National Academies Press: OpenBook

Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary (2015)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

« Previous: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

Gillian Barclay, D.D.S., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., is the vice president of the Aetna Foundation. In her role she leads the development, execution, and evaluation of the foundation’s national and international grant programs and cultivates new projects within its three focus areas: health equity, health care innovations, and healthy eating and active living. As part of her responsibilities, she is a frequent spokesperson for the foundation, presenting its work and the accomplishments of its grantees to various audiences. Prior to joining the Aetna Foundation, Dr. Barclay was an advisor at the regional office of the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization. There, she managed a portfolio of initiatives that focused special attention on building health leadership, health care, and public health systems. Previously she was the evaluation manager of health programs for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, where she was responsible for the impact of the foundation’s investments to improve healthy equity, increase the quality of health and health care, and enhance community health and wellness. Dr. Barclay is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities, its Roundtable on Population Health Improvement, and its Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education. She is also a board member of the National Education Association/Health Information Network and the Walter Rodney Foundation. She has taught at the Harvard School of Public Health and at Hunter College of the City University of New York, has published in peer-reviewed journals, and has been a frequent presenter at health con-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

ferences in the United States and around the world. Dr. Barclay earned her doctorate of dental surgery at the University of Detroit Mercy and completed her residency at New York Hospital Medical Center. She holds a doctorate in public health from Harvard University and a master’s of public health from the University of Michigan. Her undergraduate work was at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica.

Charles Basch, Ph.D., is the Richard March Hoe Professor of Health and Education at Teacher College, Columbia University. He was born and raised in the Bronx (New York). He specializes in planning and evaluating health education programs for urban minority populations to reduce health and educational disparities. His work has been diverse with respect to population groups (ranging from young children to older adults), disease topics (AIDS, cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and eye disease), and behaviors (vision, diet, physical activity, and screening), but it has had a common theme of translating research into practice. The health education programs he has developed and evaluated are philosophically grounded in informed voluntary decision making and rely heavily on building strong interpersonal relationships. His evaluative research has been collaboratively conducted with self-insured unions, hospitals, community-based clinics, and schools. Dr. Basch’s main scholarly interests are improving understanding about (1) health-related decision making, (2) the dissemination and implementation of effective health-related programs and policies, and (3) the influence of health factors on educational outcomes in urban minority youth. He teaches courses related to epidemiology, planning, and evaluation. During his past 25 years at Teachers College, he has directed approximately $20 million of grant-funded research and program development (primarily supported by the National Institutes of Health). His work has appeared in more than 100 publications.

James Bender, M.H.S., M.F.A., CHES, is the executive director of the National Education Association Health Information Network (NEA HIN). Prior to joining the NEA HIN, Mr. Bender served as senior associate at Booz Allen, where he led the marketing communications practice for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Earlier in his career, he was deputy director for the Center for Health Communication at the Academy for Educational Development, where he helped direct the start-up and implementation of We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity & Nutrition), funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a national effort designed to give parents, caregivers, and entire communities ways to help children 8 to 13 years old maintain a healthy weight. Mr. Bender also worked to create resources for diverse organiza-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

tions, including the School Nutrition Association, the CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health, and the National Coalition for Food-Safe Schools. A certified health education specialist, Mr. Bender holds a master of health sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, a master of fine arts from Yale University’s School of Drama, and a bachelor of science from Northeastern University. Mr. Bender was a secondary school classroom teacher for 2 years in the East African nation of Malawi and has been a long-time Sunday school teacher for elementary and middle school children.

Laurie Miller Brotman, Ph.D., is the Bezos Family Foundation Professor of Early Childhood Development at New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center and a professor of population health, child and adolescent psychiatry, and psychiatry. She is the director of the Center for Early Childhood Health and Development (CEHD) in the Division of Health and Behavior in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center. Dr. Brotman earned a B.S. in human development and family studies from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in clinical developmental psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She completed a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) postdoctoral research fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at Columbia University and has been a tenured faculty member at NYU since 1998. At NYU, Dr. Brotman currently serves as a member of the School of Medicine’s Committee on Appointments and Promotions, the Community Engagement and Population Health Research Faculty Steering Committee of the Clinical Translational Science Institute, and the Coordinating Council of the NYU Langone Medical Center’s Community Service Plan. Dr. Brotman served two terms on the board of directors of the Society for Prevention Research and was awarded the society’s prestigious 2009 Community, Culture, and Prevention Science Award. In 2009 Dr. Brotman was named to the YWCA Academy of Women Leaders. In 2014 Dr. Brotman was awarded the Helen Bull Vandervort Distinguished Alumni Award, the highest honor bestowed on a human ecology alumni of Cornell University who has attained outstanding success and distinction in his or her chosen profession and made significant contributions to his or her profession and community. Dr. Brotman’s work focuses on promoting family engagement and high-quality home and classroom environments to support child self-regulation and early learning. Her work has the potential to contribute to national efforts to eliminate the achievement gap and health disparities for poor minority children. The National Institutes of Health has supported Dr. Brotman’s prevention trials and follow-up studies since 1997. Dr. Brotman is currently principal investigator on grants from NIMH, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Institute

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

of Education Sciences, and the New York State Office of Mental Health. Dr. Brotman is the developer of ParentCorps, a population-level, universal intervention that aims to attenuate the adverse effects of poverty on child health and development. She and her team within CEHD are working with local and state partners to support schools and early learning programs to implement ParentCorps with the aim of promoting academic achievement, mental health, and physical health among children living in disadvantaged communities.

Norris Dickard, A.L.M., directs the Healthy Students Group at the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Safe and Healthy Students. The group administers a $134 million investment portfolio of grant programs and other activity related to school-based substance abuse and violence prevention, mental health and counseling services, health care, and physical education. He is also the education department’s lead on numerous interagency working groups including the National Prevention Council, the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, and the Demand Reduction Group at the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy. Mr. Dickard has more than 25 years of experience in public policy and public administration. Before rejoining the education department in 2008, after 7 prior years of service as a senior policy advisor during the Clinton administration, Mr. Dickard was a fellow at The Brookings Institution. He has also worked as an administrator at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, as the director of public policy at the Benton Foundation, and as a principal at the Lewin Group (then a management consulting division of the Fortune 1000 company Quintiles). Mr. Dickard started his career as a middle school science teacher and earned a master’s degree in government at Harvard.

Allison Gertel-Rosenberg, M.S., has spent her career addressing some of the most important and challenging issues in public health. As director of national prevention and practice for Nemours National Office of Policy and Prevention, she is responsible for leading the office’s efforts to spread and scale promising practices and strategic prevention initiatives designed to curb childhood obesity on a national scale and for initiatives that involve the intersection of population health and clinical care. These efforts have included the highly successful Let’s Move! Child Care; Healthy Kids, Healthy Future; and the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative initiative with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ms. Gertel-Rosenberg’s involvement has run the gamut from securing funding for these collaborations, as she has leveraged $47 million in grants, to playing a critical role in planning and implementing the strategic and operational measures necessary to

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

make them successful. Ms. Gertel-Rosenberg is widely recognized as an expert on public health and population health and has presented at numerous national conferences on the value of investment in childhood health, patterns of drug abuse, assessments of the efficacy of prevention programs, youth smoking cessation, and the development of statewide anti-tobacco media campaigns. In addition, she has published a number of articles on children’s health issues. Before joining Nemours in 2006, Ms. Gertel-Rosenberg was the program manager for the Office of Policy Development for the Division of Addiction Services at the New Jersey Department of Human Services. In that position, she was responsible for supervising a staff of researchers engaged in addiction-related research and overseeing treatment-related data collection and analysis. Ms. Gertel-Rosenberg received her M.S. in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health and her B.S. in public health from Rutgers College.

Holly Hunt, M.A., is the chief of the School Health Branch in the Division of Population Health at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The School Health Branch leads chronic disease prevention activities specific to children and adolescents in schools with a focus on obesity prevention, nutrition and physical activity, and tobacco prevention and control. With a long history of working across education and public health agencies, the School Health Branch provides rich partnerships and expertise for implementing public health practices in schools. Ms. Hunt leads innovative projects in research application, evaluation, and program and professional development. Prior to joining the branch, Ms. Hunt served as the deputy director of CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health, where she was responsible for the overall management of division operations and establishing effective working partnerships with key national, federal, and nonprofit organizations working to improve the health of youth. Ms. Hunt joined CDC in 1997 and has served as the associate director for policy, evaluation, and legislation; director of science education; and the project officer to CDC-funded national, state, and local school health projects. Before joining CDC, Ms. Hunt served for 7 years as an HIV prevention education consultant in the Kentucky Department of Education, responsible for the development and implementation of statewide HIV prevention and school health programs, professional development, and community partnerships to promote the health of school-aged youth. Ms. Hunt holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Valdosta State University and a master of arts degree in industrial and community counseling from Eastern Kentucky University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

George Isham, M.D., M.S., is a senior advisor to HealthPartners, responsible for working with the board of directors and the senior management team on health and quality of care improvement for patients, members, and the community. Dr. Isham is also a senior fellow at the HealthPartners Research Foundation and facilitates forward progress at the intersection of population health research and public policy. Dr. Isham is active nationally and currently co-chairs the National Quality Forum–convened Measurement Application Partnership, chairs the clinical program committee of the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), and is a member of NCQA’s committee on performance measurement. Dr. Isham is the chair of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Roundtable on Health Literacy and has chaired three studies in addition to serving on a number of IOM studies related to health and quality of care. In 2003 Dr. Isham was appointed as a lifetime national associate of the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his contributions to the work of the IOM. He is a former member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Task Force on Community Preventive Services and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and he currently serves on the advisory committee to the director of CDC. His practice experience as a general internist was with the U.S. Navy; at the Freeport Clinic in Freeport, Illinois; and as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison. In 2014 Dr. Isham was elected to the IOM.

Robert Kaplan, Ph.D., became chief science officer at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in May 2014. From February 2011 to April 2014 he worked in the National Institutes of Health Office of the Director as associate director for behavioral and social sciences and director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. Prior to working for government, Dr. Kaplan was a distinguished professor of health services at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and a distinguished professor of medicine at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, where he was principal investigator of the California Comparative Effectiveness and Outcomes Improvement Center. He led the UCLA/ RAND health services training program and the UCLA/RAND Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Prevention Research Center. He was the chair of the Department of Health Services from 2004 to 2009. From 1997 to 2004 he was a professor and the chair of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He is a past president of several organizations, including the American Psychological Association Division of Health Psychology, Section J of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Pacific), the International Society for Quality of Life Research, the Society for Behavioral

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

Medicine, and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He is a past chair of the Behavioral Science Council of the American Thoracic Society. Dr. Kaplan is a former editor-in-chief of two academic journals, Health Psychology and the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. He is the author, co-author, or editor of more than 18 books and more than 500 articles or chapters. His work has been cited in more than 25,000 papers, and the ISI includes him in the listing of the most cited authors in his field (defined as above the 99.5th percentile). In 2005 Dr. Kaplan was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

David Kindig, M.D., Ph.D., received a B.A. from Carleton College in 1962 and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 1968. He completed residency training in social pediatrics at Montefiore Hospital in 1971. From 1980 to 2003 Dr. Kindig served as a professor of preventive medicine/population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin, where he developed a unique distance education graduate degree in medical management. He was the vice chancellor for health sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1980 to 1985, the director of Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center from 1976 to 1980, the deputy director of the Bureau of Health Manpower at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare from 1974 to 1976, and the first medical director of the National Health Services Corps from 1971 to 1973. He was the national president of the Student American Medical Association in 1967–1968. He served as the chair of the federal Council of Graduate Medical Education (1995–1997), the president of the Association for Health Services Research (1997–1998), a ProPAC commissioner (1991–1994), and a senior advisor to Donna Shalala, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993–1995). In 1996 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 2003. He chaired the IOM Committee on Health Literacy from 2002 to 2004, chaired Wisconsin Governor Doyle’s Healthy Wisconsin Taskforce in 2006, and received the 2007 Wisconsin Public Health Association’s Distinguished Service to Public Health Award.

Jeffrey Levi, Ph.D., is the executive director of Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), where he leads the organization’s advocacy efforts on behalf of a modernized public health system. He oversees TFAH’s work on a range of public health policy issues, including implementation of the public health provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and annual reports assessing the nation’s public health preparedness, investment in public health infrastructure, and response to chronic diseases such as obesity. TFAH has led the public health community’s efforts to enact—and now

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

defend—the prevention provisions of the ACA, including the Prevention and Public Health Fund and the new community transformation grants. In January 2011 President Obama appointed Dr. Levi to serve as a member of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. In April 2011 Surgeon General Benjamin appointed him chair of the advisory group. Dr. Levi is also a professor of health policy at George Washington University’s School of Public Health, where his research has focused on HIV/AIDS, Medicaid, and integrating public health with the health care delivery system. In the past he has also served as an associate editor of the American Journal of Public Health and the deputy director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy. Beginning in the early 1980s, he held various leadership positions in the LGBT and HIV communities, helping to frame the early response to the HIV epidemic. Dr. Levi received a B.A. from Oberlin College, an M.A. from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. from George Washington University.

Kent McGuire, Ph.D., is the president and chief executive officer of the Southern Education Foundation (SEF), a public charity headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. SEF focuses on public policy and educational practice from pre-kindergarten to higher education in the southern United States. In its variety of programs and services, SEF has been particularly concerned with questions of equal access to quality education for children and youth and with the participation and success of poor and minority students in postsecondary education. Prior to joining SEF, Dr. McGuire was the dean of the College of Education at Temple University and a professor in the department of educational leadership and policy studies. Before working at Temple, Dr. McGuire was senior vice president at MDRC, where his responsibilities included leadership of the corporation’s education, children, and youth division. From 1998 to 2001 Dr. McGuire served in the Clinton administration as assistant secretary of education, in which job he served as the senior officer for the department’s research and development agency. As the education program officer for the Philadelphia-based Pew Charitable Trusts from 1995 to 1998, he managed Pew’s K–12 grants portfolio. From 1991 to 1995, Dr. McGuire served as education program director for the Eli Lilly Endowment. Dr. McGuire’s current research interests focus on the areas of education administration, education policy, and organizational change. He has been involved in a number of evaluation research initiatives on comprehensive school reform and education finance and school improvement. Dr. McGuire has written and co-authored various policy reports, monographs, book chapters, articles, and papers in professional journals. Dr. McGuire received his doctorate degree in public administration from the University of Colorado Boulder, his master’s degree in education administration and policy from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

Teachers College, Columbia University, and his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Michigan.

Peter R. Orszag, Ph.D., is the vice chairman of corporate and investment banking and the chairman of the Financial Strategy and Solutions Group at Citigroup, Inc. He is also a contributing columnist at Bloomberg View, a distinguished scholar at the New York University School of Law, and an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Prior to joining Citigroup in January 2011, Dr. Orszag served as a distinguished visiting fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a contributing columnist at the New York Times. He previously served as the director of the Office of Management and Budget in the Obama administration, a Cabinet-level position, from January 2009 until July 2010. From January 2007 to December 2008, Dr. Orszag was the director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Under his leadership, the agency significantly expanded its focus on areas such as health care and climate change. Prior to CBO, Dr. Orszag was the Joseph A. Pechman Senior Fellow and the deputy director of economic studies at The Brookings Institution. While at Brookings, he also served as the director of The Hamilton Project, director of the Retirement Security Project, and co-director of the Tax Policy Center. During the Clinton administration, he was a special assistant to the president for economic policy and before that a staff economist and then senior advisor and senior economist at the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Dr. Orszag has also founded and subsequently sold an economics consulting firm. Dr. Orszag graduated summa cum laude in economics from Princeton University and obtained a Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics, which he attended as a Marshall Scholar. He has coauthored or co-edited a number of books, including Protecting the Homeland (2006), Aging Gracefully: Ideas to Improve Retirement Security in America (2006), Saving Social Security: A Balanced Approach (2004), and American Economic Policy in the 1990s (2002). Dr. Orszag serves on the board of directors of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, ideas42, and the Partnership for Public Service. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the Trilateral Commission, The Hamilton Project Advisory Council, and the Marshall Scholarship Alumni Advisory Board, and he holds an honorary doctorate from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Loel S. Solomon, Ph.D., is Kaiser Permanente’s vice president for community health. Previously, he served as the national director of community health initiatives and evaluation at Kaiser Permanente’s Community Benefits Program, a philanthropic venture that sought to improve the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

health of communities through partnerships, education, sharing clinical expertise, research, grants, and services to vulnerable populations. Since he joined the program in 2003, Dr. Solomon has been responsible for a national effort to improve health outcomes in Kaiser Permanente communities by focusing on environmental and policy change. Earlier, Dr. Solomon served as deputy director of the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development for Healthcare Quality and Analysis, where he oversaw hospital outcomes and analyses of racial and ethnic health disparities. Dr. Solomon was also a senior manager at Lewin Group, where he helped design and facilitate community health initiatives sponsored by the United Auto Workers and the automobile industry. Dr. Solomon’s policy experience includes service on U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy’s health staff and former President Bill Clinton’s Task Force on National Healthcare Reform. Dr. Solomon received his Ph.D. in health policy from Harvard University and his master’s in public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of several journal articles and a book chapter.

Kelli O. Thompson, J.D., serves as the director of the Department of Capacity and Knowledge Development (CKD) at Nemours in its Health and Prevention Services division in Delaware. She has more than 20 years of experience in nonprofit management and children’s issues, including leadership with United Cerebral Palsy of Central Pennsylvania as director of childhood programs, Pennsylvania’s Early Childhood Mental Health Project, and other health-related initiatives for children. Ms. Thompson, who joined Nemours in 2008, earned her bachelor’s degree in child development and family resources at West Virginia University and her law degree at Widener University. Ms. Thompson is a past president of the Pennsylvania Early Intervention Providers’ Association. As the director of CKD, she leads a multidisciplinary team of evaluation and research scientists and population health specialists to ensure that their interventions, research, and evaluation work are well-coordinated, useful, ethical, and rigorous. Above all, Ms. Thompson strives to ensure that their work and its results are accessible to the company’s major constituencies. Ms. Thompson holds a leadership role on the evaluation team of the newly received $25 million Delaware-CTR ACCEL grant. In addition, Ms. Thompson serves as an advisory board member on KIDS COUNT in Delaware and as a member of the Delaware Readiness Teams Advisory Committee and the Delaware Early Childhood Council. Most recently she was asked to join the verification and assessment committee within the Delaware Stars for Early Success program. Ms. Thompson’s entire career has revolved around children and providing them the opportunity to reach their fullest potential.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

Steven H. Woolf, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Center on Society and Health and a professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is board certified in family medicine and in preventive medicine and public health. His work has focused on promoting effective health care services and on highlighting the importance of behavioral and social determinants of health, particularly with regard to the role of poverty, education, and racial and ethnic disparities, in determining the health of Americans. In addition to his work as a researcher, he has also been involved with health policy issues. Dr. Woolf recently chaired the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee that authored the report U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health. He has served as science adviser, member, and senior adviser to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. He is a member of the IOM. He has an M.D. from Emory University and an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University.

Terri D. Wright, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Center for School, Health, and Education in the Division of Public Health Policy and Practice at the American Public Health Association (APHA). She provides leadership related to the strategic development and integration of public health in school-based health care and education. Prior to joining APHA in 2010, she served as a program director for health policy for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in Battle Creek, Michigan, for 12 years. In that capacity Dr. Wright developed and reviewed the foundation’s health programming priorities and initiatives, evaluated and recommended proposals for funding, and administered projects and initiatives. She also assisted in public policy analysis and related policy program development, and she provided leadership to the foundation’s school-based health care policy program. Previously, Dr. Wright was the maternal and child health director and the bureau chief for child and family services at the Michigan Department of Community Health in Lansing, Michigan. In that role, she managed policy, programs, and resources with the goal of reducing preventable maternal, infant, and child morbidity and mortality through policy and programming. She received her bachelor’s degree in community and school health as well as her New York State certification in secondary school education from the City University of New York. Dr. Wright obtained her master of public health degree in health policy and administration and her doctor of philosophy in public health from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Dr. Wright takes an active leadership role in several professional associations and community organizations, including APHA and the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18979.
×
Page 112
Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $48.00 Buy Ebook | $38.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Research based on decades of experience in the developing world has identified educational status, especially the status of the mother, as a major predictor of health outcomes and that the literature indicates that the gradient in health outcomes by educational attainment has steepened over the last four decades across the United States. Since the 1990s, while the average life expectancy in the United States has been steadily increasing, life expectancy has actually decreased for people without a high school education, especially white women.

To understand the complex relationship between education and health and how this understanding could inform our nation's investments and policies, the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a public workshop in Washington, DC, on June 5, 2014. This workshop, which featured presentations and extensive discussion periods, also explored how the health and education sectors can work together more effectively to achieve improvements in both health status and educational achievement. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!