National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance (1992)

Chapter: C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL

« Previous: B LEGISLATIVE REQUEST FOR THE STUDY
Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
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Joseph Gormley, Director of Electrical/Electronic Systems Engineering Office, Ford Motor Company

Donald A. Hicks, Professor of Political Economics, Bruton Center for Development Studies, University of Texas at Dallas

William G. Howard, Jr., Senior Fellow, National Academy of Engineering

Cherri J. Langenfeld, Acting Director, Office of Technology Policy, U.S. Department of Energy

John W. Lyons, Director of National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce

Alexander MacLachlan, Senior Vice President of Technology, DuPont Company

John S. Mayo, Senior Vice President of Network Systems and Network Services, AT&T Bell Labs

Edward A. Miller, President, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences

Parviz Mokhtari, Corporate Vice President and Assistant General Manager, Automotive and Industrial Electronics Group, Motorola, Inc.

Thomas J. Murrin, Deputy Secretary of Commerce, U.S. Department of Commerce

Walt Plosila, President of Montgomery County High-Technology Council

Niels Reimers, Acting Director of Office of Technology Licensing, University of California at Berkeley

William Ribbens, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department, University of Michigan

James Sherblom, Transgenic Sciences, Inc.

Jack Simon, Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, General Motors Corporation

H. Guyford Stever, Corporate Director and Science Advisor

David H. Swanson, Economic Development, Georgia Tech Research Institute

Robert A. Weinberg, Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

James B. Wyngaarden, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President

Gerold Yonas, Director of Laboratory Staff, Sandia National Laboratories

Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×

Workshop on "RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIA: MYTH AND REALITY" THE GOVERNMENT ROLE IN CIVILIAN TECHNOLOGY PROJECT AND THE ACADEMY INDUSTRY PROGRAM March 26-27, 1991

PRESENTERS

John A. Armstrong, Vice President of IBM Corporation

Harvey J. Berger, M.D., Chairman and CEO, ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Frank P. Carrubba, Director of Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Hewlett-Packard Company

John M. Deutch, Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Craig I. Fields, President and CEO Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation

Kenneth Flamm, Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution

Robert W. Galvin, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Motorola

Gregory Gardiner, Director, Research Operations, Pfizer Central Research, Pfizer, Inc.

Kiyoshi Hasegawa, Executive Director, Optoelectronics Technology Research Corporation

John W. Lyons, Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Robert M. Price, Retired Chairman and CEO, Control Data Corporation

William J. Spencer, President and CEO, SEMATECH

Karl H. Zaininger, President and CEO, Siemens Corporate Research, Inc.

INDIVIDUAL BRIEFINGS

RICHARD BERNSTEIN, Defense Intelligence Agency

PETER CANNON, President and CEO, Conductus, Inc.

MITCHELL DOSSETT, Defense Intelligence Agency

IRWIN FELLER, Pennsylvania State University

CARY GRAVATT, National Institute of Standards and Technology

RONALD KELLER, Defense Intelligence Agency

VICTOR REIS, Director, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×

WILLIAM RUTTER, Chairman, Chiron Corporation

JOHN B. TAYLOR, Council of Economic Advisors, Executive Office of the President

JOHN WARNER, Vice President, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group

ROBERT M. WHITE, Undersecretary of Commerce for Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce

LEO YOUNG, U.S. Department of Defense

Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×

APPENDIX D Biographical Information on Panel Members and Professional Staff

PANEL MEMBERS

HAROLD BROWN, Chairman, is Chairman of the Foreign Policy Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He also serves as a member of the Board of Directors of IBM, CBS, and Cummins Engine Company, among other companies. Dr. Brown was Secretary of Defense from 1977 until 1981. From 1969 until 1977, he was President of the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Brown served as Director of Defense Research and Engineering from 1961 to 1965. He subsequently became Secretary of the Air Force, a post he held until 1969. Before beginning his Defense Department work in 1961, Dr. Brown had been Director of the Radiation Laboratory at Livermore, University of California and a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee.

JOHN A. ARMSTRONG is Vice President and Director of Research for IBM. In 1989, he was elected to the Corporate Management Board. Since joining IBM in 1963, he has held several positions within the company's research laboratories, including Director of Physical Sciences and Manager of Materials and Technology Development. Previously he was Chairman of the Advisory Board for Physics of the National Science Foundation. In 1987, Dr. Armstrong was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. Dr. Armstrong has written or co-authored more than 50 scientific papers on the

Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 184
Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"C WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND BRIEFERS TO THE PANEL." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. 1992. The Government Role in Civilian Technology: Building a New Alliance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1998.
×
Page 186
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As U.S. industry faces worldwide challenges, policymakers are asking questions about the role of the federal government--not only in promoting basic research but also in ushering new innovations to the marketplace. This book offers an expert consensus on how government and industry together can respond to the new realities of a global marketplace.

The volume offers firm conclusions about policy and organizational changes with the greatest potential to improve our technological competitiveness--and presents three alternative approaches for a new federal role.

The volume examines

  • How federal involvement in technology development affects the nation's economic well-being.
  • What we can learn from past federal efforts to stimulate civilian technology development--in the United States and among our major industrial competitors.
  • How trends in productivity, R&D, and other key areas have affected U.S. performance, and how we compare to the world's rising industrial economies.

Offering guidance on one of the 1990s most important issues, this volume will be indispensible to federal policymakers, executives in industry and technology, and researchers.

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