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Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies, Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery (2015)

Chapter: Appendix F: Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 510 Checklists

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 510 Checklists." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies, Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18996.
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F

Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 5–10 Checklists

Across jurisdictions there is great variability in the agencies and organizations that have roles in disaster recovery, their organizational structures, and the terms used to describe them. The checklists in Chapters 510 of this report identify primary actors and key partners for a series of pre-event, short-term, and intermediate- to long-term recovery priorities. Although it is not feasible to capture all possible relevant organizations (and synonyms for those organizations), the intent of this appendix is to expand on select terms used to describe actors and partners identified in the checklists to stimulate thinking about the stakeholders that the committee believes communities should consider engaging in the specified disaster recovery priorities. In some cases, organizations may fall under more than one actor/partner category.

Child Care Organizations: This category encompasses organizations and professionals from a number of sectors that focus on addressing the needs of children, including but not limited to public and private providers of early education and child care services (including Head Start programs, home-based child care providers, and camps), child welfare authorities, social services, and family violence prevention services.

Community- and Faith-Based Organizations: This category encompasses faith-based and other nonprofit community organizations that provide community members with a range of services, including but not limited to shelter, food and nutritional assistance, financial support, transportation assistance, legal assistance, housing assistance, workforce training, youth and adult education and literacy support, child care and senior services, cultural development, and health services, including behavioral health services. Such organizations may also include charities, foundations and philanthropies, church groups, professional associations, academic organizations, neighborhood associations, youth organizations (e.g., Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts of the USA, Boys and Girls Clubs of America), and advocacy groups for at-risk populations such as those living with disabilities and the homeless.

Community Data Centers: This category refers to local or regional governmental and nongovernmental organizations (e.g., the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center) that collect and disseminate community-level data, including but not limited to population- and demographic-level data, crime rates, real estate sales, and economic and health indicators.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 510 Checklists." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies, Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18996.
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Community Development Organizations: This category encompasses governmental, nongovernmental (e.g., community development corporations), and private organizations (e.g., banks, real estate investors) that work to transform impoverished, blighted neighborhoods and improve quality of life and economic security for low- and middle-income individuals by investing in affordable housing, workforce development, and access to community services and amenities (e.g., child care centers, health clinics, grocery stores, public transit, recreational facilities, and charter schools).

Disaster Relief Organizations: This category includes those faith-based and other nongovernmental organizations involved in disaster planning, response, mitigation, and recovery. These organizations can be local (e.g., Community Organizations Active in Disasters, Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters, long-term recovery committees) or national (e.g., National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, Catholic Charities, the American Red Cross) in scope.

Education System: This category encompasses public and private providers of education, including schools, administration, and educators at the primary and secondary (K–12), as well as post-secondary (colleges and universities), levels. Also included are providers of early childhood education (e.g., preschools, Head Start programs), vocational and technical training institutions, school boards and state boards of education, accreditation authorities, and adult and childhood education and literacy support programs.

Elected Officials and Community Leaders: This category encompasses elected and public officials in local, state, and federal governments who have responsibility for providing leadership in community strategic planning and emergency management (i.e., governors, mayors, city managers and council members, emergency managers, disaster recovery coordinators). This category also encompasses unelected community leaders, including those that foster collaboration and teamwork throughout the community, such as members of neighborhood councils and leaders from business, education, or the faith community.

Health and Medical System Partners: This category encompasses a wide range of private for-profit, nonprofit, and governmental (local, state, and federal) entities involved in the delivery of health care, including but not limited to health care coalitions, hospitals, clinics, networks of outpatient providers (e.g., private primary and specialty care providers), occupational health professionals, surgical and procedure centers, long-term care facilities, home health care and hospice, emergency medical services, behavioral health services, community and large chain pharmacies, and walk-in health services. Also included are those facilitators of health care spanning financial (payers), health information and communication technology, diagnostics, and logistics (e.g., supply chain, transportation) fields, as well as nongovernmental public health partners such as academic public health professionals, local health coalitions and health advocacy groups, and public health professional organizations.

Urban and Regional Planning Agencies: This category encompasses governmental, academic, private, and nonprofit organizations providing urban and regional planning services. Regional planning agencies such as Metropolitan Planning Organizations and Regional Planning Commissions operate at the substate level.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 510 Checklists." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies, Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18996.
×
Page 455
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Key to Select Terms Used to Describe Primary Actors and Key Partners in Chapter 510 Checklists." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies, Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18996.
×
Page 456
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In the devastation that follows a major disaster, there is a need for multiple sectors to unite and devote new resources to support the rebuilding of infrastructure, the provision of health and social services, the restoration of care delivery systems, and other critical recovery needs. In some cases, billions of dollars from public, private and charitable sources are invested to help communities recover. National rhetoric often characterizes these efforts as a "return to normal." But for many American communities, pre-disaster conditions are far from optimal. Large segments of the U.S. population suffer from preventable health problems, experience inequitable access to services, and rely on overburdened health systems. A return to pre-event conditions in such cases may be short-sighted given the high costs - both economic and social - of poor health. Instead, it is important to understand that the disaster recovery process offers a series of unique and valuable opportunities to improve on the status quo. Capitalizing on these opportunities can advance the long-term health, resilience, and sustainability of communities - thereby better preparing them for future challenges.

Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters identifies and recommends recovery practices and novel programs most likely to impact overall community public health and contribute to resiliency for future incidents. This book makes the case that disaster recovery should be guided by a healthy community vision, where health considerations are integrated into all aspects of recovery planning before and after a disaster, and funding streams are leveraged in a coordinated manner and applied to health improvement priorities in order to meet human recovery needs and create healthy built and natural environments. The conceptual framework presented in Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters lays the groundwork to achieve this goal and provides operational guidance for multiple sectors involved in community planning and disaster recovery.

Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters calls for actions at multiple levels to facilitate recovery strategies that optimize community health. With a shared healthy community vision, strategic planning that prioritizes health, and coordinated implementation, disaster recovery can result in a communities that are healthier, more livable places for current and future generations to grow and thrive - communities that are better prepared for future adversities.

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