps, as well as reports on issues such as NASA’s Strategic Direction, orbital debris, the future of NASA’s astronaut corps, and NASA’s flight research program. Before joining the SSB and ASEB in 2010, Dr. Moloney was associate director of the BPA and study director for the decadal survey for astronomy and astrophysics (Astro2010). Since joining the NRC in 2001, Dr. Moloney has served as a study director at the National Materials Advisory Board, the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design, and the Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies. Dr. Moloney has served as study director or senior staff for a series of reports on subject matters as varied as quantum physics, nanotechnology, cosmology, the operation of the nation’s helium reserve, new anti-counterfeiting technologies for currency, corrosion science, and nuclear fusion. In addition to his professional experience at the National Academies, Dr. Moloney has more than 7 years’ experience as a foreign-service officer for the Irish government—including serving at the Irish Embassy in Washington and the Irish Mission to the United Nations in New York. A physicist, Dr. Moloney did his Ph.D. work at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. He received his undergraduate degree in experimental physics at University College Dublin, where he was awarded the Nevin Medal for Physics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2014. 3D Printing in Space. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18871.
×
Page 90
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Additive manufacturing has the potential to positively affect human spaceflight operations by enabling the in-orbit manufacture of replacement parts and tools, which could reduce existing logistics requirements for the International Space Station and future long-duration human space missions. The benefits of in-space additive manufacturing for robotic spacecraft are far less clear, although this rapidly advancing technology can also potentially enable space-based construction of large structures and, perhaps someday, substantially in the future, entire spacecraft. Additive manufacturing can also help to reimagine a new space architecture that is not constrained by the design and manufacturing confines of gravity, current manufacturing processes, and launch-related structural stresses.

The specific benefits and potential scope of additive manufacturing remain undetermined. The realities of what can be accomplished today, using this technology on the ground, demonstrate the substantial gaps between the vision for additive manufacturing in space and the limitations of the technology and the progress that has to be made to develop it for space use.

3D Printing in Space evaluates the prospects of in-space additive manufacturing. This report examines the various technologies available and currently in development, and considers the possible impacts for crewed space operations and robotic spacecraft operations. Ground-based additive manufacturing is being rapidly developed by industry, and 3D Printing in Space discusses government-industry investments in technology development. According to this report, the International Space Station provides an excellent opportunity for both civilian and military research on additive manufacturing technology. Additive manufacturing presents potential opportunities, both as a tool in a broad toolkit of options for space-based activities and as a potential paradigm-changing approach to designing hardware for in-space activities. This report makes recommendations for future research, suggests objectives for an additive manufacturing roadmap, and envisions opportunities for cooperation and joint development.

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