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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
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Appendix E

Open Meeting Agendas

MEETING ONE

Tuesday, February 4, 2014
National Academy of Sciences, Board Room
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC

10:30 a.m. Convene Open Session
Introductions
Richard Bonnie
Presentation of the Charge to the Committee and Discussion
Eric Lindblom
Director of the Office of Policy
Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration
11:30 a.m. State and Local Efforts in Raising the Minimum Purchase Age
Peter H. Fisher
Vice President, State Issues
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
12:30 p.m. Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
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MEETING TWO

Thursday, April 10, 2014
Keck Center, Room 100
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC

OPEN SESSION

8:30 a.m. Adolescent and Young Adult Brain Development
Jay Giedd, M.D.
Chief, Brain Imaging Section
Child Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health
9:30 a.m. Adolescent and Young Adult Cognitive and Psychosocial Development and Decision Making
Laurence Steinberg, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Psychology
Temple University
10:30 a.m. Break
10:45 a.m. Effect of Nicotine on the Developing Brain
Neal Benowitz, M.D.
Professor, Department of Medicine
University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
11:45 a.m. Emerging and Alternative Nicotine and Tobacco Products
David Abrams, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies
Legacy for Health
12:45 p.m. Lunch
Advertising, Marketing, and Messaging Strategies for Adolescents and Young Adults
1:45 p.m. Tobacco Industry Messaging Strategies
Pam Ling, M.D., M.P.H.
Associate Professor, Department of Medicine
University of California, San Francisco
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
×
2:45 p.m. The Role of Media Channels and Messages in Shaping U.S. Tobacco Use Patterns
Donna Vallone, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Senior Vice President, Research and Evaluation
Legacy for Health
3:45 p.m. Reflections: Clinical Pediatric Perspective
Jonathan Winickoff, M.D., M.P.H.
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Massachusetts General Hospital for Children
4:15 p.m. Public Comment
Closing Comments
Richard Bonnie, Committee Chair
(When no additional public comments, adjourn open session.)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
×
Page 369
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
×
Page 370
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
×
Page 371
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Open Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18997.
×
Page 372
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Tobacco use by adolescents and young adults poses serious concerns. Nearly all adults who have ever smoked daily first tried a cigarette before 26 years of age. Current cigarette use among adults is highest among persons aged 21 to 25 years. The parts of the brain most responsible for cognitive and psychosocial maturity continue to develop and change through young adulthood, and adolescent brains are uniquely vulnerable to the effects of nicotine.

At the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products considers the likely public health impact of raising the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products. The report reviews the existing literature on tobacco use patterns, developmental biology and psychology, health effects of tobacco use, and the current landscape regarding youth access laws, including minimum age laws and their enforcement. Based on this literature, the report makes conclusions about the likely effect of raising the minimum age to 19, 21, and 25 years on tobacco use initiation. The report also quantifies the accompanying public health outcomes based on findings from two tobacco use simulation models. According to the report, raising the minimum age of legal access to tobacco products, particularly to ages 21 and 25, will lead to substantial reductions in tobacco use, improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, and save lives. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products will be a valuable reference for federal policy makers and state and local health departments and legislators.

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