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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
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Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

SCALING UP BEST PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION1

A Public Workshop of the Global Forum on
Innovation in Health Professional Education
May 1–2, 2014

The Keck Center of the National Academies
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1: MAY 1, 2014

Workshop Objectives:
  • To provide a framework for a common understanding of the responsibilities of health professions, institutions, and students to the communities they serve.
  • To explore how common terminology is interpreted within various community health settings: What is community, diversity, social accountability, ethnicity, culture, and equity? Who are the health workers and health providers?
  • To identify and discuss competencies needed to engage with communities for improving health and health outcomes: What knowledge, attitudes, and skill sets are needed? How might these be imparted through learning? Where along the pipeline from education to practice should efforts be concentrated?

_____________

1 There are many opinions on what constitutes “community-based” health professional education (HPE). For the purposes of this workshop, community-based HPE includes education and training that takes place anywhere outside of the hospital setting (e.g., health clinics, churches, schools, health departments, and government offices).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
  • To identify gaps and best practices in scaling up community-based experiential learning using incentives and tools such as payment structures, accreditation/licensure/certification, policy, tracking, and social accountability.
  • To explore a wide variety of models of community-based health professional education.
8:30am BREAKFAST
9:00am Welcome and orientation to the workshop

- Warren Newton and Susan Scrimshaw, Workshop Co-Chairs

SESSION I: ESTABLISHING A FRAMEWORK

Objective: To provide a framework for a common understanding of (1) the community context of health; (2) terminology; and (3) responsibilities of health professions, institutions, and students to the communities they serve.
Moderator: Susan Scrimshaw

9:10am Responsibilities of and for the community

- Jehan El-Bayoumi, Rodham Institute out of George Washington University

Q&A
10:00am What I wish the health professional knew: Views from the street

- Lisa Fitzpatrick, Daveda Hudson, and Marjorie Cooper-Smith, Care Center

10:15am Facilitated table discussions. Question: Given what you heard, how would you educate health professionals in order to develop these qualities or skills?
10:25am Reporting back
10:45am BREAK
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
SESSION II: SKILL SETS AND PEDAGOGY
11:15am Competencies for work in communities
Objective: To identify and discuss competencies needed to engage with communities for improving health and health outcomes: What knowledge and skill sets are needed? How might these be imparted through learning? Facilitator: Beth Velde, Public Service and Community Relations, East Carolina University Speakers:

- Jusie Lydia Siega-Sur, University of the Philippines Manila School of Health Sciences

- Jennifer Morton, University of New England

Q&A
12:15pm LUNCH
1:15pm Community-based HPE pedagogy: Framing foundational issues through debate
Objective: To debate the pros and cons of how and when to expose health professional students to community-based experiences
Three short debates with facilitated discussion Facilitator: Warren Newton

- Admission Versus Training (Rick Kellerman and Sarita Verma)
Voting Proposition: Nature versus nurture: Health profession educational institutions should place more emphasis on admissions than in training specific competencies during the educational program.

- Longitudinal Versus Block (Lucinda Maine and Holly Wise)
Voting Proposition: Health professions education of the future should promote the use of longitudinal clinical education experiences to the advantage of patients, learners, sites, and academic programs.

- Virtual Versus Real (Pam Jeffries and Eric Holmboe) Voting Proposition: A priority in the development of health professions education should be development of robust simulations that can train and assess the variety and complexity of behaviors necessary to implement the Triple Aim.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
2:35pm Introduction to spreading and scaling up community-based HPE

- Warren Newton

2:45pm BREAK
SESSION III-A: SPREAD AND SCALE-UP
Objective: To discuss methods of improving population health outcomes by identifying and addressing gaps and by scaling up best practices in community-based experiential learning, and where along the pipeline from education to practice efforts might be concentrated.
3:15pm Spreading community-based innovations
Moderator: Zohray Talib, Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) Coordinating Center, George Washington University
Speakers:

- Scott Hinkle, National Board for Certified Counselors’ Mental Health Facilitator Program

- Ruth Wageman, ReThink Health

Q&A
4:15pm Technology and innovations in community-based HPE
Moderator: Gillian Barclay, Aetna Foundation

- Jeffrey Brenner, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers

- Sarah Freeman, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

Q&A
5:30pm Closing remarks and adjournment

- Susan Scrimshaw

5:30pm Poster session and reception (Keck Atrium)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
DAY 2: MAY 2, 2014
8:00am BREAKFAST
8:30am Welcome back and instructions

- Warren Newton, Workshop Co-Chair

SESSION III-B: SPREAD AND SCALE-UP OF IPE
8:45am Breakout groups:
Objective: To hold focused discussions on increasing the number of available interprofessional, community-based learning experiences through (1) scale-up of current, successful programs and (2) the introduction of new opportunities for community-based experiential learning.
  1. Community colleges: A model for spreading community-based IPE.
    Leader: Donna Meyer, National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing
    Assisted by: Poonam Jain, SIU School of Dental Medicine
  2. Scaling up community-based, interprofessional, faculty-run and faculty-assisted student-run clinics.
    Leader: Kathy Kolasa, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
    Assisted by: Riva Touger-Decker, Nutritional Sciences/Rutgers University; Rick Valachovic, American Dental Education Association; and Eileen Moore, Georgetown University
  3. Interprofessional education: Preparing law enforcement and health professions together.
    Leader: Virginia Adams, National League for Nursing
    Assisted by: Joseph Morquecho, DC Metropolitan Police Department Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit; and Marsha Regenstein, George Washington University
Main room: Innovations in community-based HPE
A webcast of community-based HPE examples (presentations are by invitation only)
Moderator: Stephen Shannon, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
10:45am BREAK
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
SESSION IV: IMPACTING OUTCOMES
11:10am How do we improve community outcomes?
Introduction and remarks by Afaf Meleis, Global Forum Co-Chair

- Ruth Lubic, DC Developing Families Center

11:30am Breakout group report back and discussion
Moderator: Marietjie de Villiers, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
1 – Group 1 leader: Donna Meyer
2 – Group 2 leader: Kathy Kolasa
3 – Group 3 leader: Virginia Adams
12:15pm Spreading innovations in HPE: Lessons learned over the last 2 days
Objective: To discuss how the ideas presented in the workshop could be taken forward in an organized, systematic fashion that could enhance opportunities for education and training in communities that benefit both the community and the learner
Facilitator: Warren Newton, Workshop Co-Chair
Facilitated table discussions:
What are the three most important lessons learned for health professional engagement of and for the community?
What are the three most important lessons learned for how these can be accomplished through HPE?
1:00pm LUNCH AND ADJOURNMENT
Room 100 will remain open until 5:00 pm for networking opportunities.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18973.
×
Page 110
Next: Appendix B: Abstracts of the May 2, 2014, Webcast Session »
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There is growing evidence from developed and developing countries that community-based approaches are effective in improving the health of individuals and populations. This is especially true when the social determinants of health are considered in the design of the community-based approach. With an aging population and an emphasis on health promotion, the United States is increasingly focusing on community-based health and health care. Preventing disease and promoting health calls for a holistic approach to health interventions that rely more heavily upon interprofessional collaborations. However, the financial and structural design of health professional education remains siloed and largely focused on academic health centers for training. Despite these challenges, there are good examples of interprofessional, community-based programs and curricula for educating health professionals.

In May 2014, members of the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education came together to substantively delve into issues affecting the scale-up and spread of health professional education in communities. Participants heard a wide variety of individual accounts from innovators about work they are undertaking and opportunities for education with communities. In presenting a variety of examples that range from student community service to computer modeling, the workshop aimed to stimulate discussions about how educators might better integrate education with practice in communities. Building Health Workforce Capacity Through Community-Based Health Professional Education summarizes the presentations and discussion of this event.

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