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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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APPENDIX A Background Papers

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: SELECTED CASE STUDIES*

John S. Wilson and Brent M. Haddad

INTRODUCTION: THE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER CHALLENGE

In April 1990, the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering sponsored a workshop on the diffusion and transfer of innovative technologies. The workshop was part of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy's study of the government's role in civilian technology.

The primary objectives of the workshop were the identification of factors that contribute to successful technology transfer and of the impact collaborative technology transfer ventures have on the pace of technological change and technology commercialization. The discussions focused on technology transfer in three settings: within a single company; from one company to another; and from federal laboratories and universities to industry. The role

*  

Vincent J. Ruddy contributed to the preparation of this summary.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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Page 140
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIXES." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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As U.S. industry faces worldwide challenges, policymakers are asking questions about the role of the federal government--not only in promoting basic research but also in ushering new innovations to the marketplace. This book offers an expert consensus on how government and industry together can respond to the new realities of a global marketplace.

The volume offers firm conclusions about policy and organizational changes with the greatest potential to improve our technological competitiveness--and presents three alternative approaches for a new federal role.

The volume examines

  • How federal involvement in technology development affects the nation's economic well-being.
  • What we can learn from past federal efforts to stimulate civilian technology development--in the United States and among our major industrial competitors.
  • How trends in productivity, R&D, and other key areas have affected U.S. performance, and how we compare to the world's rising industrial economies.

Offering guidance on one of the 1990s most important issues, this volume will be indispensible to federal policymakers, executives in industry and technology, and researchers.

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