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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

Index

A

Absenteeism, 8

asthma, 6, 61

Acaricides, 96, 225

Acid anhydrides, 121

trimetallic anhydride, 117-123 passim

Acoustic rhinometry, 182

Acute respiratory illnesses, 83

Adverse reactions, 131

to skin tests, 11, 162, 164

African Americans

asthma prevalence, 2, 34, 44, 61, 65, 70

child sensitization, 47

Age and age differences

asthma, 59, 61, 69

dermatitis, 73

rhinitis, 72

sensitization, 47

sinusitis, 79

skin test reactivity, 163

see also Children

Air cleaning devices, 32, 116, 189, 225-226, 231

Air conditioning, see HVAC systems

Algae, 114

Allergen-free products, 24, 98

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), 7, 74, 110-111

Allergy shots, see Immunotherapy

Alternaria, 67, 68, 111

Altitude, and dust mites, 50, 51, 88

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards, 19, 210-211, 215, 219, 228, 229, 230

Anaphylaxis, 131

and latex, 127, 128

Animals, 99, 104-105

see also Birds;

Cat dander;

Dogs;

Pets;

Rodents

Antibiotics, 119, 121

Antibodies, see Immunoglobulin; In vitro antibody tests

Antigen-presenting cells (APC), 135-137

Antihistamines, 10

and skin test reactivity, 163

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

Arthropoda, see Cockroaches;

Dust mites

Asian Americans, asthma prevalence, 70

Aspergillus fungi, 74, 75, 109, 110-111

Assessment, see Diagnosis;

Exposure assessment;

Risk assessment;

Tests and testing methods

Asthma, 6-7, 34, 57, 132, 147

allergen evaluation and control, 16, 19-20, 97-98

and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 74

and animals, 9, 25, 36, 37, 107

and Aspergillus fumigatus, 67

attributable fractions, 59, 62-63

and bacteria, 113

and birds, 105

and bronchitis, 59, 69, 79-80

and cat dander, 68, 69, 93, 100

and chemical allergens, 27, 117, 119, 121-122, 123

and children, 6, 59, 61, 64, 67, 68, 69, 70

and cockroaches, 9, 47, 69, 92

costs, 7, 22, 34-35, 61, 84

deaths, 6, 8, 34, 64, 65-67, 70

diagnosis of, 12, 15, 16, 18, 30, 57-58, 166, 167, 175, 178, 180

and dust mites, 9, 16, 36, 67, 68, 88, 93, 199-200

epidemiological studies, 58-59

and fungi, 9, 67, 68, 74, 111, 117

and grasses, 68

historical studies, 37

hospitalization, 8, 34, 61, 64-65, 66, 68, 69

and microbes, 114

and monkeys, 105

patient education and management, 15, 19-20, 178, 233-240, 242-244

prevalence, 6, 7, 22, 34, 55, 60-61, 62-67

and quality of life, 58

and smoking, 59

Asymptomatic atopy, 42

Atopic dermatitis, 73

Atopy, 3, 42, 56

and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 81

Attributable fractions, 59-60

asthma, 59, 62-63

Aureobasidium, 75, 77

Australasia, asthma deaths, 64

Avoidance measures, see Control measures

Azo-dyes, 121

B

Bacteria, 29, 112-114, 213

Bedding, 24, 98

and dust mites, 9, 10, 16, 95-96

feathers in, 105

Behavior modification, see Education, of patients

Benefits systems, disability assessment, 17-18

Biocides, 115, 218, 225

Birds, 24-26, 105-106

and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75, 105-106

B lymphocytes, 141-142

Body plethysmography, 12

Briançon, France, 50, 51

Britain

asthma, 64

and humidifier fever, 78

sinusitis, 78

Bronchial hyperreactivity, 30-31, 57, 67, 68, 184

testing of, 179-180

Bronchiolitis, 69

Bronchitis, 3, 79-81, 83

and asthma, 59, 69, 79-80

Bronchoalveolar lavage, 181

Bronchoprovocation testing, 17, 180-181, 183

Bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, see Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

Building-related illness (BRI), 81-83, 206-207

Buildings, see Building-related illness;

Engineering control;

HVAC

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

systems;

Maintenance of buildings;

Sick building syndrome

C

Carpeting, 19, 24, 38, 213-214, 223, 230

and cat dander, 101

and dust mites, 10, 16, 95, 96

and rhinitis, 37

Case control studies, 59

Cat dander, 9, 99-102

and HVAC filters, 14

lions and tigers, 105

reagents for, 11, 25, 100, 106

Cattle, 104-105

CD4+ cells, 136, 139, 147

Cell-mediated immunity, 132

and dermatitis, 73

and fungi, 26-27

testing of, 12, 53, 166, 168

Cellular processes and mechanisms, 135-144

Central heating, see Heating;

HVAC systems

Chemical allergens, 9, 27-28, 117-125

exposure assessment, 32

and in vitro testing, 30

multiple chemical sensitivity, 43

and rhinitis, 27, 119, 121

sensitization to, 27, 28, 53, 122-123

Chicago, asthma, 70

Children, 44, 47, 56, 57, 98

asthma education, 233-236

asthma onset, 67, 68

asthma prevalence, 6, 59, 61, 64, 69, 70

bronchial hyperreactivity, 180

bronchitis, 59

dermatitis, 73

dust mite sensitization, 50, 51

rhinitis, 72

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 79-81

Classification of reactions, 3, 39, 40, 132

Cockroaches, 9, 91-92

Colds, 83

Competing risks, 59-60

Condensation, 211-212, 227

Conjunctivitis, 3, 132

and chemical allergens, 13, 119, 121

Construction materials, 214

Contact dermatitis, 73-74

Control measures

cat dander, 101-102

for dust mites, 9, 10, 24, 94-96, 225-226, 236-238

efficacy assessment, 17-18, 24, 44, 98

fungal and microbial infestation, 97, 114-116

household, 7, 9, 10, 98

insects, 96-97

pets and animals, 26, 96, 104, 107

pollen, 97

and quality of life, 24, 98-99

research needs, 23-24, 98

see also Education;

Engineering control;

Therapeutic interventions

Costs

analyses, 15-16, 84

asthma cases, 7, 22, 34-35, 61, 84

Cotton dust standard, 176

Cromolyn, 10

Cross-reactivity, 11, 30, 31, 91, 166, 169-170

Cultural environment

and allergy prevalence, 22, 84

and asthma, 70

Cumulative exposure, 13

Cystic fibrosis

and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 74

Cytokines, 147, 149-150, 168

D

Daily diaries, 159-160

Dander, see Cat dander

Deaths, asthma, 6, 8, 34, 64, 65-67, 70

Deer, 105

Definition of allergy, 39

Dehumidifiers, 212, 227

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

Delayed-type hypersensitivity, see Cell-mediated immunity

Dermatitis, 55, 72-74, 88

Dermatophagoides mites, 89-91

Detergents

and bacteria, 113

and dust mites, 16, 97

Development of allergies, see Genetic factors; Sensitization

Diagnosis, 10-11, 16-18

allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 74

dermatitis, 73-74

of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75

of rhinitis, 71-72, 166, 180

use of daily diaries, 159-160

use of physical examinations, 159

see also Asthma, diagnosis of;

In vitro antibody tests;

Medical history;

Pulmonary function tests;

Skin tests;

Tests and testing methods

Diesel fumes, 53

Diffusing-capacity testing, 12, 181-182

Disability assessment, using pulmonary function tests, 17-18

Dogs, 25, 102, 106

Double-immuno-diffusion testing, 11-12

Drugs, 10

Duct work, 207, 219-220

cleaning, 32-33, 116, 225, 231

Dust, 86-88

and asthma, 67, 88

in HVAC systems, 217-218

and rhinitis, 37, 72, 88

sampling of, 188-189, 195

Dust mites, 9, 87-88, 89-91

and birds, 105

and building climate, 10, 14, 16, 38, 88, 89, 96, 210-211

control measures, 9, 10, 24, 94-96, 225-226, 236-238

exposure and sensitization, 13, 31, 50, 51, 52, 93

research needs, 16

standardized reagents for, 111

E

Economic impacts of allergy, 7-8, 15-16, 23-24, 84-85

asthma, 6, 61

Eczema, see Dermatitis

Education

building engineers and management, 21, 244-245

of medical personnel, 15, 20-21, 240-243, 244

of patients, 15, 19-20, 44, 233-244

Electronics industry, 118-119

Electrostatic precipitation, 116

Elk, 105

Emergency medical service

asthma, 6, 7, 61

Emphysema, 79-81

Endotoxins, 29, 88

Energy efficiency, and building design, 37-38

Engineering control, 13, 18-19, 32-33, 206-209, 227-232

air cleaning, 225-226

and allergy education, 21

building design, 37-38, 207-208, 210-214

remediation, 224-227

see also HVAC systems;

Maintenance of buildings

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 11, 167

Eosinophils, 143

Epidemiological studies, 44

acute respiratory illnesses, 83

asthma, 58-59

atopy, 42

recommendations for, 83-85

rhinitis, 71-72

sensitization, 23, 46-47, 48-49, 51, 84-85

sinusitis, 78

use of pulmonary function tests, 17, 18, 183-184

use of skin tests, 11, 47

see also Attributable fractions;

Risk assessment

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

Epithelium, 134, 146

Epoxy resins, 121

Ethnic groups, see African Americans;

Mexican Americans;

Race and ethnicity

Ethylenediamine, 121

Exercise testing, 12, 179, 182

Exposure assessment, 13, 18, 185-187

personal doses, 194-196

research needs, 18, 23, 31-32, 204-205

sample analysis, 191-193

sample collection, 31-32, 94, 187-191, 204-205

Exposure levels, relation to sensitization, 5-6, 13, 23, 38, 50, 51, 93-94

Extracts, see Reagents and extracts

Eye irritation, 83

F

Farms and farmers

animal allergens, 104-105

''farmer's lung," 75, 76

Feathers, see Birds

Fibrosis, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75

Ficus benjamina, 126

Field testing of control measures, 24

Filtration, see HVAC systems

Flooring, 214

Food allergies, 37

Food and Drug Administration, 169

Formaldehyde, 121-122

Fungi, 9, 11, 108-111

Aspergillus, 74, 75, 109, 110-111

and asthma, 9, 67, 68, 74, 111, 117

and building climate, 211

and carpeting, 213

research needs, 26-27, 29, 116-117

and rhinitis, 9, 72

sampling, 190, 192

see also HVAC systems, fungal and microbial infestation

G

Gas dilution, 12

Gender differences

asthma, 69

sensitization, 47

Genetic factors, 2-4, 29, 42, 151-152

asthma, 67

and childhood onset, 50, 56, 57

dermatitis, 73

Geographic location, 83-84

and asthma, 68-69

see also Inner-city areas

Grasses, 72, 97

Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma, 15, 241, 243

Guinea pigs, 103, 104

H

Hamsters, 104

Haptens, 119

Hay fever, see Rhinitis

Health care facilities, 7, 65, 66

HVAC standards, 215

worker allergen exposure, 119, 128, 129

Heating, 37-38

see also HVAC systems

Heredity, see Genetic factors

Histamine, 3, 39, 42, 57, 179, 180

History of allergy, 37, 38

Horses, 105

Hospitalization

for asthma, 8, 34, 61, 64-65, 66, 68, 69

for hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75

Hours spent indoors, 2, 34

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 139

Humidifiers, 109, 112, 115, 207, 212, 218-219

"humidifier fever," 77-78, 113, 114

Humidity, 24, 38

control, 19, 115, 210-211, 222, 227

and dust mites, 10, 16, 88, 89, 96

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning) systems, 13-14, 18-19, 21, 32-33, 38, 207, 214-222, 229

and animal allergens, 25, 107

bird dropping contamination, 106

fungal and microbial infestation, 14, 109, 113, 115-116, 216

and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75, 77

improvement guidelines, 19, 230

maintenance of, 38, 207, 222, 224

in residential buildings, 228-229

Hypersensitivity, 3, 131-132

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 7, 12, 39, 55, 75-77

and bacteria, 113

and birds, 26

and chemical allergens, 119, 121

and fungi, 9, 26-27, 110, 117

testing of, 12, 166, 167, 170, 173, 175, 181

and thermophilic actinomycetes, 75, 77, 218

I

Identification of allergens, see Risk assessment;

Tests and testing methods

Immunoglobulin E (IgE), 3, 39, 41-42, 142

and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 74

and dermatitis, 73

and dust mites, 88

and fungi, 11, 111, 117

in vitro testing, 11, 166-167

reaction to smoke, 52-53

and rhinitis, 71

and skin tests, 46, 160-161

Immunoglobulin G (IgG)

and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 74

and fungi, 110-111

and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 39, 53, 75, 77

testing of, 11-12, 53, 114, 167, 193

Immunologic hemorrhagic pneumonitis

and chemical allergens, 27, 119, 121, 124

Immunologic tests, see In vitro antibody tests;

Laboratory studies;

Reagents and extracts;

Skin tests

Immunotherapy (allergy shots), 10

Impingers, 191

Incidence of allergies, 44, 84

allergic rhinitis, 71

asthma, 61

atopic dermatitis, 73

Industrial chemicals, see Chemical allergens

Infant eczema, 73

Inflammatory-response agents, 3, 144-146

Influenza, 83

Inner-city areas, 25, 88, 92, 104, 107

and asthma, 9, 47, 69, 70, 92

Insects, 91-92, 96-97

see also Cockroaches

Insulation, 38, 221-222

Insurance systems, disability assessment for, 17-18

International Union of Immunologic Societies (IUIS), 169

Intervention, see Control measures;

Education;

Therapeutic interventions

Intradermal testing, see Skin tests

In vitro antibody tests, 11-12, 30, 161, 166-171

In vivo testing, see Skin tests

Irritating substances, and allergy development, 46

Isocyanates, 121

toluene diisocyanate, 117, 118, 119, 122

J

Japan

hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 77

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

K

King Menes, 37

L

Laboratory studies, 11

see also In vitro antibody tests;

Skin tests

Laboratory workers, rodent exposure, 99, 102-103, 104

Lacquer, 121

Late respiratory systemic syndrome (LRSS), and chemical allergens, 27, 119, 124

Latex, 28-29, 127-129

Legionella pneumophila, 113

Local allergens, 83-84

Local host factors, 29, 151-152

Low-molecular-weight (LMW) chemicals, see Chemical allergens

Lung volume measurement, 12, 181

Lymphocyte transformation assay, 12, 168

M

Macrophages, 135, 136, 137, 138, 150-151

Maintenance of buildings, 33, 222-224

and allergy education, 21

Mammals, see Cat dander;

Dogs;

Pets;

Rodents

Mast cells, 3, 39, 41-42, 134, 142-143

Mattresses9, 10

Mediators, 144-146, 168

Medical devices, latex, 129

Medical history, 10-11, 29, 153-159

Medical personnel

allergen exposure, 119, 128, 129

education of, 15, 20-21, 240-243, 244

Metals, 121

Methacholine, 57, 179, 180

Mexican Americans, 70

Mice, 103-104

Microbes, 108, 114-115, 214

and building climate, 38, 210-211

and humidifier fever, 77-78

see also Bacteria;

Fungi;

HVAC systems, fungal and microbial infestation

Middle Ages, 38

Mites, see Dust mites

Moisture control, 33, 210-213

Mold, see Fungi

Monitoring, see Exposure assessment

Mucus, 146

Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), 43

Multiple exposure sources, see Competing risks

N

Nasal effects, see Rhinitis

Nasal lavage, 183

National Center for Health Statistics, asthma survey coding, 65

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 177

Native Americans, asthma prevalence, 67, 70

Neutrophils, 143-144

New York City, asthma, 70

New Zealand, asthma deaths, 64

Nitrogen dioxide, 53

Non-IgE-mediated isocyanate asthma, and chemical allergens, 27, 124

No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL), 198-199

Nordic Committee on Building Regulations, 219

O

Occupational risks, see Farms and farmers;

Health care facilities;

Laboratory workers;

Workplaces

Offices, see Workplaces

Ouchterlony test, 11-12, 167

Outpatient care, asthma, 61

Ozone, 53

and asthma, 70-71

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

P

Peak-flow measurements, 12, 18, 177-179, 184

Permissible exposure limits (PELs), 122

Pets, 9, 38, 99

see also Cat dander;

Dogs

Pharmaceutical workers, 119

Physical examinations, 159

Pigeons, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75, 105-106

Plants and plant products, 28-29, 125-130

see also Grasses;

Pollen

Plating facilities, 121

Platinum, 53, 117, 118, 121

Pneumonia, 83

Pneumonitis, see Hypersensitivity pneumonitis;

Immunologic hemorrhagic pneumonitis

Pollen, 125-126, 127

and asthma, 58, 68

and carpeting, 19

historical studies, 37

and HVAC filters, 14, 216, 229

Pollution and pollutants, 35, 38, 53

and asthma, 70-71

Population studies, see Epidemiological studies

Poverty, and asthma, 70

Precipitin assays, 11-12, 114, 167, 170

Prevalence of allergies, 5, 39, 44

allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, 55, 74

asthma, 6, 7, 22, 34, 55, 60-61, 62-67

bronchitis, 59

cat dander, 99

chemical exposure, 28

dermatitis, 55, 73, 74

estimation methods, 11, 22, 55, 84

hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 55

rhinitis, 5, 35, 55, 71

sensitization, 36, 39, 46-47

sinusitis, 55, 78-79

and socioeconomic status, 22, 70, 71,

work settings, 53

see also Attributable fractions;

Epidemiological studies

Primates, 105

Protozoa, 114

Psyllium, 127

Pulmonary disease anemia (PDA), 119

Pulmonary function tests, 12, 17-18, 30-31, 171-184

Q

Quality of life

and asthma, 34

impacts of control measures, 24, 98-99

R

Rabbits, 103, 104

Race and ethnicity, 84

asthma prevalence, 6, 22, 34, 61, 70

child sensitization, 47

see also African Americans

Radioallergosorbent test (RAST), 11, 165, 166-167

Rats, 103

Reagents and extracts

for animal sources, 11, 24-25, 100, 106

for fungi, 11, 111

for in vitro antibody tests, 12, 30, 168-169, 171

for skin tests, 11, 30, 163-164

Regional allergens, 83-84

Relapse prevention, 20

Research assays, 12

Reservoir sampling, 31-32, 94, 188-189, 193

Respiratory effects

adjuvant, 150-151

allergen-specific, 147-150

immune and inflammatory cells, 135-144

nonspecific defense mechanisms, 146

structural tissue and cells, 133-135

see also Acute respiratory illnesses;

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis;

Asthma;

Bronchitis;

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis;

Immunologic hemorrhagic pneumonitis;

Late respiratory systemic syndrome;

Pulmonary function tests;

Rhinitis

Rhinitis (hay fever), 3, 5, 35, 71, 83, 132

and animals, 9, 105

and chemical allergens, 27, 119, 121

and cockroaches, 9

and dust, 37, 72, 88

and fungi, 9, 72

and grasses, 72

historical studies, 37

testing of, 71-72, 166, 180

Rhinomanometry, 12, 182

Risk assessment, 13, 38, 47, 50, 196-206

allergen identification, 23, 27, 83-84, 85

chemical allergens, 27, 122-123, 124

Rodents, 25, 102-104

Rotorods, 190-191

Rubber, see Latex

S

Sampling

analysis, 191-193

collection, 31-32, 94, 187-191, 204-205

Sauna takers disease, 77

Scratch tests, 162

Seasonal variations, 198

asthma, 68

hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 77

sensitization, 47

Sensitization, 3-5, 22-23, 29, 39, 41-42, 84-85

chemical allergens, 27, 28, 53, 122-123

and cross-reactivity, 11, 30

epidemiological studies, 23, 46-47, 48-49, 51, 84-85

prevalence, 36, 39, 46-47

prevention of, 21, 24, 26

relation to exposure levels, 5-6, 13, 23, 38, 50, 51, 93-94

testing of, 17, 45-47, 53, 201-204

and tobacco smoke, 52-53

Serial pulmonary function testing, 17, 183

Serum antibody tests, 166-167

Severity measures, 44-45

Shellac, 121

Shots, see Immunotherapy

Sick building syndrome (SBS), 81, 206-207

Sinusitis, 55, 78-79

Skin reaction, 149

see also Dermatitis;

Skin tests;

Urticaria

Skin tests, 11, 16-17, 29-30, 46-47, 160-166, 170

adverse reactions to, 11, 162, 164

smoking and reactivity, 52-53

use of house dust, 87

Slime molds, 114

Smoke and smoking, 52-53

bronchial hyperreactivity, 180

and bronchitis, 59, 69, 79

and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 81

Socioeconomic status

and allergy prevalence, 22, 70, 71, 84

and patient education, 20, 235-236

Sources of allergens, see Cat dander;

Chemical allergens;

Cockroaches;

Dust mites;

Exposure assessment;

Fungi;

Humidifiers;

HVAC systems;

Pets;

Risk assessment;

Rodents

Southern Building Code Congress International, 215

Spina bifida, and latex allergy, 128

Spirometry, 12, 17, 173-177, 183

Spores, see Fungi;

Slime molds

Standards and standardization

asthma survey coding, 65

chemical exposure levels, 122, 125

HVAC systems, 19, 33, 210-211, 215, 219, 228, 229, 230

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
×

medical history data, 29, 157, 159

pulmonary function tests, 176-177, 178

reagents, 11, 12, 30, 165, 168-169

sampling and exposure assessment, 31-32, 204-205

skin test methods, 17

Steroids, 10, 74, 146, 163

Sulfur dioxide, 53

Surveys, see Epidemiological studies

Swine, 105

Symptoms, 3

relation to exposure levels, 13

T

Tannic acid, 96

Temperature, 16, 97, 210-211

Tests and testing methods

control measures efficacy, 17-18, 24, 44, 98

dust mite allergens, 89, 91, 93

environmental, 12-13

house dust allergens, 91, 92-93, 94

sensitization, 17, 45-47, 53, 201-204

see also Exposure assessment;

In vitro antibody tests;

Pulmonary function tests;

Skin tests

T helper lymphocytes and receptors, 135-141 passim, 147, 149

and asthma, 166

Therapeutic interventions

for asthma, 97-98

for dermatitis, 74

efficacy assessment, 17, 18, 44, 184

hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75

Thermophilic actinomycetes, 114

and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 75, 77, 218

Threshold limits, 122, 125, 198-199

Tobacco smoke, see Smoke and smoking

Toluene diisocyanate (TDI), 117, 118, 119, 122

Trimetallic anhydride (TMA), 117-123 passim

U

Upholstery, 24, 98

and dust mites, 9, 10

Urban-rural differences

asthma, 68-69

Urticaria

and latex, 127, 128

V

Vacuuming, 32, 38, 223, 230-231

and dust mite control, 10

Vapor retarders, 212

Ventilation, 13-14, 16, 19, 35, 38, 97

and animal allergens, 25

and moisture control, 33

see also HVAC systems

Veterinarians, 105

W

Water damage, 19, 212, 227

carpeting, 213-214

Wheezing, 69, 83

Workplaces, 9, 28, 54-55, 119-125 passim, 229

animals in, 99

and bacteria, 113

and humidifier fever, 77-78

and hypersensitivity pneumonitis, 77, 119

plants in, 28, 126, 129

sensitization prevalence, 53

see also Building-related illness;

Farms and farmers;

Health care facilities;

Laboratory workers;

Sick building syndrome

Z

Zoos, 105

Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1993. Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2056.
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Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects Get This Book
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More than 50 million Americans, one out of five, suffer from hay fever, asthma, and other allergic diseases. Many of these conditions are caused by exposure to allergens in indoor environments such as the house, work, and school--where we spend as much as 98 percent of our time.

Developed by medical, public health, and engineering professionals working together, this unique volume summarizes what is known about indoor allergens, how they affect human health, the magnitude of their effect on various populations, and how they can be controlled. The book addresses controversies, recommends research directions, and suggests how to assist and educate allergy patients, as well as professionals.

Indoor Allergens presents a wealth of information about common indoor allergens and their varying effects, from significant hay fever to life-threatening asthma. The volume discusses sources of allergens, from fungi and dust mites to allergenic chemicals, plants, and animals, and examines practical measures for their control.

Indoor Allergens discusses how the human airway and immune system respond to inhaled allergens and assesses patient testing methods, covering the importance of the patient's medical history and outlining procedures and approaches to interpretation for skin tests, in vitro diagnostic tests, and tests of patients' pulmonary function.

This comprehensive and practical volume will be important to allergists and other health care providers; public health professionals; specialists in building design, construction, and maintenance; faculty and students in public health; and interested allergy patients.

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