National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance (1992)

Chapter: B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY

« Previous: A BACKGROUND PAPERS
Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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prove the effectiveness and efficiency of these types of cooperative arrangements. A special emphasis shall be placed on discussions of these subjects among industry leaders, labor leaders, and officials of the executive branch and Congress. The Secretary is authorized to seek and accept funding for this study from both Federal agencies and private industry.

''(2) The members of the review panel shall be drawn from among industry and labor leaders, entrepreneurs, former government officials with great experience in civilian research and technology, and scientific and technical experts, including experts with experience with Federal laboratories.

''(3) The review shall analyze the strengths and weaknesses of different types of Federal-industry cooperative arrangements in civilian technology, including but not limited to—

"(A) Federal programs which provide technical services and information to United States companies;

"(B) cooperation between Federal laboratories and United States companies, including activities under the Technology Share Program created by Executive Order 12591;

"(C) Federal research and technology transfer arrangements with selected business sectors;

"(D) Federal encouragement of, and assistance to, private joint research and development ventures; and

"(E) such other mechanisms of Federal-industry cooperation as may be identified by the Secretary.

"(4) A report based on the findings and recommendations of the review panel shall be submitted to the Secretary, the President, and Congress within 18 months after the Secretary signs the contracts with the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering.

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD-HOUSE SECTION 5131(C)

"National Academies of Science and Engineering Study of Government-Industry Cooperation in Civilian Technology

Present Law

"No provision.

Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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House Bill

"No provision.

Senate Amendment

"Specifies that the Director may contract periodically with the Academies to receive advice and studies on the nation's significant national needs and opportunities in manufacturing and emerging technologies. The bill specified the responsibilities of the review panel of the Academies.

Conference Agreement

"The Conferees agree to accept the Senate proposal authorizing the Secretary of Commerce to contract with the Academies, including the Institute of Medicine, for a review of the various types of arrangements under which the private sector in the United States and the Federal Government cooperate in civilian research and technology and technology transfer. Panelists are to be drawn from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and the Academies should also draw on the expertise of its Board of Assessments for NIST. The purpose of the review is to provide the Secretary of Commerce and the Congress with objective information regarding the uses of the various types of cooperative technology arrangements currently being applied in the United States, as well as a candid assessment of which of these arrangements work well and what conditions are necessary for them to work. The Conferees note that there have been a sizable number of programs set up legislatively and administratively over the past decade and feel that there should be enough experience from the initial experiments under these programs for the Academies to reach some conclusions regarding effectiveness and to make recommendations for improvement. The Conferees feel that this study will help guide the government properly to invest in the most promising of these alternatives. The proposal supersedes studies by the Academies under the Semiconductor and Superconductor Research section of the Technology Reviews in Title XLIII of the Senate bill. The Secretary of Commerce is to seek funding for this review from other federal agencies and private industry. A report is to be submitted to the Secretary of Commerce, the President, and the Congress within eighteen months after the contracts are signed with the Academies."

Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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APPENDIX C Workshop Presenters and Briefers to the Panel

Workshop on "THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES: LESSONS OF SUCCESS"THE GOVERNMENT ROLE IN CIVILIAN TECHNOLOGY PROJECT April 19-20, 1990

PRESENTERS

Reid G. Adler, Director of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of Health

Arnold L. Bement, Jr., Vice President of Technical Resources, TRW, Inc.

Harvey J. Berger, President of Research & Development Division, Centocor, Inc.

Jeff Bingaman, Chairman, Defense Industry & Technology Subcommittee, Armed Services Committee, U.S. Senate

Samuel H. Fuller, Vice President of Research, Digital Equipment Corporation

Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 180
Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 182
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As U.S. industry faces worldwide challenges, policymakers are asking questions about the role of the federal government--not only in promoting basic research but also in ushering new innovations to the marketplace. This book offers an expert consensus on how government and industry together can respond to the new realities of a global marketplace.

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Offering guidance on one of the 1990s most important issues, this volume will be indispensible to federal policymakers, executives in industry and technology, and researchers.

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