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China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC (1994)

Chapter: Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

APPENDIX D

General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from ''Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools (1986)"

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR DIRECT APPLICATION TO A CHINESE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY AS A SELF-SPONSORED STUDENT

Adapted from Study in China, The Chinese National Society of Universities and Colleges for Foreign Student Affairs, Beijing Language and Culture University Press, March 1993.

Categories of Foreign Students Eligible for Admission

A. Undergraduates: The applicant should be at least equivalent of a graduate of senior middle school (high school) in China. He/she should be 25 years of age or younger. The program lasts from four to six years.

B. Candidates for a Master's Degree: The applicant must come to China and pass the entrance exam for the master's program at the institution to which he/she is assigned. If the applicant has been graduated with honors from a Chinese institution of higher education and wishes to work for an advanced degree at the same school, he/she may, upon recommendation by his/her department, be approved for the degree program without examinations. The applicant should be 35 years of age or younger. The program lasts from two to three years.

C. Candidates for a Doctorate Degree: The applicant must be recommended by two of his/her professors and approved for the doctoral program by the institution to which he/she has been assigned. The

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

applicant should be 40 years of age or younger. The program lasts from two to three years.

D. General advanced students: The applicant should have completed at least two years of undergraduate studies in China or abroad, and should intend to continue studying in China a subject in which he/ she already has some background (except for those wishing to study elementary Chinese). The applicant should be 35 years of age or younger. The program lasts from one to two years.

E. Senior advanced students: The applicant should have at least the equivalent of the Chinese master's degree or be a candidate for a doctorate degree in another country. The student pursues advanced study independently under the direction of Chinese tutors. He/she should be 45 years of age or younger. The program generally lasts one year.

Application Procedures

Self-sponsored students who are not applying under an institution-to-institution agreement may send their applications directly to the university to which they are applying. Applicants should submit the following materials:

  1. Completed "Application Form for Foreigners Wishing to Study in China."

  2. Health Certificate, completed by a medical doctor after a physical examination of the applicant. The form should bear a seal of a clinic or a hospital. Those who fail to meet the health requirements will not be admitted to study in China. Anyone who fails to meet the requirements come to China will be asked to leave the country within a month at his/ her own expense.

  3. Duplicated copies of notarized diploma or certificate and school-certified transcript of complete academic records, in English or Chinese, or with a translation in English or Chinese.

  4. Master's and doctoral degree candidates must submit recommendation letters from at least two professors or associate professors (or people holding equivalent titles). Advanced students intending to pursue studies in the fine arts may be required to submit the following additional materials (check with institution):

    Art history: copy of an original term paper or other substantial piece of work on some aspect of art history;

    Graphic arts: three original pieces, or color photographs of six samples of the applicant's work;

    Music (performance): 30-minute tape recording of vocal or instrumental performance;

    Music (composition): copy of an original composition.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
  1. Undergraduates in fine arts may be required to submit the same material as above except that:

    • no letter of recommendation from teachers is required;

    • students of art history may submit a shorter criticism or commentary on some aspect of art history.

Application Deadlines

These may vary among institutions. In general, applications for fall term admission should be submitted between March 1 and May 31; applications for spring term admission should be submitted between October 1 and November 30.

Entrance Examinations

A. Undergraduates in liberal arts and general advanced students need not take entrance examinations. The admission decision will be based on the applicant's academic record. Undergraduates in the sciences, engineering, agriculture, and medicine are typically required to take standard examinations in basic mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Those intending to study management are required to take an examination in basic mathematics.

B. Candidates for graduate degrees must first come to China as advanced students. Candidates for master's degrees must take written examinations in subjects required by the school in question (except for foreign languages and political studies). Candidates for doctoral degrees will be examined orally by faculty members. Those who fail such examinations may nevertheless be permitted to stay on as advanced students at a level suited to their academic background. If they are recipients of Chinese government scholarships, the amount of their allowances will be reduced accordingly.

C. After enrollment, senior advanced students will be evaluated by their tutors on their subject knowledge. Those who do not meet the requirements must change their status to that of general advanced students. If they are recipients of Chinese government scholarships, the amount of their allowances will be reduced accordingly.

Elementary Chinese and Preparatory Courses

A. Students without adequate knowledge of Chinese are required to study the language and pass an examination in it before taking up their specialties. Undergraduates in Chinese language and literature, Chinese history, Chinese philosophy, history of Chinese art and Chinese medicine are required to take a two-year course in elementary Chinese. Undergraduates and advanced students in the sciences, engineering, or other specialties are required to take a one-year course in elementary Chinese.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

General advanced students studying liberal arts who have attained an adequate level of competence in Chinese may enter their schools directly. Supplementary language courses will be organized for them by their schools as necessary.

Senior advanced students studying liberal arts and candidates for advanced degrees should have attained a higher level of competence in Chinese and be able to use it in pursuing study and research in their special fields.

B. Students in mathematics, physics, and chemistry whose examination scores fall below the minimum requirements for admission may apply for a one year preparatory course in those subjects. Those who pass the final course examinations will be promoted to undergraduate classes; those who fail will be asked to withdraw.

The time spent in preparatory courses does not count toward the length of specialized studies.

Expenses Borne by Self-Supporting Students

A. Before coming to China, foreign students providing their own financial support must have a financial guarantor and must make sure that they have adequate resources to pay all expenses during the period of their studies here. All expenses must be paid in cash. School fees for tuition and housing are calculated in U.S. dollars and are to be paid after conversion into Foreign Exchange Certificates (FEC), according to the exchange rates of February 1 and September 1 of the year in which payments are made.*

  1. Tuition fees for one academic year are as follows:

Students in the liberal arts

  • Undergraduates and general advanced students:

US$1,500-3,000

  • Master's degree candidates:

US$2,000-3,500

  • Senior advanced students:

US$2,500-4,000

  • Doctoral degree candidates:

US$2,500-4,000

Students in the sciences, engineering, agriculture, medicine, sport, and fine arts

  • Undergraduates:

US$2,000-3,500

  • General advanced students:

US$2,000-3,500

  • Master's degree candidates:

US$2,500-4,000

  • Senior advanced students:

US$2,500-4,500

  • Doctoral degree candidates:

US$4,000-6,000

*  

Since the Chinese government stopped issuing FEC, many schools have requested payment in U.S. dollars.—Ed. Page 188

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
  1. Expenses for housing, teaching materials, and food are as follows. Housing expenses are US$2-3 per bed per day for a double room in the school dormitory, with two students sharing one room and using a common lavatory and bath. Teaching materials cost between US$30 and $50 per year for schools of liberal arts and are a bit higher for schools of science, engineering, agriculture, medicine, sport, and art. Food costs between US$40 and $60 per month in the foreign students' cafeteria, and between US$20 and $30 per month in the Chinese students' cafeteria.

  2. Students are responsible for the costs of board, medical care, textbooks, and class handouts. They are also responsible for expenses for additional laboratory work, field work, and field trips which are not related to the teaching program, as well as the other expenses for transfer from one school to another.

  3. Students who fall ill during their studies in China may consult doctors in the school clinics who will refer them to outside hospitals for treatment, if necessary.

C. Tuition is payable in two parts, half at the beginning of each term. Students who fail to pay tuition at the specified time will not be allowed to register. In special cases, a student may apply to the school authorities for permission to delay payment. However, payment may not be delayed beyond one month after the beginning of the term, and a penalty will be charged for late payment in the amount of five percent of the total tuition for one term.

Students who stay at school for more than one term but less than a full academic year pay tuition for the entire academic year.

If, before the end of the term, a student transfers to another school for reasons not the responsibility of the Chinese, he/she will receive no refund of tuition, and no payments may be transferred to the new school. The student must pay tuition to the new school.

Housing expenses are also to be paid at the beginning of each term. However, if this creates a hardship for a student, with the approval of the school authorities, he/she may make monthly payments instead.

Students who terminate or suspend their studies, or who withdraw from school before the end of a term, must pay housing expenses only for the number of days they have actually lived in the dormitory.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

The following sections are excerpted from "Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools (1986)," issued by the Bureau of Foreign Affairs of the State Education Commission of the PRC.

Academic Programs and Evaluations (Article VI)

A. All foreign students are expected to study hard, observe discipline and complete course work prescribed for them by their schools and teachers.

B. In principle, students are not permitted to transfer from one school to another, or to change either the subject or the duration of study that was agreed upon at the time of admission. In special cases, however, such changes may be approved by the Commission. For a change of subject, an application should be filed with the Commission before November 1 of the year in which the student is first enrolled, through the diplomatic mission or representative of the sponsoring organization in China of his/her country or through the sponsor in his/ her home country. For extension of duration of study, an application should be filed with the Commission before March 1 of the year when the student is due to leave.

C. Undergraduates should, in principle, follow the regular academic program established by the school. If necessary, the school authorities will make adjustments in the student's program. Candidates for advanced degrees should, in principle, follow the same program as the Chinese students. General advanced students should follow the program originally agreed to; no tutors are allocated to them. Senior advanced students mainly study independently, with periodic guidance from the tutors assigned to them.

D. Schools are responsible for arranging field trips, field work and laboratory work in accordance with the needs of the academic programs. Students must observe the relevant regulations when they need to use reference books, archives and other materials.

E. With the exception of senior advanced students, who will receive written evaluations of their work from their tutors, all other students will be evaluated on the basis of their class work and of examinations taken at the end of each term. The schools will commend or reward those who excel in their studies and so notify their sponsors, if any. The sponsors may ask the school authorities for academic records of the students they are sponsoring.

F. Undergraduates who, in one academic year, fail a total of three subjects or two major subjects after taking make-up examinations are

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

required to repeat the grade in question. They are allowed to repeat a grade no more than twice and to repeat the same grade only once.

Candidates for advanced degrees who fail in their examinations or thesis defense are allowed to extend the period of their studies in accordance with regulations formulated by the Chinese government.

General advanced students who fail in their final examinations for the academic year will be asked to withdraw from school. Schools using credit systems should follow relevant regulations.

Academic Degrees and Certificates (Article XI)

A. Undergraduates and candidates for a Master's degree who pass the examinations at the end of their studies will receive certificates and, in accordance with the Regulations of the People's Republic of China for Conferring Academic Degrees, the Bachelor's and Master's degrees respectively. Candidates for a Doctoral degree who pass the final examinations and the thesis defense will be awarded Doctoral degrees. Those who fail such examinations will receive certificates of completion of studies.

General advanced students and senior advanced students who have completed the required work will receive certificates of advanced study. No degrees will be conferred upon them.

B. Students who withdraw from school before completing their programs will be issued certificates indicating the period of time during which they have studied.

C. Foreign students should leave China within 15 days after their graduation or conclusion of studies.

Class Attendance, Suspension of Studies, Withdrawal from Studies, Disciplinary Action (Article VII)

A. Foreign students are expected to attend classes regularly and are not allowed to be absent without valid reasons. If they are ill or have a special need to be absent, they should ask for leave in accordance with the school regulations.

B. Foreign students should abide by the academic calendar of the school in which they are enrolled. Chinese schools do not observe the national holidays or other festivals of foreign countries. However, on such occasions a foreign student concerned may, on request, be granted a leave of absence. Foreign students must not ask for leave to travel as tourists while school is in session.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

C. A student who takes a leave of absence for more than two months at a time and cannot catch up with classes upon his/her return will be asked to suspend studies or to repeat the term. This must be done no later than the next academic year.

A student who is absent from class too often without valid reason will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the regulations of the school. In serious cases, he/she may be asked to withdraw from school.

A student who has an extended illness, or who is absent too often, or whose academic record is not satisfactory will be asked by the school authority to suspend study or to withdraw. The diplomatic mission and representative of the sponsoring organization in China of the student's country, or his/her sponsor at home, if any, will be notified of the action in writing.

If, for any reason, a foreign student wishes to suspend studies or to withdraw, or if the government or organizational sponsor decided to recall its students from China, the diplomatic mission in China of the student's country, or his/her organizational sponsor should submit a formal request to the Commission or to the school authorities.

D. A student who breaches the discipline of his/her school, damages public property, fights with others or behaves in other unacceptable ways will be subject to disciplinary action by the school authorities. According to the circumstances and gravity of the offense, the student will be given a warning, a serious warning, or a demerit recording, be placed on probation, asked to withdraw or be expelled from school.

If a student on one year probation has clearly improved his/her conduct during the probation period, the disciplinary action against him/ her may be rescinded. If a student fails to improve his/her conduct while on probation, he/she will be asked to withdraw from school.

When the school authorities take disciplinary action against a student, they will inform the student and also send written notification of the action to the diplomatic mission or representative of the sponsoring organization of the student's country in China, or to the student's sponsor at home.

Observance of Chinese Laws (Article VIII)

A. Foreign students must obey the laws and decrees of the Chinese government, abide by the rules and regulations of their schools and respect Chinese ways and customs.

B. Foreign students coming to study in China should have ordinary passports. Before starting school, bearers of diplomatic, service or special passports should go through certain special procedures at Chinese

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

public security departments and submit to them necessary documents issued by their countries' diplomatic missions or representatives of their sponsoring organization in China. Such students will not enjoy diplomatic or other privileges during their studies in China.

C. Within a short period of time after their arrival in China, foreign students must obtain residence permits from their local public security departments.

When a foreign student wishes to travel to other countries, tour the Hong Kong and Macao regions, or return home for any reason, the diplomatic mission or representative of the sponsoring organization of his/her country in China should give written notification to the school ten days in advance, if possible. With the approval of the school, the student should go to the local public security department to apply for the necessary exit and reentry visas.

When a foreign student wishes to visit an area of China to which foreigners may gain access only with permission, he/she must apply to the local public security department for a travel permit.

D. Foreign students must observe the Chinese customs regulations concerning materials to be taken out of China or mailed abroad. The following items are allowable: textbooks, class handouts and related materials issued to them by the school, study notes, photographs and audiovisual materials related to study. Any materials issued by the school which are not intended for outside circulation must be approved for exit by the school authorities, who will provide the student with an itemized certificate of authorization to present to the customs officer.

E. Foreign students who have violated Chinese laws and regulations, endangered China's national security, disturbed public order or harmed the interests of others will be punished by the Chinese public security and judicial departments according to law.

Extracurricular and Holiday Activities (Article X)

A. Foreign students may take part in the activities organized by the student association of their schools, as well as in the athletic and recreational activities of the Chinese students. They may join the various athletic and performing arts groups of their schools. They may also, if they wish, take part in activities organized by the Chinese to mark major holidays. Normal and friendly contacts between foreign students and Chinese teachers, students and people in general are encouraged.

B. If foreign students wish to organize activities in their school to celebrate their national days and major national festivals, they must

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×

obtain the approval of the school authorities. They must observe the rules and regulations of their schools in this connection.

C. Foreign students on Chinese government scholarships may join trips organized by schools during winter and summer vacations; every other year, the school will bear a portion of the expense for their travel and lodging. The schools will likewise pay parts of the expense for those scholarship students who are pursuing advanced studies for at least one academic year but less than two.

All self-supporting students and scholarship students who are pursuing advanced studies for less than one academic year may join these tours at their own expense.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 184
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 190
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 191
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 192
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: General Guidelines for Direct Application to a Chinese College or University as a Self-Sponsored Student and Excerpts from 'Regulations Concerning the Admission of Foreign Students in Chinese Schools'." National Academy of Sciences. 1994. China Bound, Revised: A Guide to Academic Life and Work in the PRC. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2111.
×
Page 193
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Being prepared in China, says one researcher, can mean "the difference between a headache and a productive day." Acclaimed by readers, this friendly and practical volume--now updated with important new information--offers all the details academic visitors need to make long-term stays in China productive, comfortable, and fun.

Academic opportunities have been revived in the years since the Tiananmen Square event, and the book opens with an overview of what we have learned from our academic exchanges with China, the opportunities now available, and resources for more information.

To help visitors prepare for daily life, the book covers everything from how to obtain the correct travel documents to what kinds of snack foods are available in China, from securing accommodations to having the proper gift for your Chinese dinner host.

Frank discussions on the research and academic environments in China will help students, investigators, and teachers from their initial assignment to a danwei, or work unit, to leaving the country with research materials intact. The book offers practical guidelines on working with Chinese academic institutions and research assistants, arranging work-related travel, managing working relationships, resolving language issues, and--perhaps most important--understanding Chinese attitudes and customs toward study, research, and work life.

New material in this edition includes an expanded section on science and social science field work, with a discussion of computers: which ones work best in China, how to arrange to bring your computer in, where to find parts and supplies, how to obtain repairs, and more. Living costs, health issues, and addresses and fax numbers for important services are updated. Guidance is offered on currency, transportation, communications, bringing children into China, and other issues.

Based on the first-hand reports of hundreds of academic visitors to China and original research by the authors, this book will be useful to anyone planning to live and work in China: students, researchers, and teachers and their visiting family members, as well as business professionals.

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