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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: The Bridging Leadership Framework." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
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Appendix F

The Bridging Leadership Framework
1

Bridging Leadership is the type of leadership that is appropriate in promoting multi-stakeholder processes to address societal inequities. It is about leading collaborative action to bring about social change. The leadership acts involves three main segments: Building Ownership of the response, Developing Co-Ownership with other stakeholders and together engaging in the Co-Creation of a new reality (see Figure F-1).

BRIDGING LEADERSHIP FRAMEWORK

The bridging leader whose values and principles compel him to make a personal response to address inequities and societal divides recognizes that the complexity of the problem can only be solved by convening the stakeholders to the divide. (Ownership)

Through a process of dialogue and engagement, the stakeholders arrive at a common vision and collective response to the situation. (Co-ownership)

The stakeholders then adopt a social innovation that leads to the societal outcome, and carries it out through new institutional arrangements. The bridging leader and the coalition of stakeholders ensure that these institutional arrangements have clear and measurable goals with the required capability and resources to demonstrate results. They regularly review their

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1 Reprinted with permission from the Asian Institute of Management TeaM Energy Center for Bridging Leadership. Originally published at http://bridgingleadership.aim.edu/about/the-center.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: The Bridging Leadership Framework." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
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image

FIGURE F-1 The Bridging Leadership Framework.
SOURCE: Asian Institute of Management, n.d.

progress vis-à-vis the desired societal outcome and assess the individual and collective roles and accountabilities in the process. (Co-creation)

Over time, these arrangements become formal processes that lead to a reform-conducive policy environment and responsive programs and services. Other stakeholders are invited to the coalition regularly, and new bridging leaders are developed to sustain the transformation process toward societal equity.

REFERENCE

Asian Institute of Management TeaM Energy Center for Bridging Leadership. n.d. Bridging leadership framework. Makati City, Philippines. http://bridgingleadership.aim.edu/about/the-center (accessed September 24, 2014).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: The Bridging Leadership Framework." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
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Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: The Bridging Leadership Framework." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
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There is growing evidence from developed and developing countries that community-based approaches are effective in improving the health of individuals and populations. This is especially true when the social determinants of health are considered in the design of the community-based approach. With an aging population and an emphasis on health promotion, the United States is increasingly focusing on community-based health and health care. Preventing disease and promoting health calls for a holistic approach to health interventions that rely more heavily upon interprofessional collaborations. However, the financial and structural design of health professional education remains siloed and largely focused on academic health centers for training. Despite these challenges, there are good examples of interprofessional, community-based programs and curricula for educating health professionals.

In May 2014, members of the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education came together to substantively delve into issues affecting the scale-up and spread of health professional education in communities. Participants heard a wide variety of individual accounts from innovators about work they are undertaking and opportunities for education with communities. In presenting a variety of examples that range from student community service to computer modeling, the workshop aimed to stimulate discussions about how educators might better integrate education with practice in communities. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education summarizes the presentations and discussion of this event.

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