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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite (1993)

Chapter: List of Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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List of Acronyms and Abbreviations


ADP

Adenine diphosphoribose

ANL

Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

APA

Aerican Psychiatric Association

ATP

Adenosine triphosphate


BAL

British Anti-Lewisite, an antidote for Lewisite


CAG

Carcinogen Assessment Group of the Environmental Protection Agency

CAS

Chemical Abstracts Service

CBW

Chemical and biological warfare

CDC

Centers for Disease Control

CMR

Committee on Medical Research

COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Ct

Concentration multiplied by time, used to determine cumulative exposure

CTGC

Committee on the Treatment of Gas Casualties

CWS

Chemical Warfare Service


DAV

Disabled American Veterans

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid

DoA

Department of the Army

DoD

Department of Defense


EPA

Environmental Protection Agency


FEV1

Forced expiratory volume in 1 second

FOIA

Freedom of Information Act

FVC

Forced vital capacity


HCN

Hydrogen cyanide

HD

Distilled sulfur mustard; bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide

Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×

HN2

Mechlorethamine, a nitrogen mustard

HN3

Tris(ß-chloroethyl) methylamine, a nitrogen mustard

hprt

Gene locus coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase

HS

Sulfur mustard (British acronym for agent HD); bis(2- chloroethyl) sulfide

HT

Impure mixture of distilled sulfur mustard, stabilizer compound, and sulfur impurities


IARC

International Agency for Research on Cancer

ICt50

Statistically estimated concentration over a period of time that would cause incapacitation to 50 percent of ex posed test subjects

IOM

Institute of Medicine

IP

Intraperitoneal

IV

Intravenous


LCt50

Statistically estimated concentration over a period of time that would be lethal to 50 percent of test subjects; median lethal count

LD50

Dose level that would be lethal to 50 percent of test subjects; median lethal dose


MEDLARS

Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System

MeSH

Medical Subject Headings

MSH

Melanocyte-stimulating hormone


NAD

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

NAS

National Academy of Sciences

NDRC

National Defense Research Committee

NLM

National Library of Medicine

NOEL

No observed effect level

NRC

National Research Council

NRL

Naval Research Laboratory

NTIS

National Technical Information Service

NTP

National Toxicology Program


OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OSRD

Office of Scientific Research and Development


PADPRP

Poly-(adenosine diphosphateribose) polymerase

PBB

Polybrominated biphenyl

PF

Protection factor

PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder


RADS

Reactive airways disfunction syndrome

RASH

Rapid screening of hazard

RNA

Ribonucleic acid


SCE

Sister chromatid exchange

SIPRI

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

SM

Sulfur mustard

Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×

SMR

Standardized mortality ratio


TD50

Statistically estimated dose that would produce a toxic effect in 50 percent of test subjects; median toxic dose

TDI

Toluene diisocyanate

TMI

Three Mile Island


USUHS

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

UV

Ultraviolet light

UVB

Region in the ultraviolet spectrum


VA

Department of Veterans Affairs


WHO

World Health Organization

WWI

World War I

WWII

World War II

Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
Page 417
Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
Page 418
Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
×
Page 419
Suggested Citation:"List of Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 1993. Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2058.
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Page 420
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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite Get This Book
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Recently, World War II veterans have come forward to claim compensation for health effects they say were caused by their participation in chemical warfare experiments.

In response, the Veterans Administration asked the Institute of Medicine to study the issue. Based on a literature review and personal testimony from more than 250 affected veterans, this new volume discusses in detail the development and chemistry of mustard agents and Lewisite followed by interesting and informative discussions about these substances and their possible connection to a range of health problems, from cancer to reproductive disorders.

The volume also offers an often chilling historical examination of the use of volunteers in chemical warfare experiments by the U.S. military--what the then-young soldiers were told prior to the experiments, how they were "encouraged" to remain in the program, and how they were treated afterward.

This comprehensive and controversial book will be of importance to policymakers and legislators, military and civilian planners, officials at the Department of Veterans Affairs, military historians, and researchers.

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