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Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality (1994)

Chapter: APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
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APPENDIX D
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

RICHARD B. JOHNSTON, JR. (Chair) is the Senior Vice President for Programs and Medical Director of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation in White Plains, New York, and Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. He received his undergraduate and medical education at Vanderbilt University and his postgraduate training at Children's Hospital, Boston, and Harvard Medical School. He was formerly chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, and at the University of Pennsylvania. He is board certified in pediatrics and serves as a clinical immunologist for children. His research interests include host defense mechanisms against infection and the biochemical basis for the killing of invading microorganisms by phagocytic cells. He presently chairs the Advisory Committee for Vaccines and Related Biological Products for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Johnston was also a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Adverse Consequences of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines.

E. RUSSELL ALEXANDER is Chief of Epidemiology at the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health and Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health and Community Medicine of the University of Washington. He received his undergraduate, M.D. degree, and pediatric training at the University of Chicago. He is certified

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×

by the American Board of Pediatrics, and his clinical Specialty is infectious diseases. He has been a member of the pediatric faculty of the universities of Chicago, Washington and Arizona, and Emory University. He is a former Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington. He holds membership in a number of professional societies and is a past President of the American Epidemiologic Society. He has been a recipient of several awards and has been a member of a number of committees and advisory panels.

ALAN M. ARON is the Director of Child Neurology and Professor of Neurology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He received his M.D. degree from Columbia University, New York, and did his undergraduate work at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Dr. Aron is board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, with special competence in child neurology. This specialization in child neurology led to numerous faculty and hospital appointments, memberships, and consultative positions. He holds membership in a number of professional societies and is a recipient of several awards.

ARTHUR K. ASBURY is the Van Meter Professor of Neurology and Vice Dean for Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Cincinnati and did his undergraduate work at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Asbury's specialization in neurology and neuropathology led to numerous faculty and hospital appointments, memberships, and consultative positions. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has received a number of awards, is past President of the American Neurological Association and the Association of University Professors of Neurology, and was Chief Editor of the Annals of Neurology.

CHARLES C. J. CARPENTER is Professor of Medicine at Brown University and Physician-in-Chief at the Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island. He received his M.D. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and did his undergraduate work at Princeton University. Dr. Carpenter is a member of the Institute of Medicine and numerous other professional societies; he is also a recipient of several academic honors and awards. He has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees; most recently he chaired the Committee on Malaria Prevention and Control.

K. LYNN CATES is Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Chief, Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. She received her M.D. degree from Northwestern University in Chicago and did her undergraduate work at Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. She did her pediatric internship and residency at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chi-

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×

cago and did a pediatric infectious diseases fellowship at the University of Minnesota Hospitals. She is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and is a member of many professional societies, including the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Society for Pediatric Research.

KAY DICKERSIN is Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. She received her Ph.D. degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and did undergraduate work at the University of California in Berkeley. Her major research interests are in clinical trials, meta-analysis, and publication bias. She is particularly interested in the development and utilization of methods for the evaluation of medical care and its effectiveness. Dr. Dickersin has memberships in several professional societies and is a recipient of a number of fellowships and awards. Dr. Dickersin has also served on the Institute of Medicine Committee to Advise the Department of Defense on its FY 1993 Breast Cancer Program and the Forum on Drug Development.

RICHARD T. JOHNSON is Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver. He is certified by the American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry and has held numerous faculty and hospital appointments and fellowships in his neurologic specialty. Dr. Johnson is a member of the Institute of Medicine as well as numerous other honorary and professional societies. He chaired the Institute of Medicine's Committee to Review an Epidemiologic Study of Neurologic Illness and Vaccination in Children. Dr. Johnson is a recipient of many awards and honors, lectures extensively, and is involved in numerous federal, nonfederal, editorial, and voluntary agencies and boards.

MICHAEL KATZ is Vice President for Research at the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation in White Plains, New York. He is also Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics, Emeritus, Columbia University, New York. Dr. Katz, a pediatrician, has a clinical specialty of infectious diseases and parasitology, and his research interests have dealt with host defense in malnourished children and mechanisms of latent virus infections. He is an author and coauthor of original scientific papers dealing with these subjects and, with two colleagues, an author of a textbook on parasitic diseases. Dr. Katz is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a number of professional societies, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a recipient of several awards, among them the Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, given by the German government. He has been a visiting professor in universities in the United States and abroad. He has been a consultant to the World Health Organization, the

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×

United Nation's Children's Fund, and various government organizations. Dr. Katz also served on the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Adverse Consequences of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines.

MICHAEL S. KRAMER is a Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He received his M.D. degree from Yale University School of Medicine. He is certified by the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Pediatrics, and he is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. He is a National Health Research Scientist of the National Health Research and Development Program, Health and Welfare, Canada, a member of numerous professional societies, and a recipient of many awards and honors.

KENNETH MCINTOSH is a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. He received his M.D. degree and did his undergraduate work at Harvard University. He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, is a recipient of several awards and honors, and is a member of many professional societies. His work in infectious diseases has led to numerous faculty and hospital appointments and consultancies.

CATHERINE J. ROSE is a board certified pediatrician in private practice in San Jose, California. She received her M.D. degree from West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown. She did her internship and pediatric residency at the University of California, San Diego. She was a fellow in general academic pediatrics at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. Following her fellowship, she was an associate in general pediatrics at Duke University. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

PENELOPE G. SHACKELFORD is Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. She received her M.D. degree from Washington University and did undergraduate work at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. She did her pediatric internship at Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, and her pediatric residency and fellowship in infectious diseases at St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri. She is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and is a member of several professional societies, including the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Association of Immunologists. Her research interest is the development of antibody responses in children.

PAUL D. STOLLEY is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. He received his M.D. degree from Cornell University Medical College, New York, and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×

University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is certified in public health by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Dr. Stolley is a member of the Institute of Medicine and several other professional societies, as well as a recipient of numerous awards and honors. Dr. Stolley also serves on the Institute of Medicine's Board on Health Sciences Policy.

STAFF

KATHLEEN R. STRATTON is a Senior Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. degree in natural sciences from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and received her Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. She did a postdoctoral research fellowship in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Other projects during her 3 years at the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine include work with the Committee to Study the Co-Administration of Research and Services at the National Institutes of Health and the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants, Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology, and the Committee on Neurotoxicology and Models for Assessing Risks.

CYNTHIA JOHNSON HOWE is a Program Officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. She received a B.A. degree in psychology from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, and has done graduate work in experimental psychology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Other projects during 12 years at the Institute of Medicine include a review of the adverse consequences of pertussis and rubella vaccines; an evaluation of poliomyelitis vaccine policy options; and a study of pain, disability, and chronic illness behavior. Ms. Howe, along with four colleagues, is a recipient of the National Research Council's 1992 Group Recognition Award, as well as the 1991 Group Achievement Award of the Institute of Medicine for her work on the report Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines<.

DOROTHY R. MAJEWSKI is a Project Assistant in the Institute of Medicine and has been with the National Academy of Sciences for 5 years. She received a B.A. degree in education from Carlow College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She served as project assistant on this study, with the review of adverse consequences of pertussis and rubella vaccines, and previously in the same capacity for studies on nuclear energy engineering for the Energy Engineering Board and on diet and health for the Food and Nutrition Board. Ms. Majewski, along with four colleagues, is a recipient of the National Research Council's 1992 Group Recognition Award, as well as the

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×

1991 Group Achievement Award of the Institute of Medicine for her work on the report Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines.

MICHAEL A. STOTO is the Director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University. He was formerly an associate professor of public policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He recently directed the Institute of Medicine effort in support of the Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project, and the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides; he also worked on the study reviewing the adverse consequences of pertussis and rubella vaccines. His current projects address a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, and AIDS. Dr. Stoto, along with four colleagues, is a recipient of the National Research Council's 1992 Group Recognition Award, as well as the 1991 Group Achievement Award of the Institute of Medicine for his work on the report Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines.

TAMAR LASKY is Research Assistant to the Chairman, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. She received her Ph.D. and M.S.P.H. degrees at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and did her undergraduate work at Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. Dr. Lasky has extensive research experience and has coauthored many public health publications.

MICHAEL K. HAYES has been an editorial consultant with the National Academy of Sciences, among other organizations, since 1985. He has edited numerous publications for the Institute of Medicine, including The Children's Vaccine Initiative: Achieving the Vision, Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines, and Nutrition Labeling. Mr. Hayes also edits research articles published in the monthly journals Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy and the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 342
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 343
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 344
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 345
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 346
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX D Committee and Staff Biographies ." Institute of Medicine. 1994. Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2138.
×
Page 347
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Childhood immunization is one of the major public health measures of the 20th century and is now receiving special attention from the Clinton administration. At the same time, some parents and health professionals are questioning the safety of vaccines because of the occurrence of rare adverse events after immunization.

This volume provides the most thorough literature review available about links between common childhood vaccines--tetanus, diphtheria, measles, mumps, polio, Haemophilus influenzae b, and hepatitis B--and specific types of disorders or death.

The authors discuss approaches to evidence and causality and examine the consequences--neurologic and immunologic disorders and death--linked with immunization. Discussion also includes background information on the development of the vaccines and details about the case reports, clinical trials, and other evidence associating each vaccine with specific disorders.

This comprehensive volume will be an important resource to anyone concerned about the immunization controversy: public health officials, pediatricians, attorneys, researchers, and parents.

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