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Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant (2015)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
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C

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

ROBERT A. BEAUDET, Co-Chair, is an emeritus professor of chemistry. In 2005 he retired from the faculty of the University of Southern California, where he had served continuously in the Department of Chemistry since 1962. He has also been a part-time employee at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory since 1983. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Harvard University in 1962. From 1961 to 1962, he was a U.S. Army Chemical Corps officer and served most of his tour of duty at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a research scientist. Dr. Beaudet since has served on Department of Defense committees addressing both offensive and defensive considerations surrounding chemical warfare agents. He was chair of an Army science board committee that addressed chemical detection and trace gas analysis. He was also the chair of an Air Force technical conference on chemical warfare decontamination and protection. He has participated in two NRC studies on chemical and biological sensor technologies and energetic materials and technologies. Most of his academic career has been devoted to research in molecular structure and molecular spectroscopy. Previously, Dr. Beaudet served as a member of the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST), as a member of the NRC Committee on Review of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Disposal Program, and as a BAST liaison to the Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (Stockpile Committee). Since 1996, he has chaired or served as a member on various NRC committees reviewing the design evolution of the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives program for the pilot plant facilities in Colorado and Kentucky.

TODD A. KIMMELL, Co-Chair, is principal investigator with the Environmental Science Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory. He is an environmental scientist and policy analyst, with more than 30 years’ experience in solid and hazardous waste management, permitting and regulatory compliance, cleanup programs, environmental programs policy development, and emergency management and homeland security. He has supported the Army’s chemical and conventional munitions management programs, and has contributed to the Army’s Assembled Chemical Weapons Assessment Program and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Mr. Kimmell also has a strong technical background in analytical and physical/chemical test method development and analytical quality assurance and control. Mr. Kimmell has also supported a number of environmental permitting programs at Army chemical weapons storage sites and at open burning/open detonation sites. He graduated from George Washington University with an M.S. in environmental science.

EDWARD BOUWER is currently the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering and chair of the department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. He is also director of the Center for Contaminant Transport, Fate and Remediation. Before that, Dr. Bouwer spent 7 years as director of the Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments, a project that was funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Bouwer’s research interests encompass factors that influence biotransformation of contaminants; bioremediation for control of contaminated soils and groundwaters; bio-film kinetics; biological processes design in wastewater, industrial, and drinking water treatment; transport and fate of microorganisms in porous media; and the behavior of metal and organic contaminants in sediments and aquatic ecosystems. Dr. Bouwer received a B.S.C.E. in civil engineering with a minor in nuclear engineering from Arizona State University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University.

JUDITH A. BRADBURY graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a Ph.D. in public and international affairs and has an M.A. in public affairs from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a B.S. in sociology from the London

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
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School of Economics. She retired after almost 20 years as a senior social scientist with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. In her work, she has emphasized the relevance of social science insights and tools to the analysis and resolution of science policy issues. She has extensive experience in both the practice and research of public involvement and institutional activities. Her experience includes (most recently) responsibility for planning and implementing outreach and education activities for the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration partnership. Previous work includes evaluation of selected U.S. Army restoration advisory boards; a series of evaluations of the effectiveness of DOE’s site-specific advisory boards; evaluation of training programs in public participation for DOE managers; meeting facilitation, planning, and program evaluation for the DOE nuclear waste transportation program; and research into community perspectives of the risk of incineration for disposing of the nation’s stockpile of chemical weapons.

REBECCA A. HAFFENDEN, ESQ., is an attorney and currently serves as a program attorney at the Argonne National Laboratory. Her recent professional work has included work for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to evaluate legislation and regulations associated with security vulnerabilities and providing legal expertise to programs involving federal facility site remediation and hazardous waste compliance and corrective actions (RCRA). She also coauthored a working paper on the application of federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs to waste chemical agents, in addition to being a coauthor of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternates program. Ms. Haffenden received a B.A. in psychology from the University of Illinois and a J.D. degree from Suffolk Law School in Boston.

HANK C. JENKINS-SMITH is a professor of political science and associate director for the Center for Applied Social Research at the University of Oklahoma. Previously, he was a professor of public policy at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Before that, he served as an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of New Mexico (UNM) and director of the UNM Institute for Public Policy. His areas of expertise include statistical analysis, public opinion measurement, politics of risk perception, environmental policy, and public policy. Dr. Jenkins-Smith is a member of the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) and the American Political Science Association. In 1996, he received the SRA’s Risk Research Award. He has over 60 publications and reports in his areas of expertise. Dr. Jenkins-Smith received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Rochester.

KIMBERLY L. JONES is a professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at Howard University. Before that, from 1996 to 2009, she worked as an associate and assistant professor in the department. Over the past 5 years, her research objectives have primarily been interdisciplinary, collaborative research in the emerging research areas of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology, while continuing to build her environmental engineering capabilities. She has worked to develop an effective research strategy to investigate innovative technologies involving nanotechnology, environmental engineering, and membrane processes in an effort to solve some of the more pervasive problems facing our world, while working to attract, retain, and graduate technically competent African-American students to increase the number of minority engineers and scientists in academic, industrial, and government-related careers. Dr. Jones received her B.S. in civil engineering from Howard University, an M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.

MURRAY GLENN LORD is associate environmental health and safety (EH&S) director in the EH&S Operations Technology Center at Dow Chemical Company. He is responsible for research programs for technology development for global environmental operations, which includes project areas in process optimization, technology development, and capital project execution. Mr. Lord has experience in project areas across multiple business and technology areas. He is also accountable for EH&S performance, budget performance, project development, and personnel leadership of research groups at four locations and is the leader of the Environmental Technology Leadership Group, accountable for environmental technology development for Dow. Previously, Mr. Lord was a technical leader of propylene oxide process research and was responsible for a research program in support of technology development for the propylene oxide process. He was also responsible for development and coordination of research studies at laboratory, pilot plant, and full commercial scale.

TRISHA H. MILLER is a systems analyst/engineer with Sandia National Laboratories. She has participated in a number of analysis projects focused on chemical security, including projects supporting the Department of Homeland Security related to evaluation of the security benefits of inherently safer technologies in the chemical industry and risk assessments for chemical attacks. Dr. Miller was awarded an early-career grant to develop new methodologies for end-to-end analysis of chemical defense systems. She received her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 2009. She serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Chemistry at Augsburg College in Minneapolis.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
×

ROBERT B. PUYEAR is an independent consultant specializing in corrosion prevention and control, failure analysis, and materials selection. Mr. Puyear worked at the Haynes Stellite Division of Union Carbide for 16 years developing high-performance materials for chemical and aerospace applications. He also worked for Monsanto for 21 years as a corrosion specialist, where he managed the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Section. He is an expert in materials engineering and evaluating materials of construction. Mr. Puyear graduated from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy with a B.S. in chemical engineering and from Purdue University with an M.S. in industrial administration. He was also a member on the National Research Council Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program.

WILLIAM R. RHYNE is a retired risk and safety analysis consultant to the nuclear, chemical, and transportation industries. He has over 30 years’ experience associated with nuclear and chemical processing facilities and with the transportation of hazardous materials. From 1984 to 1987, he was the project manager and principal investigator for a probabilistic analysis of transporting obsolete chemical munitions. Beginning in1997, he has been a member of several NRC committees for the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives program and is a former member of the Committee on Chemical Demilitarization (2007-2010). Dr. Rhyne has authored or coauthored numerous publications and reports on nuclear and chemical safety and risk analysis areas and is the author of the book Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk Analysis: Quantitative Approaches for Truck and Train. He is a former member of the NRC Transportation Research Board’s Hazardous Materials Committee, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Nuclear Society, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He received a B.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of Tennessee and M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Virginia.

PHILLIP E. SAVAGE is the head of the Chemical Engineering Department at Penn State. He earned a B.S. from Penn State and M.Ch.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Delaware. All of his degrees are in chemical engineering. His research and teaching focus on the rates, the mechanisms, and the engineering of chemical reactions that move us toward a more environmentally sustainable society. Current research projects deal with hydrothermal reactions that can be used for hydrogen production from biomass and for liquid transportation fuel production from algae. His research group uses experiments, modeling, and simulation to explore different reaction systems. His teaching focuses on chemical reaction engineering and environmental sustainability. Dr. Savage is editor-in-chief for Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, and he is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Supercritical Fluids, Energy & Fuels, and Environmental Progress & Sustainable Energy. He has served as chair of the Catalysis & Reaction Engineering division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and the Industrial & Engineering Chemistry division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Dr. Savage is a fellow of the AIChE and the ACS. He received the 2009 Michigan Governor’s Award for Green Chemistry and the 2001 National Catalyst Award from the American Chemistry Council in recognition of his outstanding teaching and contributions to chemical education.

PHILIP C. SINGER is an emeritus professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering in the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, where he was the Dan Okun Distinguished Professor of Environmental Engineering from 2002 to 2010. After obtaining his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1969, Dr. Singer was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Notre Dame before joining the faculty at UNC in 1973. He conducted research on the chemical aspects of water and wastewater treatment and on aquatic chemistry for 45 years and has published more than 250 papers and reports on these subjects. Dr. Singer has been active in the American Water Works Association and has served on the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board and its Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants, as well as on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board and the National Drinking Water Advisory Council. He is a recipient of the American Water Works Association’s A.P. Black Research Award and the Abel Wolman Award of Excellence, the American Academy of Environmental Engineers’ Gordon Maskew Fair Award, the National Water Research Institute’s Athalie Richardson Irvine Clarke Prize, and the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professor’s Charles R. O’Melia Distinguished Educator Award. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in 2005. Dr. Singer is currently a part-time consultant with CDM-Smith.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19050.
×
Page 69
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One of the last two sites with chemical munitions and chemical materiel is the Pueblo Chemical Depot in Pueblo, Colorado. The stockpile at this location consists of about 800,000 projectiles and mortars, all of which are filled with the chemical agent mustard. Under the direction of the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternative Program (ACWA), the Army has constructed the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) to destroy these munitions. The primary technology to be used to destroy the mustard agent at PCAPP is hydrolysis, resulting in a secondary waste stream referred to as hydrolysate.

PCAPP features a process that will be used to treat the hydrolysate and the thiodiglycol - a breakdown product of mustard - contained within. The process is a biotreatment technology that uses what are known as immobilized cell bioreactors. After biodegradation, the effluent flows to a brine reduction system, producing a solidified filter cake that is intended to be sent offsite to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility. Water recovered from the brine reduction system is intended to be recycled back through the plant, thereby reducing the amount of water that is withdrawn from groundwater. Although biotreatment of toxic chemicals, brine reduction, and water recovery are established technologies, never before have these technologies been combined to treat mustard hydrolysate.

At the request of the U.S. Army, Review Criteria for Successful Treatment of Hydrolysate at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant reviews the criteria for successfully treating the hydrolysate. This report provides information on the composition of the hydrolysate and describes the PCAPP processes for treating it; discusses stakeholder concerns; reviews regulatory considerations at the federal, state, and local levels; discusses Department of Transportation regulations and identifies risks associated with the offsite shipment of hydrolysate; establishes criteria for successfully treating the hydrolysate and identifies systemization data that should factor into the criteria and decision process for offsite transport and disposal of the hydrolysate; and discusses failure risks and contingency options as well as the downstream impacts of a decision to ship hydrolysate offsite.

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