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Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies (1992)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
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Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Stephen E. Fienberg (Chair) is professor of statistics and law and vice president (academic affairs) at York University, Toronto, Canada. He was formerly Maurice Falk professor of statistics and social science and dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University, and he has held positions at the University of Chicago and the University of Minnesota. His principal research has been on the development of statistical methodology, especially in connection with the analysis of cross-classified data and, more recently, the design and analysis of experiments and sample surveys, as well as the application of statistics. He has been coordinating and applications editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association and was cofounding editor of Chance. He was chair of the Committee on National Statistics from 1981 to 1987 and cochair of its Panel on Statistical Assessments as Evidence in the Courts. He received a B.Sc. honours degree in mathematics and statistics from the University of Toronto and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Harvard University.

Barbara F. Freed is professor of modern languages and chair of the modern languages program at Carnegie Mellon University. She was previously vice dean for language instruction at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was also director of the Regional Center for Language Proficiency. Her primary research interests include the integration of cognitive and social perspectives in second language acquisition, in both natural and classroom settings; she is also interested in the implications for instructional design and delivery that derive from these

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×

areas of inquiry. She received a B.A. degree in French from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. degree in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) from Temple University, and a Ph.D. degree in linguistics in education from the University of Pennsylvania.

Kenji Hakuta is professor of education at Stanford University. His research areas are in language acquisition, bilingualism, and bilingual education. He has held teaching positions at Yale University and the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and a member of the Human Development and Aging Study Section of the National Institutes of Health, and he chairs the Board of Trustees of the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C. He receiving Ph.D. degree in experimental psychology from Harvard University.

Lyle V. Jones is professor of psychology and director of the L.L. Thurstone Psychometric Laboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he previously served as vice chancellor and dean of the graduate school. He was a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow, a faculty member at the University of Chicago, and has held visiting faculty positions at the Universities of Illinois, Texas, and Washington. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. At the National Research Council, he currently is a member of the Board on Associateship and Fellowship Programs and a member of the Report Review Committee. Among his recent publications are several that focus on historical trends in U.S. school achievement, with emphasis on trends for minority students. He attended Reed College, received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Washington, and received a Ph.D. degree in psychology and statistics from Stanford University.

Kathryn Blackmond Laskey is associate professor in the Department of Systems Engineering at George Mason University. Her research interests include the use of probability models in artificial intelligence and methods of combining information from multiple sensors. Prior to joining the George Mason faculty, she was a principal scientist at Decision Science Consortium, where she developed computerized decision support systems and performed research in automated reasoning under uncertainty. She received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. degree in statistics and public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University.

Michael M. Meyer (Study Director) is senior research scientist in the Departments of Statistics and Academic Computing and Media at Carnegie Mellon University. He previously held an academic appointment in the Department of Statistics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include statistical computing, categorical data analysis, and statistical modeling in neuropsychology. He has been the book reviews editor for Chance and is an associate editor for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×

Statistics and Computing. He received a B.A. honours degree in mathematics from the University of Western Australia and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from the University of Minnesota.

Luis C. Moll is associate professor in the Department of Language, Reading and Culture, College of Education, University of Arizona. He worked from 1979 to 1986 as research psychologist at the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition, University of California, San Diego. His research interests include childhood development and education, literacy learning and bilingualism, and sociocultural psychology. His recent publications include the analysis of the uses of knowledge in Latino households and the application of this knowledge in developing classroom practice. He was awarded a Ph.D. degree in early childhood development/educational psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

P. David Pearson is a professor in the area of literacy education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he also serves as dean of the College of Education. Prior to his appointment as dean, he served as codirector of the Center for the Study of Reading, where he continues to pursue a line of research in literacy instruction and assessment. He is originator and coeditor of two volumes of the Handbook of Reading Research, past editor of Reading Research Quarterly, and author of numerous research, policy, and practice articles about literacy processes, instruction, and assessment. He was the 1989 recipient of the Oscar Causey Award for contributions to research from the National Reading Conference and the 1990 William S. Gray Citation of Merit from the International Reading Association for his contributions to reading research and instruction. Professor Pearson received a bachelor's degree in history from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota.

John E. Rolph is senior statistician at the RAND Corporation, where he has also served as head of RAND's statistical group. He has held faculty positions at University College London, Columbia University, the RAND Graduate School for Policy Studies, and the RAND/UCLA Health Policy Center. His research interests include empirical Bayes methods and the application of statistics to health policy, civil justice, criminal justice, and other policy areas. He has been an associate editor of two American Statistical Association journals and is currently a member of the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Law and Justice. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Paul R. Rosenbaum is professor of statistics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he had been a senior research scientist at Educational Testing Service and taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Much of his research has concerned the design and interpretation of observational

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×

studies. He received a B.A. degree in statistics from Hampshire College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Harvard University.

Donald B. Rubin is professor of statistics and chair of the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. Previously, he was professor of statistics and of education at the University of Chicago and chair of the Statistics Research Group at Educational Testing Service. His research has dealt with causal inference in experimental and observational studies, missing data and nonresponse in surveys, and applied Bayesian statistics, including computational methods. He has been coordinating and applications editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association; he is currently a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and an M.S. degree in computer science and a Ph.D degree in statistics, both from Harvard University.

Keith F. Rust is associate director of the statistical group at Westat, Inc., in Rockville, Maryland. His former positions include supervisor in the Statistical Services Branch of the Australian Bureau of Statistics and visiting assistant professor at the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan. His research interests include the methodology of the design and analysis of sample surveys. He is an editor of the Journal of Official Statistics. He received a B.A. honours degree in mathematics from the Flinders University of South Australia and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.

Burton H. Singer is chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and Associate Dean for Public Health at Yale University. He is also chair of the Steering Committee for Social and Economic Research of the Tropical Disease Program at the World Health Organization, chair of the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics, and a member of the board of directors of the Social Science Research Council. He has written books and articles on labor economics, epidemiology of tropical diseases, statistics, mathematical models in biology. He received a B.S. degree in engineering science and an M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Case Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Stanford University.

Herbert L. Smith is associate professor of sociology and research associate in the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He taught previously at Indiana University and has been a visiting research fellow at the Population Sciences Division of the Rockefeller Foundation. He has written primarily on social demography, sociology of education, and research design. He received a B.A. degree in history and sociology from Yale University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology in population and human ecology from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1992. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2014.
×
Page 123
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Bilingual education has long been the subject of major disagreements in this country. This book provides a detailed critique of the two largest studies of U.S. bilingual education programs. It examines the goals of the studies and what can be learned from them. In addition, using these studies as cases, this book provides guidelines on how to plan large evaluation studies to achieve useful answers to major policy questions about education.

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