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Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop (1984)

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Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
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Page 77
Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"BOSTID Publications." National Research Council. 1984. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19381.
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Page 82

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

77 Board on Science and Technology for International Development (JH-217D) Office of International Affairs National Research Council 2101 Constitution Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20418, USA How to Order BOSTID Reports Reports published by the Board on Science and Technology for International Development are sponsored in most instances by the U.S. Agency for Interna- tional Development and are intended for free distribution primarily to readers in developing countries. A limited number of copies are available without charge to readers in the United States and other industrialized countries who are affiliated with governmental, educational, or research institutions, and who have profes- sional interest in the subjects treated by the report. Requests should be made on the institution's stationary. Single copies of published reports listed below are available free from BOSTID at the above address while the supplies last. Energy 19. Methane Generation from Human, Animal, and Agricultural Wastes. 1977. 131 pp. Discusses means by which natural process of anaerobic fermentation can be controlled by man for his benefit and how the methane gen- erated can be used as a fuel. 33. Alcohol Fuels: Options for Developing Countries. 1983. 128 pp. Ex- amines the potential for the production and utilization of alcohol fuels in devel- oping countries. Includes information on various tropical crops and their con- version to alcohols through both traditional and novel processes. 36. Producer Gas: Another Fuel for Motor Transport. 1983. 112 pp. Dur- ing World War II Europe and Asia used wood, charcoal, and coal to fuel over a million gasoline and diesel vehicles. However, the technology has since been vir- tually forgotten. This report reviews producer gas and its modern potential. 39. Proceedings, International Workshop on Energy Survey Methodologies for Developing Countries. 1980. 220 pp. Report of a 1980 workshop organized to examine past and ongoing energy survey efforts in developing countries. In- cludes reports from rural, urban, industry, and transportation working groups, excerpts from 12 background papers, and a directory of energy surveys for developing countries. Technology Options for Developing Countries 14. More Water for Arid Lands: Promising Technologies and Research Op- portunities. 1974. 153 pp. Outlines little-known but promising technologies to supply and conserve water in arid areas. (French language edition is available from BOSTID.)

78 AMARANTH 21. Making Aquatic Weeds Useful: Some Perspectives for Developing Countries. 1976. 175 pp. Describes ways to exploit aquatic weeds for grazing, and by harvesting and processing for use as compost, animal feed, pulp, paper, and fuel. Also describes utilization for sewage and industrial wastewater treat- ment. Examines certain plants with potential for aquaculture. 28. Microbial Processes: Promising Technologies for Developing Coun- tries. 1979. 198 pp. Discusses the potential importance of microbiology in de- veloping countries in food and feed, plant nutrition, pest control, fuel and energy, waste treatment and utilization, and health. 31. Food, Fuel, and Fertilizer for Organic Wastes. 1981. 150 pp. Ex- amines some of the opportunities for the productive utilization of organic wastes and residues commonly found in the poorer rural areas of the world. 34. Priorities in Biotechnology Research for International Development: Proceedings of a Workshop. 1982. 261 pp. Report of a 1982 workshop organ- ized to examine opportunities for biotechnology research in developing coun- tries. Includes general background papers and specific recommendations in six areas: 1) vaccines, 2) animal production, 3) monoclonal antibodies, 4) energy, 5) biological nitrogen fixation, and 6) plant cell and tissue culture. Plants 16. Underexploited Tropical Plants with Promising Economic Value. 1975. 187 pp. Describes 36 little-known tropical plants that, with research, could become important cash and food crops in the future. Includes cereals, roots and tubers, vegetables, fruits, oilseeds, forage plants, and others. 25. Tropical Legumes: Resources for the Future. 1979. 331 pp. Describes plants of the family Leguminosae, including root crops, pulses, fruits, forages, timber and wood products, ornamentals, and others. 37. The Winged Bean: A High Protein Crop for the Tropics. (Second Edi- tion). 1981. 59 pp. An update of BOSTID's 1975 report of this neglected tropical legume. Describes current knowledge of winged bean and its promise. 47. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. 1984. 90 pp. Before the time of Cortez grain amaranths were staple foods of the Aztec and Inca. Today this extremely nutritious food has a bright future. The report also discusses vegetable amaranths. 53. Jojoba: New Crop for Arid Lands. 1984. Describes Simmondsia chi- nensis, a North American desert shrub whose seeds are rich in a unique vegetable oil with considerable potential as an industrial raw material. Innovations in Tropical Reforestation 27. Firewood Crops: Shrub and Tree Species for Energy Production. 1980. 237 pp. Examines the selection of species suitable for deliberate cultivation as firewood crops in developing countries.

79 35. Sowing Forests from the Air. 1981. 64 pp. Describes experiences with establishing forests by sowing tree seed from aircraft. Suggests testing and devel- opment of the techniques for possible use where forest destructions now out- paces reforestation. 40. Firewood Crops: Shrub and Tree Species for Energy Production. Volume II. 1983.92 pp. A continuation of BOSTID report number 27. Describes 27 species of woody plants that seem suitable candidates for fuelwood plantations in developing countries. 41. Mangium and Other Fast-Growing Acacias for the Humid Tropics. 1983. 63 pp. Highlights ten acacias species that are native to the tropical rain forest of Australasia. That they could become valuable forestry resources else- where is suggested by the exceptional performance of Acacia mangium in Malaysia. 42. Calliandra: A Versatile Small Tree for the Humid Tropics. 1983. 56 pp. This Latin American shrub is being widely planted by villagers and govern- ment agencies in Indonesia to provide firewood, prevent erosion, yield honey, and feed livestock. 43. Casuarinas: Nitrogen-Fixing Trees for Adverse Sites. 1983. 118 pp. These robust nitrogen-fixing Australasian trees could become valuable re- sources for planting on harsh, eroding land to provide fuel and other products. Eighteen species for tropical lowlands and highlands, temperate zones, and semiarid regions are highlighted. 52. Leucaena: Promising Forage and Tree Crop for the Tropics. (Second Edition). 1984. 110 pp. Describes a multipurpose tree crop of potential value for much of the humid lowland tropics. Leucaena is one of the fastest growing and most useful trees for the tropics. Managing Tropical Animal Resources 32. The Water Buffalo: New Prospects for an Underutilized Animal. 1981. 118 pp. The water buffalo is performing notably well in recent trials in such unexpected places as the United States, Australia, and Brazil. Report discusses the animal's promise, particularly emphasizing its potential for use out- side Asia. 44. Butterfly Farming in Papua New Guinea. 1983. 36 pp. Indigenous butterflies are being reared in Papua New Guinea villages in a formal govern- ment program that both provides a cash income in remote rural areas and con- tributes to the conservation of wildlife and tropical forests. 45. Crocodiles as a Resource for the Tropics. 1983. 60 pp. In most parts of the tropics crocodilian populations are being decimated, but programs in Papua New Guinea and a few other countries demonstrate that, with care, the animals can be raised for profit while the wild populations are being protected. 46. Little-Known Asian Animals with a Promising Economic Future. 1983. 124 pp. Describes banteng, madura, mithan, yak, kouprey, babirusa, Javan warty pig, and other obscure, but possibly globally useful, wild and domesticated animals that are indigenous to Asia.

80 AMARANTH General 29. Postharvest Food Losses in Developing Countries. 1978. 202 pp. Assesses potential and limitations of food-loss reduction efforts; summarizes ex- isting work and information about losses of major food crops and fish; discusses economic and social factors involved; identifies major areas of need; and sug- gests policy and program options for developing countries and technical assistance agencies. 30. U.S. Science and Technology for Development: Contributions to the UN Conference. 1978. 226 pp. Serves the U.S. Department of State as a major background document for the U.S. national paper, 1979 United Nations Con- ference on Science and Technology for Development. For a complete list of publications, including those that are out of print and available only through NT1S, please write to BOSTID at the address above.

ORDER FORM While the limited supply lasts, a free copy of Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop will be sent to institutionally affiliated persons (in government, education, or research) upon written request on your organization's letterhead or by submission of the form below. Please indicate on the labels the names, titles, and addresses, including country, of qualified recipients and their institutions who would be interested to have this report. Please return this form to BOSTID (JH-217D) National Research Council 2101 Constitution Avenue Washington, D.C. 20418, USA Please type or print clearly. Name Title _ Mailing Address Country 47 Name Title _ Mailing Address Country 47 Name Title _ Mailing Address Country 47 81

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