National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
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A


Committee Member Biographies

David J. Tollerud (Chair) is Professor and Chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences. He received his M.D. from Mayo Medical School in 1978 and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1990. Dr. Tollerud has extensive clinical training, with specialty board certifications in internal medicine, pulmonary and critical care medicine, and environmental and occupational medicine, with a long-standing interest in the health of disadvantaged and underserved populations. Dr. Tollerud’s research interests include the effects of environmental pollution on asthma and other health problems, particularly among children and inner-city disadvantaged populations; nanoparticles; and stem-cell transplants. A second area of research interest is strategies to prevent work-related injury and illness. Dr. Tollerud has published more than 90 peer-reviewed scientific articles, books, and book chapters, is a member of numerous professional and scientific organizations, and sits on a number of local, national, and international committees dealing with environmental, occupational, and public health issues. He has chaired several Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including most recently the Committee on the Disposition of the Air Force Health Study, the Committee on the Management of the Air Force Health Study Data and Specimens (standing committee), the Committee on Epidemiologic Study: Shipboard Hazard and Defense II, and the Committee on the Long-Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Mary N. Haan is Professor and Vice Chair of Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
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where she has been on faculty since 2009. Before this appointment, she was a professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan’s Graduate School of Public Health, where she taught and directed a T32 interdisciplinary program on aging and public health. Her previous positions have also included faculty at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine; an investigator at Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research; and as an epidemiologist at the California Department of Health Services. Her research career has focused on health disparities in relation to ethnicity and race in aging populations. She has been involved in several major longitudinal studies of vascular and metabolic risk factors in aging populations, including as principal investigator of the Sacramento Longitudinal Study on Aging, which she began in 1997 and is ongoing. Her areas of expertise include the epidemiology of aging, dementia, diabetes, and race and ethnic disparities. She has and continues to serve as a reviewer of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions related to aging for the National Institutes of Health, including the National Institute on Aging study sections, as well as for other national and international research agencies. Dr. Haan has more than 160 peer-reviewed publications, chapters, and books. She was President of the Society for Epidemiologic Research for 3 years and has had active leadership roles in the Alzheimer’s Association, Conference Series on Aging in the Americas, and the International Stroke Association. Dr. Haan received her M.P.H. in Public Health Policy in 1975 and her Dr.P.H. in Epidemiology in 1986 from the University of California, Berkeley.

Kenneth W. Kizer is a Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, and the Director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement, UC Davis Health System. He is an internationally respected health care leader and one of very few persons elected to both the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration. Dr. Kizer’s professional experience includes positions in academia, philanthropy, and the public and private sectors. His previous positions have included President, CEO, and Chairman of Medsphere Systems Corporation, a leading commercial provider of open source health information technology; founding President and CEO, National Quality Forum, a national quality improvement and consensus standards setting organization; Under Secretary for Health, Department of Veterans Affairs, and CEO of the nation’s largest health care system, in which capacity he engineered what is widely considered the largest and most successful health care “turnaround” in U.S. history; Director, California Department of Health Services; and Director, California Emergency Medical Services Authority. He has served on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and as Chairman of The California Wellness Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted solely to health promotion and disease prevention, as well as on the governing boards of managed care and health information technology companies, several foundations and various profes-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×

sional associations, and nonprofit organizations. He also has served as an advisor to numerous foreign countries on health-related matters. Dr. Kizer is an honors graduate of Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles, the recipient of two honorary doctorates, a fellow or distinguished fellow of 10 professional societies, and is board certified in six medical specialties and/or subspecialties. He has authored more than 400 original articles, book chapters, and other reports. He has served on numerous IOM committees, including most recently the Board on the Health of Select Populations (standing committee), the Medical Follow-Up Agency Advisory Committee (standing committee), and the Committee on the Management of the Air Force Health Study Data and Specimens (standing committee); as well as the Committee on the Assessment of Ongoing Efforts in the Treatment of PTSD; the Committee on the Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families; and the Committee on the Long-term Effects of Blast Exposures.

Diane Leong is the Director of Biobanking and Human Biological Sample Management group at Gilead Sciences, Inc. In her current position, Dr. Leong is responsible for establishing business processes and infrastructure for the collection and management of biological samples from clinical trials and research collaborations to support biomarker group research. Prior to her current position, Dr. Leong worked at several pharmaceutical companies, where she served as the associate director of several laboratories and has expertise in the preparation of DNA for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping for disease predisposition and pharmacogenetics studies, and high-throughput pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics analysis of clinical trial patient samples. Dr. Leong has a long history of published papers and abstracts, has been awarded four patents for the detection of bacteria in different body fluids, and has received numerous awards for her work. Dr. Leong received her B.A. in bacteriology from the University of California, Berkeley, and in 1985 received her Ph.D. in microbiology and molecular genetics from Harvard University.

Bradley Malin is an Associate Professor and the Vice Chair of Biomedical Informatics in the School of Medicine, an Associate Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering, and an Affiliated Faculty Member of the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society at Vanderbilt University. He is the founder and current director of the Health Information Privacy Laboratory (HIPLab), an interdisciplinary endeavor that was established to address the growing need for data privacy research and development for the rapidly expanding health information technology sector. In addition to its role as a scientific research program, for the past several years the HIPLab has functioned as a data privacy consultation service for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network, a consortium sponsored by the National Human Genome Research Institute and National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Under the direction of Dr. Malin, the HIPLab

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×

has made contributions to a number of health-related areas, including intelligent auditing technologies to protect electronic medical records from misuse in the context of primary care, as well as algorithms to formally anonymize patient information disseminated for secondary research purposes. Dr. Malin was honored as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. Dr. Malin completed his education at Carnegie Mellon University, where he received his B.S. in biological sciences, his M.S. in data mining and knowledge discovery, a master’s of philosophy in public policy and management, and his Ph.D. in computer science.

Lisa M. McShane is a Mathematical Statistician in the Biometric Research Branch, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where she works on the development of statistical methods for the evaluation of cancer biomarkers. She is also a statistical reviewer for biomarker study protocols and a statistical advisor to Cancer Diagnosis and Cancer Therapy Evaluation Programs. Prior to her current position at NCI, Dr. McShane was a Senior Staff Fellow in the Clinical and Diagnostic Trials Section of the Biometry Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, where she worked on developing statistical methods and collaborative research for cancer prevention trials and epidemiologic studies. In 1995, she was awarded with the National Institutes of Health Award of Merit, and in 2008 she received the National Institutes of Health Director’s Award in recognition of work in the development and application of innovative trial designs for predictive biomarkers to make personalized medicine a reality. Dr. McShane received her B.A. in mathematics from Millersville State College and her M.S. in statistics from University of Kentucky. In 1989, she graduated with a Ph.D. in statistics from Cornell University.

F. Javier Nieto is Chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin (UW), where he has been since 2002. Prior to this appointment, he was on faculty in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and has served as a member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Epidemiology. Dr. Nieto’s main areas of research interest include cardiovascular disease epidemiology, markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, emerging risk factors for cardiovascular disease (homocysteine, inflammation markers, chronic infections), health consequences of sleep disorders, and psychosocial stress. He is also interested in methodological issues in survey research and epidemiology and in the teaching of epidemiologic methods. He is the director of the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin and has served on the IOM Committee on the Development of a Consensus Case Definition for Chronic Multisymptom Illness in 1990–1991 Gulf War Veterans. Dr. Nieto received his M.D. from the University of Valencia, Spain, and completed a residency in family and community medicine in Spain and an M.P.H. degree in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×

Havana, Cuba. He earned an M.H.S. in 1989 and a Ph.D. in epidemiology in 1991 from Johns Hopkins University.

Michael A. Stoto is a Professor of Health Systems Administration and Population Health at Georgetown University. A statistician, epidemiologist, and health policy analyst, Dr. Stoto’s research includes methodological topics in epidemiology, statistics, and demography; research synthesis/meta-analysis and other analytical methods related to comparative effectiveness research; community health assessment; risk analysis and communication; and performance measurement. His research interests include public health practice, especially with regard to emergency preparedness; drug and vaccine safety; infectious disease policy; and ethical issues in research and public health practice. Dr. Stoto is the co–Principal Investigator of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded Linking Assessment and Measurement to PHEP Systems Improvement (LAMPS) center based at the Harvard School of Public Health, and the director of the LAMPS Systems Improvement project, which seeks to adopt systems for improving public health emergency preparedness. He serves as a consultant to AcademyHealth’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality–funded Electronic Data Methods Forum, and is the oversight liaison director for Education, Training and Professional Development of the Food and Drug Administration/Georgetown Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (CERSI). Dr. Stoto is also an Adjunct Professor of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health and an adjunct faculty member of the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. He previously served on the faculty of Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, and the RAND Graduate School. From 1987 to 1998 he was a professional staff member at the IOM, where he served as director of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Dr. Stoto is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association.

Linda D. Youngman is the Branch Chief for Community Grants and Program Development at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, which is a section of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Previously she was a specialist in human clinical trials at the HHS Office of Research Integrity, and also served as a toxicologist and risk analyst in the Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation, Center for Veterinary Medicine at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At FDA, Dr. Youngman previously served as the Deputy Director, Acting Director, and Director of the Office of Research and chairperson of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. From 1990 to 2000, she was Director of Laboratories and Senior Research Fellow in the Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiological Studies unit at the University of Oxford, England, where she received tenure in 1995. Dr. Youngman received her Ph.D. in toxicology and her M.S. and B.S. in biochemistry from Cornell University. She also holds a certificate in epidemiology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×

and medical statistics from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a certificate in risk assessment from the University of Maryland. Her research has been published in numerous journals, including New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, British Medical Journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Cancer Research, and the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20219.
×
Page 104
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The Air Force Health Study (AFHS) is a longitudinal, prospective epidemiologic study of more than 2,700 men followed for approximately 20 years. This cohort participated in up to six intensive physical examinations with high rates of compliance. In addition to a complete record of clinical measurements and observations collected at these exams, serum and other biological samples were obtained and preserved. Extensive questionnaires addressing health, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status were administered during each exam, and other information was obtained about the participants' employment, families and offspring, and potential sources of environmental exposures. While the study was completed in 2006, the extensive health data linked to several types of longitudinally collected biologic specimens - some 91,000 serum, whole blood, urine, semen, and adipose tissue specimens - remain a resource for additional research. The AFHS assets are exceptional in the sheer multitude and range of types of information available for each participant. The longitudinal nature of the AFHS - with its extended follow-up, high rates of retention, and repeat biological samples - provides a valuable opportunity for research beyond the original aims of the study. Currently, the Institute of Medicine is the custodian of these assets.

The Air Force Health Study Assets Research Program outlines the feasibility and advisability of maintaining the biospecimens based on interest generated from the general scientific community and results of pilot projects and other research projects using the AFHS assets. According to this report, sustaining access to the AFHS biospecimens and data benefits the veterans community and the public at large, who will gain from the information derived from studies of the assets. . This report discusses the scientific value of the AFHS data and biospecimens and the lessons learned in managing access to the assets.

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