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Immigration Policy and the Search for Skilled Workers: Summary of a Workshop (2015)

Chapter: Appendix C: List of Participants

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Immigration Policy and the Search for Skilled Workers: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20145.
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Appendix C

List of Participants

Ayse Deniz Alpay, Northwestern University

Stuart Anderson, National Foundation for American Policy

Jon Beamer, Cognizant

Meg Blume-Kohout, MBK Analytics, LLC

Michael Clemens, Center for Global Development

Stephanie DeLuca, American Chemical Society

Renee Dopplick, Association for Computing Machinery

Ricardo Gambetta, National Immigration Forum

Daniel Goroff, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Matt Graham, Bipartisan Policy Center

Melvin Greer, Lockheed Martin

Jong-on Hahm, George Mason University

Russell Harrison, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

Tim Harrison, Migration Advisory Committee (UK)

Derek Hill, National Science Foundation

Ron Hira, Howard University

Xiaochu Hu, University of the District of Columbia

Victoria Jackson, Small Business Administration

Matthew Johnson, McBee Strategic Consulting

Eunhye Kim, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Jeff Lande, The Lande Group

Rosa Lee, George Washington Institute of Public Policy

Keri Moss, American Chemical Society

Suparna Mukherjee, George Washington University

David Raffert, Congressional Budget Office

Neil Ruiz, Brookings Institution

Kirsten Schuettler, World Bank

Edward Schumacher-Matos, National Public Radio

Meredith Singer, IBM

Al Teich, George Washington University

Patrick Thibodeau, Computerworld

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Immigration Policy and the Search for Skilled Workers: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20145.
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Gautham Venugopalan, U.S. Department of State

Max Voegler, German Research Foundation

Philip Webre, Congressional Budget Office

Brad Wible, Science Magazine

Andrew Yewdell, Council for Global Immigration

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Immigration Policy and the Search for Skilled Workers: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20145.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Participants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Immigration Policy and the Search for Skilled Workers: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20145.
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The market for high-skilled workers is becoming increasingly global, as are the markets for knowledge and ideas. While high-skilled immigrants in the United States represent a much smaller proportion of the workforce than they do in countries such as Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom, these immigrants have an important role in spurring innovation and economic growth in all countries and filling shortages in the domestic labor supply.

This report summarizes the proceedings of a Fall 2014 workshop that focused on how immigration policy can be used to attract and retain foreign talent. Participants compared policies on encouraging migration and retention of skilled workers, attracting qualified foreign students and retaining them post-graduation, and input by states or provinces in immigration policies to add flexibility in countries with regional employment differences, among other topics. They also discussed how immigration policies have changed over time in response to undesired labor market outcomes and whether there was sufficient data to measure those outcomes.

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