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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Appendix B

Committee Member Biographies

Mary Jane England, M.D. (Chair), is professor of health policy and management at the Boston University School of Public Health. Recently, she successfully completed a term as interim chair of community health sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. In 1964, Dr. England received her medical degree from Boston University and launched an international career as a child psychiatrist. As an authority on employer and employee benefits, she has brought multiple informed perspectives to bear on health care reform. She was the first commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Social Services (1979-1983), associate dean and director of the Littauer Master in Public Administration Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (1983-1987), president of the American Medical Women’s Association (1986-1987), president of the American Psychiatric Association (1995-1996), and a corporate vice president of Prudential (1987-1990) and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Washington Business Group on Health (1990-2001). A nationally known expert on health care and mental health parity, Dr. England chaired the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee that produced the 2006 Quality Chasm report on care for mental health and substance use disorders. In 2008, she chaired an IOM committee on parental depression and its effect on children and other family members. In 2011, she chaired an IOM committee on the public health dimensions of the epilepsies. Having recently completed a term on the Commission on Effective Leadership (2006-2009) of the American Council on Education and currently participating in the Advancing Care Together project in Colorado (2009-present), Dr. England

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

continues to serve on Mrs. Rosalynn Carter’s Task Force on Mental Health at the Carter Center. As president of Regis College (2001-2011), she oversaw a number of transformations, including taking the undergraduate women’s college into coeducation; building its graduate programs, notably in nursing, health administration, and other health professions; and developing curricula to serve the needs of diverse populations of 21st-century students through interdisciplinary pathways.

Susan M. Adams, Ph.D., RN, PMHNP, FAANP, is professor of nursing and faculty scholar for community engaged behavioral health at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and a licensed psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP). A respected advanced practice psychiatric nurse and educator, Dr. Adams served as program director for Vanderbilt’s PMHNP program for almost two decades, developing a modified distance option program and overseeing its sustained growth and national recognition. Her research with community partners such as The Next Door, an agency that serves women with substance abuse problems reentering the community from incarceration, informs agency development and evaluation of new service lines, including trauma-informed care, on-site psychiatric medication management, supported employment, housing options, and family reintegration. Since 1997, Dr. Adams has served on the board of the Mental Health Cooperative, a multisite network that provides a continuum of services for individuals and families with serious mental illness. During her career, she has been a leader in clinical practice, education, and innovative models of care, with recent efforts in integration of primary care and behavioral health care. She has served on national panels and initiatives for the American Nurses Association (ANA), American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF), American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA), International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses (ISPN) developing PMHNP competencies, the initial PMHNP certification exam, nurse practitioner faculty and program standards, and the PMH workforce. A frequent speaker at national conferences, Dr. Adams shares her expertise on co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, screening and brief intervention for alcohol/drug abuse, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), PMHNP education for full scope of practice, and PMHNP certification review courses. Recent publications address treatment outcomes for co-occurring disorders, predictors of treatment retention, and training for nurses regarding FASD screening and prevention, as well as book chapters in widely used nursing texts on psychotherapeutic approaches for addictions and related disorders and on evidence-based practice. As current president of the APNA (2014-2015), Dr. Adams is focusing on collaboration initiatives that facilitate integrated models of care, interprofessional education, and research.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

Patricia A. Areán, Ph.D., is a professor and director of targeted treatment development in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington and is a licensed clinical psychologist. Dr. Areán is an international expert on the effectiveness of behavioral interventions for mood disorders. She leads a research and training group that is known for developing, studying, increasing access to, and implementing user-friendly, high-quality behavioral interventions for mood as it presents in chronic illness, aging, and low-income and ethnic minority populations and in a variety of service settings—mental health, primary care, senior services, and mobile platforms. Her team combines the latest information from cognitive neuroscience, socioeconomics, and implementation science in its designs. Since 1994, Dr. Areán has published 115 peer-reviewed articles on these topics and has been funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the Hartford Foundation. She is currently funded by NIMH to study the effect of “brain games” and of mobile health apps on mood. Her work has won national recognition, resulting in an early career award from the American Psychological Association, a mid-career award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for her work on disseminating evidence-based practices, and the Award for Achievements in Diversity in Mental Health from the American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry. Dr. Areán currently leads an interdisciplinary research and implementation team consisting of researchers from diverse backgrounds, including social work, nursing, psychiatry, family and general medicine, medical sociology, and clinical psychology. She also provides training in evidence-based treatments to community mental health and health professionals, and is developing deployable and cost-effective training models based on contemporary adult learning methods.

John S. Brekke, Ph.D., is Frances G. Larson professor of social work research at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Social Work. He completed his Ph.D. in social welfare at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the supervision of Dr. Mary Ann Test. He began his research career with the Program of Assertive Community Treatment project in Madison. He began as faculty at USC in 1984, and has taught research and clinical courses in the master of social work program and Ph.D. courses on treatment outcome research and research grant writing. Prior to assuming an academic appointment, Dr. Brekke held a number of clinical positions working with persons diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness in inpatient and outpatient settings. Since 1989, he has been the principal investigator on numerous grants funded by NIMH—one from SAMHSA, one funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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(PCORI), and two sponsored by the UniHealth Foundation. In 2010 he was awarded a 3-year Investigator Award in Health Policy Research from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. His work, focused on the improvement of community-based services for individuals diagnosed with severe mental illness, has integrated biological aspects of mental disorder into psychosocial rehabilitation for individuals with schizophrenia. Dr. Brekke has tested biosocial models for understanding rehabilitative outcomes in schizophrenia and has studied how to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based practices in community-based services for individuals with schizophrenia. He also serves as principal investigator on a project that has developed and manualized and is testing the effectiveness of a community-based peer health navigator intervention linking mental health and health services for the seriously mentally ill in behavioral health care settings.

Michelle G. Craske, Ph.D., is professor of psychology, psychiatry, and biobehavioral sciences and director of the Anxiety Disorders Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She has published extensively in the area of fear and anxiety disorders. In addition to many research articles, she has written academic books on the topics of the etiology and treatment of anxiety disorders, gender differences in anxiety, translation from the basic science of fear learning to the understanding and treating of phobias, and principles and practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy, as well as several self-help books and therapist guides. In addition, she has been the recipient of NIMH funding since 1993 for research projects pertaining to risk factors for anxiety disorders and depression among children and adolescents, the cognitive and physiological aspects of anxiety and panic attacks, neural mediators of behavioral treatments for anxiety disorders, fear extinction mechanisms of exposure therapy, implementation of treatments for anxiety and related disorders, and constructs of positive and negative valence underlying anxiety and depression. She was associate editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, and is presently associate editor for Behaviour Research and Therapy and Psychological Bulletin, as well as a scientific board member for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Dr. Craske was a member of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Anxiety Disorders Work Group and the DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group (chair, Anxiety Disorders Subworkgroup). She is also a member of the American Psychological Association’s Clinical Treatment Guidelines Advisory Steering Committee. Dr. Craske has given invited keynote addresses at many international conferences and frequently is invited to present training workshops on the most recent advances in cognitive-behavioral treatment for anxiety disorders. She is currently a professor in the Department of Psychology and Depart-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

ment of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, and director of the UCLA Anxiety Disorders Research Center. Dr. Craske received her B.A. Hons. from the University of Tasmania and her Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia.

Kermit Anthony Crawford, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a designated forensic psychologist. He is director of the Center for Multicultural Mental Health (CMMH) and associate professor in the Division of Psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Crawford has expertise in mental health, psychology training, substance abuse, and workforce development and extensive experience in disaster behavioral health response and mental health training. He is principal investigator for several state and federal research and training grants. He has several publications in refereed journals and was recently lead author of a book chapter on the culturally competent practice of disaster behavioral health services. In addition to his earned doctorate from Boston College, Dr. Crawford is the recipient of an honorary doctoral degree of humane letters from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. He has facilitated and provided disaster behavioral health response training across the nation on behalf of SAMHSA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). He provided consultation and training to disaster behavioral health responders in Mississippi and provided consultation and evaluation services in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina. He directed a team of behavioral health clinicians providing services to the evacuees from New Orleans, for which he was interviewed by the American Psychological Association’s monthly publication The Monitor on Psychology. In his career, Dr. Crawford is committed to spanning cultures and to providing quality equitable mental health and behavioral health services to diverse underserved populations. He is also a psychologist with the New England Patriots.

Frank Verloin deGruy III, M.D., MSFM, is Woodward-Chisholm professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado. He has held academic appointments at the Departments of Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, Duke University, and the University of South Alabama College of Medicine. A member of the IOM, he is past president of the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association and past president of the North American Primary Care Research Network. He currently serves on several national boards, including those of the National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC), the Council of Academic Family Medicine Organizations, the National Integration Academy Council (chair), and the Family Physicians’ Inquiries Network (chair). His local activities involve board service for the 2040 Partners for Health organization and the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Colorado Institute of Family Medicine, as well as active service on a number of committees for the University of Colorado and the Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. deGruy has authored more than 150 papers, chapters, books, and editorials, and has reviewed more than 1,000 grant applications for NIMH, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is currently on the editorial boards of Families, Systems and Health, the Annals of Family Medicine, and the Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

Jonathan Delman, Ph.D., J.D., M.P.H., is an assistant research professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center (SPARC). At SPARC, he is director of the Program for Recovery Research and associate director for participatory action research at the Transitions (to adulthood) Research and Training Center. He is also a senior researcher at the Technical Assistance Collaborative, a national housing and human services consulting firm. Dr. Delman is considered a national expert in recovery-oriented care and measurement, peer support services, community-based participatory action research (CBPR), and activating consumer participation in treatment decisions and policy development. He has regularly advised SAMHSA, NIMH, state agencies, peer organizations, and managed care companies on these matters. Additionally, he serves on several national health-related measurement and quality improvement committees. Dr. Delman is a mental health consumer researcher and a 2008 recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Community Health Leader award, 1 of 10 awarded nationally, for “individuals who overcome daunting obstacles to improve health and health care in their communities.” He was recognized for generating the development of a young adult voice in mental health research and policy, resulting in an altered service system landscape that now recognizes the unique service and support needs of young adults with behavioral health conditions.

Constance M. Horgan, Sc.D., is a professor at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University and is the founding director of its Institute for Behavioral Health. From 2007 to 2013, she served as associate dean for research. Dr. Horgan’s expertise is in health policy analysis and services research. Specifically, her research is focused on how alcohol, drug, and mental health services are financed, organized, and delivered in the public and private sectors and what approaches can be used to improve the quality and effectiveness of the delivery system. Dr. Horgan has led studies for a range of federal agencies (AHRQ, NIMH, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism [NIAAA], the National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA], SAMHSA); state government; and foundations,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She directed the Brandeis/Harvard Center to Improve the Quality of Drug Abuse Treatment, funded by NIDA, which is focused on how performance measurement and management and payment techniques can be harnessed more effectively and efficiently to deliver higher-quality substance abuse treatment. For the past 15 years, Dr. Horgan has led a series of NIH-funded nationally representative surveys of the provision of behavioral health care in private health plans, including the use of incentives, performance measures, and other approaches to quality improvement, and how behavioral health parity legislation is affecting those services. She is a co-investigator on studies funded by NIDA, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on the design, implementation, and evaluation of provider and patient incentive payments to improve care delivery. For more than 20 years, Dr. Horgan has directed the NIAAA training program to support doctoral students in health services research, teaching core courses in the substance use and treatment areas and directing the weekly doctoral seminar. Currently, she is a member of the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s (NCQA’s) Behavioral Health Care Measurement Advisory Panel and also serves on the National Quality Forum’s (NQF’s) Behavioral Health Standing Committee. Dr. Horgan received her doctorate in health policy and management from Johns Hopkins University and her master’s degree in demography from Georgetown University.

Haiden A. Huskamp, Ph.D., is a professor of health care policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. She is a health economist with extensive experience studying utilization, spending, and quality of mental health and substance use disorder treatment through quantitative analysis of large administrative databases and qualitative analysis involving structured key informant interviews. Through grants from NIH and several private foundations, Dr. Huskamp is currently examining the effects of new payment and delivery models on mental health and substance use disorder treatment; the impact of federal mental health parity legislation; the design, implementation, and impacts of recent efforts to extend health insurance coverage to individuals involved in the criminal justice system; and factors influencing physician adoption of new antipsychotic medications. She co-directs a Harvard Medical School health policy course that is required of all first-year medical students. Dr. Huskamp previously served on the IOM committees on pediatric palliative care and on accelerating rare disease research and the development of orphan products.

Harold Alan Pincus, M.D., is professor and vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, director of quality and outcomes research at New York-Presbyterian

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

Hospital, and co-director of Columbia’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. Dr. Pincus is also a senior scientist at the RAND Corporation. Previously, he was director of the RAND-University of Pittsburgh Health Institute and executive vice chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. He is national director of the Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program (funded by Atlantic Philanthropies and the John A. Hartford Foundation), and directed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program on Depression in Primary Care and the John A. Hartford Foundation’s national program on Building Interdisciplinary Geriatric Research Centers. Dr. Pincus was also deputy medical director of the American Psychiatric Association and founding director of its Office of Research. He served as special assistant to the director of NIMH and, as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation clinical scholar, on the White House and congressional staffs. Among other recent projects, he led the national evaluation of mental health services for veterans, the redesign of primary care/behavioral health relationships in New Orleans, an NIH-funded national study of research mentoring, and evaluations of major federal and state programs to integrate health and mental health/substance abuse care. Dr. Pincus chairs the World Health Organization/International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 Technical Advisory Group on Quality and Patient Safety, the NQF Behavioral Health Standing Committee, and the Medicaid Task Force for the Measurement Applications Partnership under the Affordable Care Act.

Enola K. Proctor, Ph.D., is Shanti K. Khinduka distinguished professor at the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. She is founding director of the Center for Mental Health Services Research at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. Since 1993, the Center has collaborated with its national network of research partners to build a base of evidence designed to address the challenges of delivering mental health services to vulnerable populations. Dr. Proctor’s work to improve depression care to older adults has been supported by grants from NIMH, NIA, and private foundations. She is a national leader in the scientific study of the movement of evidence-based practices from clinical knowledge to practical applications. Dr. Proctor directs the Center for Dissemination and Implementation at Washington University’s Institute for Public Health, along with research cores for dissemination and implementation research, including that for Washington University’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. Her teaching focuses on service system and implementation science methods for social work, health, and mental health care settings. A generous and committed teacher to doctoral and master’s students, she has led Washington University’s NIMH-funded doctoral and postdoctoral training program in mental

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

health services research for 20 years. She also leads the NIMH-funded Implementation Research Institute, a national training program for implementation science for mental health services. Her peer-reviewed publications address the quality of mental health services and the implementation of evidence-based interventions. Among her books are Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health: Translating Science to Practice, published in 2012 by Oxford University Press, and Developing Practice Guidelines for Social Work Interventions: Issues, Methods, and Research Agenda, published in 2003 by Columbia University Press. Dr. Proctor was a member of NIMH’s National Advisory Council from 2007 to 2011 and served on two National Advisory Committee workgroups—on research workforce development and intervention research. She served as editor-in-chief of the research journal of the National Association of Social Workers, Social Work Research. Her awards include the Knee Wittman Award for Lifetime Achievement in Health and Mental Health Practice, National Association of Social Workers Foundation; the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society for Social Work and Research; the President’s Award for Excellence in Social Work Research, National Association of Social Workers; and Mental Health Professional of the Year, Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Metropolitan St. Louis. Along with university mentoring awards, she received Washington University’s top honor, the Arthur Holly Compton Faculty Achievement Award. She also was elected as a founding member of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare.

Rhonda Robinson-Beale, M.D., is senior vice president and chief medical officer at Blue Cross of Idaho. She was most recently chief medical officer for OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, a leading provider of solutions for mental health and substance use disorders in California. Dr. Robinson-Beale developed quality initiatives and clinical systems for OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions. She has more than 20 years of experience in behavioral health and quality management and is an active member of the behavioral health community. She has been involved with NCQA as a surveyor; a member of the Review Oversite Committee, which makes accreditation decisions; and a member of advisory panels that developed the managed behavioral health care organization and disease management standards. She has also been a member of the board of directors for the IOM’s Neuroscience and Behavioral Health and Health Care Services Boards and has served on several IOM committees. Dr. Robinson-Beale participated on NQF’s board of directors as co-chair for the Evidence-Based Practices to Treat Substance Use Disorders Steering Committee. Before joining OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, she was chief medical officer for PacifiCare Behavioral Health. She also served as senior vice president and chief medical officer for CIGNA Behavioral Health, national medical director for Blue Cross Blue

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Shield, executive medical director of medical and care management clinical programs for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, and senior medical director for behavioral medicine for Health Alliance Plan. Dr. Robinson-Beale received her medical degree from Wayne State University and her psychiatric training at Detroit Psychiatric Institute. She is certified in psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

Sarah Hudson Scholle, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., is a health services researcher and has responsibility for overseeing the development and implementation of NCQA’s research agenda. Her research interests focus on assessing the quality of health care and understanding consumer perceptions and preferences in health care, particularly for women and families. Dr. Scholle leads efforts to develop new approaches to quality measurement and evaluation of health care, including comprehensive well care for children and women, care coordination for vulnerable populations, and patient experiences with the medical home. Her prior work supported the development of NCQA’s recognition program for patient-centered medical homes and distinction programs for multicultural health care populations, as well as numerous quality measures. Prior to joining NCQA, Dr. Scholle served as associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She has numerous publications in major health services and women’s health journals. She chairs a Health Services Research Merit Review Board for the Veterans Health Administration Health Services Research and Development Program. She also reviews manuscripts for a variety of journals (including Health Services Research and Women’s Health Issues). She has served on expert panels for the IOM and NQF. Dr. Scholle received her bachelor’s degree in history and master’s degree in public health from Yale University and her doctorate in public health from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

John T. Walkup, M.D., is professor of psychiatry, DeWitt Wallace senior scholar, vice chair of psychiatry, and director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Prior to joining the faculty at Weill Cornell, Dr. Walkup spent 20 years at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine serving as professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and deputy director in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He held a joint appointment in the Center for American Indian Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he was director of behavioral research. Dr. Walkup has three main academic areas of interest: his work with Tourette’s syndrome uniquely spans psychiatry, child psychiatry, and neurology; his expertise in interventions research focuses on the development and evaluation of psychopharmacological and psychosocial treatments for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
×

the major psychiatric disorders of childhood, including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, Tourette’s syndrome, and suicidal behavior; and lastly, he has been involved in developing and evaluating interventions to reduce the large mental health disparities facing Native American youth, specifically with respect to drug use and suicide prevention. Dr. Walkup was awarded the Norbert and Charlotte Rieger Award for Academic Achievement in 2009 from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Blanche F. Ittleson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry in 2011 from the American Psychiatric Association. His team at the Center for American Indian Health at Johns Hopkins won the Bronze Achievement Award from the Institute of Psychiatric Services of the American Psychiatric Association in 2012 for a pioneering suicide prevention project on the White Mountain Apache Reservation. Dr. Walkup serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Trichotillomania Learning Center, the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, and the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention. He is also deputy editor for psychopharmacology for the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. His research has been published in major medical journals, including the Journal of the American Medical Association and the New England Journal of Medicine.

Myrna Weissman, Ph.D., is Diane Goldman Kemper family professor of epidemiology in psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons and Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, and chief of the Division of Epidemiology at New York State Psychiatric Institute. She is a member of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology at Columbia. Until 1987, she was a professor of psychiatry and epidemiology at Yale University School of Medicine and director of the Depression Research Unit. She has been a visiting senior scholar at the IOM. Dr. Weissman’s research focuses on understanding the rates and risks of mood and anxiety disorders using methods of epidemiology, genetics, and neuroimaging and the application of these findings to develop and test empirically based treatments and preventive interventions. Her current interest is in bringing psychiatric epidemiology closer to translational studies in the neurosciences and genetics. She directs a three-generation study of families at high and low risk for depression who have been studied clinically for more than 25 years and who are participating in genetic and imaging studies. She directs a multicenter study to determine the impact of maternal remission from depression on offspring. She also is one of the principal investigators for a multicenter study to find biomarkers of response to the treatment of depression. Dr. Weissman was one of the developers of interpersonal psychotherapy, an evidence-based treatment for depression. She is a member of the IOM. In April 2009, she was selected by the American College of Epidemiology as 1 of 10 epidemiologists in the United States who has had a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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major impact on public policy and public health. The summary of her work on depression appears in a special issue of the Annals of Epidemiology, Triumphs in Epidemiology. Dr. Weissman received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University School of Medicine in 1974.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders: A Framework for Establishing Evidence-Based Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19013.
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Mental health and substance use disorders affect approximately 20 percent of Americans and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although a wide range of evidence-based psychosocial interventions are currently in use, most consumers of mental health care find it difficult to know whether they are receiving high-quality care. Although the current evidence base for the effects of psychosocial interventions is sizable, subsequent steps in the process of bringing a psychosocial intervention into routine clinical care are less well defined. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders details the reasons for the gap between what is known to be effective and current practice and offers recommendations for how best to address this gap by applying a framework that can be used to establish standards for psychosocial interventions.

The framework described in Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders can be used to chart a path toward the ultimate goal of improving the outcomes. The framework highlights the need to (1) support research to strengthen the evidence base on the efficacy and effectiveness of psychosocial interventions; (2) based on this evidence, identify the key elements that drive an intervention's effect; (3) conduct systematic reviews to inform clinical guidelines that incorporate these key elements; (4) using the findings of these systematic reviews, develop quality measures - measures of the structure, process, and outcomes of interventions; and (5) establish methods for successfully implementing and sustaining these interventions in regular practice including the training of providers of these interventions.

The recommendations offered in this report are intended to assist policy makers, health care organizations, and payers that are organizing and overseeing the provision of care for mental health and substance use disorders while navigating a new health care landscape. The recommendations also target providers, professional societies, funding agencies, consumers, and researchers, all of whom have a stake in ensuring that evidence-based, high-quality care is provided to individuals receiving mental health and substance use services.

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