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Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop (1984)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
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Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 74

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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Panel Members MELVIN G. BLASE, Professor of Agricultural Economics, University of Missouri, Columbia, received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1960 and served on the faculties of that institution and the Air Force Institute of Technology before joining the University of Missouri. While he has undertaken research in international agri- cultural development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, his do- mestic research centers on new crops for U.S. agriculture and alternative energy sources. Dr. Blase has written one book, edited two others, and written numerous articles. T. AUSTIN CAMPBELL is a Research Agronomist with the U.S. De- partment of Agriculture and is currently specializing in new-crop breeding. He received his B.S. in conservation and resource devel- opment from the University of Maryland in 1967 and spent six years with the alfalfa project of the USDA as a technician and research assistant. He received an M.S. in plant breeding from the University of Maryland in 1972 and joined the Weed Science Laboratory as a support scientist in 1973. Two years later he assumed his present position conducting research on numerous potential new-crop spe- cies, including kenaf, Crambe, Lesquerella, Limnanthes, Asclepias syriaca, Rhus glabra, Cuphea, and Stokes aster, as well as amaranth. He received his Ph.D. in plant breeding from the University of Maryland in 1980. LAURIE B. FEINE, an amaranth taxonomy and germplasm consultant, earned her B.A. from the University of Colorado in environmental, population, and organismic biology in 1976. She worked for the Rodale Research Center, specializing in amaranth germplasm and taxonomy, and began plant-breeding and selection work for improved grain varieties. She continued her work on amaranth taxonomy at Harvard Herbaria and has also collected amaranth germplasm in Mexico and Peru for the Rodale Research Center and IBPGR. HECTOR E. FLORES-MERINO, Research Assistant at the Department of Biology, Yale University, received a B.S. in biology in 1974 from 68

APPENDIX D 69 the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru. After teaching for two years, he did research at the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center in Mayagiiez and earned an M.S. in horticulture from the College of Agriculture at Mayagiiez in 1978. He was a research assistant at Rutgers University, Department of Horticulture, and is currently completing his doctoral studies at Yale. His research has involved propagation of ornamental and crop plants through tissue and cell culture and development of inoculants for nitrogen- fixing bacteria. He is currently studying the physiology and bio- chemistry of polyamines in higher plants and metabolic responses of plant cells to various types of environmental stress. LINDA c. GILBERT, Coordinating Supervisor of Product Development in the Test Kitchen at Rodale Press, Inc., received a B.Ag.Sci. degree from the University of Arizona in 1978. Since that time, she has worked in the Rodale Test Kitchens developing healthful recipes for magazines and books. Her research has centered primarily around uses for, and varietal selections of, vegetable protein food sources, including grain and vegetable amaranths, vegetable soybeans, sprout- ing soybeans, okra seed, and cold-tolerant leafy green vegetables. GERALD j. H. GRUBBEN is head of the Department of Crop Research at the Research Station for Arable Farming and Field Production of Vegetables in Lelystad, Netherlands. He served as a FAO expert in horticultural projects in Ivory Coast and Benin from 1965 to 1973. In 1975 he received his Ph.D. (agriculture) on a thesis "The Cultivation of Amaranth as a Tropical Leaf Vegetable." From 1975 to 1981 he was attached to the Department of Agricultural Research, Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam. He conducted a survey on genetic resources of vegetables for the International Board of Genetic Resources. He was involved in consultancy missions on vegetable growing, crop research, germplasm, and seed production to tropical countries. RICHARD R. HARWOOD, Director of the Rodale Research Center in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, received a B.S. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in horticulture and plant breeding from Michigan State University in 1967. He worked as a staff member of the Rockefeller Foundation in India and Thailand from 1967 to 1971 and then as head of the Cropping Systems Program at the International Rice Research Institute until 1976. Dr. Harwood has had numerous Third World agricultural development consulting assignments. He partic- ipated as a cropping system specialist in the 1976 vegetable cropping systems delegation of the Committee on Scholarly Exchange with the People's Republic of China. His current work is focused on organic farming systems and new crop development for a sustainable agriculture.

70 AMARANTH SUBODH JAIN, Professor of Agronomy at the University of California, Davis, received a B.S. from Delhi University in 1954 and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis, in 1960. He has worked extensively on the population biology of inbreeding crop species from which he has recently developed interests in the evaluation and conservation of genetic resources and in the domestication of new crops. He has traveled widely for both germplasm collections and teaching/consulting assignments and has had Guggenheim and Fulbright awards for work in Australia and India, respectively. CHARLES s. KAUFFMAN, Coordinator of New Crops Research at the Rodale Research Center in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, received his B.S. in horitculture from the Pennsylvania State University in 1971 and an M.S. in horticulture and plant breeding from North Carolina State University in 1974. He worked in an agricultural development project for unconventional crops in the southeastern United States for Thomas J. Lipton, Inc. Since 1978, the majority of his time has been spent doing research and writing on grain amaranth, especially as related to germplasm cataloging, varietal development, and the improvement of cultural techniques. T. N. KHOSHOO is Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Environment. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. (botany) from Panjab University, Lahore, and his Ph.D. (cytogenetics of conifers) from Chandigarh. He has served as Director of the National Botanical Research Institute and Deputy Director of the National Botanic Gardens in Lucknow. He worked on the experimental evolution and improvement of nonagricultural economic plants, particularly or- namental and subsidiary food plants (amaranths). He also worked out the genetic-evolutionary race histories and evolved several new cultivars that have sold in nursery trade. He is now concerned with the policy, planning, and management of the environment in India, including wildlife. JUDITH M. LYMAN, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, received her Ph.D. in plant breeding in 1980, her M.S. in floriculture and horticulture in 1976, and her B.A. in botany at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. After two years of field work at the Centro International de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Cali, Colombia, as Visiting Research Associate and Assistant to the Director of Research, she is currently Visiting Research Fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation, where she is involved in international agricultural program activities and project germplasm resources from biological and economic perspectives. CYRUS M. MCKELL is Vice-President, Research, Native Plants, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Utah in biological science and botany. In 1956 he

APPENDIX D 71 earned a Ph.D. in plant ecology, with minors in soils and rangeland management from Oregon State University. From 1956 to 1961 he served as a range plant physiologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service at Davis, California. In 1961 he became Vice- Chairman and later Chairman of the Agronomy Department, Uni- versity of California, Riverside, and conducted research on arid land management problems. Subsequently, he joined the Range Science Department at Utah State University as department head, and later as Director of the Institute for Land Reclamation, a post he held until 1980. He has held numerous consultancies on arid land man- agement worldwide and was a Fulbright scholar to Spain in 1968. GARY PAUL NABHAN is the President of Native Seeds/SEARCH in Tucson, Arizona. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in 1983 and is a principal investigator conducting research on native agricultural ecosystems through the Office of Arid Lands Studies, University of Arizona. While receiving his M.S. in plant sciences at the same university, he assembled important germplasm collections of tepary beans, sunflowers, devil's claw, and other desert-adapted crops. He has also collected amaranths from the Sierra Madre and the Valley Mexico, as well as from U.S. Indian reservations. He has published more than twenty articles and one book (The Desert Smells Like Rain) on desert foods, ethnobotany, and seed conservation. Dr. Nabhan is on the founding board of directors of the Society of Ethnobiology and its journal and is honorary Vice-President of the Seed Saver's Exchange. DONALD L. PLUCKNETT, with the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, the World Bank, received B.S. and M.S. degrees in agriculture and agronomy from the University of Nebraska in 1953 and 1957, respectively, and a Ph.D. in tropical soil science from the University of Hawaii in 1961. He has worked extensively in tropical crop and pasture research and has had broad international experience in tropical agriculture. He has been a consultant for many international groups, including working for the Ford Foun- dation on the Aswan Project in Egypt, for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, United States Agency for International De- velopment (USAID), and the South Pacific Commission. From 1973 to 1976 he was Chief of the Soil and Water Management Division, Office of Agriculture, Technical Assistance Bureau, Agency for International Development, Washington, D.C. In 1976 he was awarded AID's Superior Honor Award for his activities in International Development. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences' study panels. HUGH POPENOE is Professor of Soils, Agronomy, Botany, and Geog-

72 AMARANTH raphy and Director of the Center for Tropical Agriculture and International Programs (Agriculture) at the University of Florida. He received his B.S. from the University of California, Davis, in 1951 and his Ph.D. in soils from the University of Florida in 1960. His principal research interest has been in the area of tropical agriculture and land use. Dr. Popenoe's early work in shifting cultivation is one of the few contributions to knowledge of this system. He has traveled and worked in most of the countries in the tropical areas of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. He has served as Director of the Florida Sea Grant College, is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Escuela Agricola Panamericana in Honduras, and was Chairman of the Board for several years. He is a Visiting Lecturer on Tropical Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Agronomy, the American Geographical Society, and the International Soils Science Society. He has served as Chairman of the Joint Research Committee of the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development (Title XII). He was Chairman of the Advisory Committee for Technology Innovation and a member of the Board on Science and Technology for International Development of the National Academy of Sciences. ALFREDO SANCHEZ-MORROQUIN is a Research Scientist with the CIAMEC division of INIA (National Institute of Agriculture Re- search) in Chapingo, Mexico, and technical adviser of four agroin- dustries of Mexico and South America. After completing his B.Sc. in chemistry and microbiology at the National Polytechnic Institute, School of Biological Sciences, and his M.S. from Northwestern University, he joined the Polytechnic Institute as Professor of Criptogamic Botany and later as Chairman of the Department of Microbiology. In 1951 he received a D.Sc. degree from the National University of Mexico when he was working at the Faculty of Chemistry as Professor of Chemical Microbiology and later as Chairman of the Biology Department. He also worked with the School of Agronomy and the Post-Graduate College of the Secretary of Agriculture and was invited to be a visiting professor and scientific investigator in several South American universities and technological institutes. His research has focused on biotechnology: single-cell protein, fermentations, plant products, and food processing. He has published more than 100 papers, five books, and several journal articles and booklets. In 1979 he was appointed Emeritus Professor by the National Polytechnic Institute. In the same year he was awarded three national prizes in science and technology. JONATHAN D. SAUER is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received a B.A. in 1939 from the

APPENDIX D 73 University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in botany at Washington University, St. Louis, and the Missouri Botanical Garden in 1950. From then until 1967, when he joined UCLA, he was on the botany faculty of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His dissertation was on the grain amaranths, and he has continued to be interested in them and their wild relatives, trying to identify specimens sent in for taxonomic determination. His current research is primarily on ecology and geography of tropical seashore vegetation. ROBIN M. SAUNDERS is Research Leader of the Cereals Research Unit, Western Regional Research Center, USDA, Albany, California. He has a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Birmingham (1960) and Newcastle (1963) universities, England, respectively. In 1966, after two years of postdoctoral work in biochemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, and one year in medical research in Pennsyl- vania, he joined USDA. In his current position, he directs a large research group engaged in various aspects of cereal-grain utilization, including development of crops tolerant to drought, temperature, and saline stress. JOSEPH P. SENFT, formerly coordinator of nutritional programs at the Rodale Research Center, received a B.S. degree in biology from Juniata College in 1959 and M.S. and Ph.D degrees in biology from the State University of New York, Buffalo, in 1961 and 1965, respectively. His research has been on the evaluation of nutritional quality of both grain and vegetable amaranth. His research in agriculture has focused on soil-plant nutritional relationships. ARRIS A. SIGLE is a farmer in north central Kansas. He received his B.S. degree in agricultural engineering from Kansas State University in 1973. He has been working with grain amaranth test plots and research since 1978. In 1981 he harvested and successfully marketed 14 acres of amaranth. He also grows wheat and milo and is in charge of a 200-head flock of ewes. He is especially interested in repairing, modifying, and designing new equipment to make his work with these projects more efficient. THEODORE w. suoiA is Senior Scientist, National Park Service. He received his B.S. from Kent State University in 1950 and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1951 and 1954, respectively. He taught at Winona State College, Winona, Minnesota, and at the University of Minnesota where he was in the Department of Plant Pathology and Physiology. From 1967 to 1969 he was the Associate Director of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. In 1969 Dr. Sudia joined the National Park Service as Research Biologist. He has served as Chief, Ecological Services Division; Chief Scientist and Associate Director for Science and Technology of the Park Service; and Deputy Science Advisor of the National Park Service.

74 AMARANTH His research interests have ranged from plant ecology to environ- mental physiology. He is a Fellow of the AAAS. JAMES L. VETTER is Vice-Prcsident, Technical, of the American Institute of Baking, a nonprofit research and educational organiza- tion. Dr. Vetter received an A.B. degree with a major in chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis in 1954 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in food technology from the University of Illinois in 1955 and 1958, respectively. Before joining the American Institute of Baking in 1977, he had a 10-year industrial research career working for companies in or related to the baking industry. These companies include Monsanto Company, Standard Brands, and Keebler Com- pany. Dr. Vetter's current responsibilities involve administration of research activities related to the nutrition and science and technology of baking. DAVID ERVIN WALSH is the Director and Vice-President of Research of the General Nutrition Corporation. He received his B.A. from St. Cloud State University in 1961 and an M.A. and Ph.D. from North Dakota State University, where he was an Associate Professor of Cereal Chemistry and Technology until 1974, when he joined the staff of General Nutrition Corporation in Fargo, North Dakota. His work includes computerization of food processing, research on lipids of barley, proteins of wheat, and on the industrial utilization of wheat. His present research includes: directing the corporation research program in food and cosmetic development, nutrition research on food supplements and health, and coordination of grants and aid programs for academic research directed toward food supplements and nutrition. NOEL D. VIETMEYER, staff officer for this study, is Professional Associate of the Board on Science and Technology for International Development. A New Zealander with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, he now works on innovations in science that are important for developing countries.

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