National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Hawaiian Crow (1992)

Chapter: BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

« Previous: APPENDIX B
Suggested Citation:"BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS." National Research Council. 1992. The Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Hawaiian Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2023.
×

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS

W. Donald Duckworth is president and director of the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii. Trained in systematic entomology, his research has focused on lepidoptera in the tropics.

Tom J. Cade is professor emeritus in the Section of Ecology and Systematics, Cornell University and professor and director of raptor research at Boise State University, Idaho. He is the founding chairman of The Peregrine Fund, Inc. Much of his research has dealt with falcons and other birds of prey.

Hampton L. Carson is professor emeritus in the Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu. His research career has been devoted to field and laboratory analyses of the genetic changes that occur in natural populations of both continental and insular species.

Scott R. Derrickson is curator of ornithology and deputy associate director for conservation of the Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological park. His research has focused primarily on endangered-species propagation and reintroduction.

John W. Fitzpatrick is executive director and senior research biologist at Archbold Biological Station, Lake Placid, Florida. His research includes ecology and population biology of the Florida Scrub Jay, community ecology of tropical forest birds, and the role of cattle ranches as wildlife habitat.

Frances C. James is in the Department of Biological Science at Florida State University. Her research emphasizes avian ecology, biogeography, and conservation. She is a past member of the Board of Directors of the World Wildlife Fund and president of the American Ornithologists' Union.

Special Advisors

Cynthia Kuehler is the curator of zoology for the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Wild Animal Park. Her research deals with developing techniques for propagation of endangered animals in captivity.

Stuart Pimm is in the Department of Zoology and Graduate Program in Ecology at the University of Tennesse at Knoxville. His research deals with issues of conservation biology.

Suggested Citation:"BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENTS." National Research Council. 1992. The Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Hawaiian Crow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2023.
×
Page 136
The Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Hawaiian Crow Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $50.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The Hawaiian Crow, or 'Alala, once an inhabitant of large forested areas of Hawaii, is now found only in the wild in a relatively small area of the central Kona coast. The decline of the 'Alala is part of a larger phenomenon of reduction and extinction of forest birds throughout Polynesia that has been associated with human colonization. It is a symptom of underlying ecological problems.

In this book, a committee of experts in ornithology, captive propagation, conservation biology, population genetics, and ecology analyzes existing data about the 'Alala and details its findings, conclusions, and recommendations concerning recovery efforts for this endangered bird.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!