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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
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Appendix A

Breakout Group Tables

TABLE A-1 Vulnerable Communities Breakout Table

Component Objectives Measures/indicators Resilience Goals
Communication Measure number of people in community with special communication needs

Identify mechanisms to address communication needs with those who have limited ability to understand information

Identify resources to help those in the community
Measure how many people in the community:

Non-English
Deaf/Hearing Impaired
Vision Impaired
Illiterate
Limited English
Proficiency
Undocumented/Documented Immigrants
Tourists
University Students
Develop flexibility in communication systems to deal with uncertain events

Have alternative means of communication/ redundancy in systems to provide vulnerable populations information in case main systems are down

Develop a network of translators who can reach out to people with special communication needs

Implement training for organizations/community groups to address special communication needs
Other Components:
Medical
Independence/Mobility
Supervision/Self-determination
Transportation
Social Networks/Connections
Resources/Empowered
     
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×

TABLE A-2 Critical and Environmental Infrastructure Breakout Table

Component Objectives Measures/Indicators Incentives
Water Availability

Quality

Containment

Inventory

Energy Reliability

Recovery

Reduced Env. Impact

Accessibility

Independence

Transportation Mobility

Accessibility

Evacuation

Reliability

Communication Mass communication

Person to person

Emergency/911 functions/responder

Commercial activity

Environment Protection of community assets

Quality for human health and ecosystem health

Interdependence of regions

Quality of life

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×

TABLE A-3 Social Factors Breakout Table

Component Objectives Measures/Indicators Incentives
Leadership Identify who is listened to and speaks for community; credibility; capacity of leaders to connect to other leaders and networks; capacity to raise risk awareness
Social Connectedness/ Cohesiveness Relationships between and among businesses/organizations; institutional arrangements - formal and informal; capacity and effectiveness of communication
Resourcefulness Characterize workforce composition and distribution; identify key resources: healthcare, emergency services, private sector, retired people, unemployed – what is their resilience and vulnerability; minimize displacement
Interdependencies Scales - individual vs. neighborhood vs. regional; rural or urban. Conceptualize as network with nodes and links. Treat as a marker of strength. Analyze likelihood of business interruption
Cultural Diversity Culture of preparedness/self-reliance; income diversity; affordability; occupational diversity
Education and Schools Investigate role of schools in community – short term rallying points; long-term reasons to stay/return, livelihood advancement, skills development, understanding risk. Schools and education are separate concepts and same concept
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×

TABLE A-4 Built Environment Breakout Table

Component Objectives Measures/Indicators Incentives
Housing Robustness,
Resourcefulness,
Recovery, and
Redundancy
Presence of building codes for housing including rental properties; percentage building codes met; processes in place to bring housing up to code

Overall housing stock: manufactured, rental, owner; ability to enforce building codes; how much of housing stock participates in insurance

Baseline conditions for the housing stock; ratio of home renters to home owners; percentage of transient citizens
Grants and innovative taxpayer incentives for upgrades

Innovative permitting
Business Robustness,
Resourcefulness,
Recovery, and
Redundancy
Awareness: how aware is the business community of risks it faces for loss of business, property damage and disruption of services/revenue

Baseline conditions

Employee engagement

Number of local versus national or multinational businesses

Percentage of population employed by businesses

Percentage of businesses with continuity plan in place
Grants and innovative taxpayer incentives for upgrades

Innovative permitting
Community Facilities (e.g., schools, public administration) Robustness, Resourcefulness, Recovery, and Redundancy Baseline conditions of facility stock, housing code compliance Grants and innovative taxpayer incentives for upgrades

Innovative permitting
Health Care Facilities Robustness, Resourcefulness, Recovery, and Redundancy Health deserts Baseline conditions: continuity of operations; contingency plans; capacity for sheltering in place and critical health services; percentage of community that is retired
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Breakout Group Tables." National Research Council. 2015. Developing a Framework for Measuring Community Resilience: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/20672.
×
Page 30
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The 2012 National Research Council report Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative highlighted the challenges of increasing national resilience in the United States. One finding of the report was that "without numerical means of assessing resilience, it would be impossible to identify the priority needs for improvement, to monitor changes, to show that resilience had improved, or to compare the benefits of increasing resilience with the associated costs." Although measuring resilience is a challenge, metrics and indicators to evaluate progress, and the data necessary to establish the metric, are critical for helping communities to clarify and formalize what the concept of resilience means for them, and to support efforts to develop and prioritize resilience investments. One of the recommendations from the 2012 report stated that government entities at federal, state, and local levels and professional organizations should partner to help develop a framework for communities to adapt to their circumstances and begin to track their progress toward increasing resilience.

To build upon this recommendation and begin to help communities formulate such a framework, the Resilient America Roundtable of the National Academies convened the workshop Measures of Community Resilience: From Lessons Learned to Lessons Applied on September 5, 2014 in Washington, D.C. The workshop's overarching objective was to begin to develop a framework of measures and indicators that could support community efforts to increase their resilience. The framework will be further developed through feedback and testing in pilot and other partner communities that are working with the Resilient America Roundtable. This report is a summary of the one-day workshop, which consisted of a keynote address and two panel sessions in the morning and afternoon breakout sessions that began the discussion on how to develop a framework of resilience measures.

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