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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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DEVELOPING A
21ST CENTURY
NEUROSCIENCE
WORKFORCE

WORKSHOP SUMMARY

Sheena M. Posey Norris, Christopher Palmer, Clare Stroud, and
Bruce M. Altevogt, Rapporteurs

Forum on Neuroscience and
Nervous System Disorders

Board on Health Sciences Policy

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
                  OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS • 500 Fifth Street, NW • Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The workshop that is the subject of this workshop summary was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

This project was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and the Alzheimer’s Association; Brain Canada Foundation; the Department of Health and Human Services’ Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health (NIH, Contract No. HHSN26300026 [Under Master Base #DHHS-10001292]) through the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, National Eye Institute, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute on Aging, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute on Drug Abuse, and NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research; Department of Veterans Affairs (VA240-14-C-0057); Eli Lilly and Company; Foundation for the National Institutes of Health; the Gatsby Charitable Foundation; GlaxoSmithKline, Inc.; Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, LLC; Lundbeck Research USA; Merck Research Laboratories; The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research; the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; the National Science Foundation (BCS-1064270); One Mind for Research; Orion Bionetworks; Pfizer Inc.; Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC; Sanofi; the Society for Neuroscience; Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited; and Wellcome Trust. The views presented in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for this project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-36874-2
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-36874-X

Additional copies of this report are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu.

For more information about the Institute of Medicine, visit the IOM home page at: www.iom.edu.

Copyright 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost all cultures and religions since the beginning of recorded history. The serpent adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the Staatliche Museen in Berlin.

Suggested citation: IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2015. Developing a 21st century neuroscience workforce: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

Knowing is not enough; we must apply.
Willing is not enough; we must do.
”      

                                                —Goethe

image

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
              OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advising the Nation. Improving Health.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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PLANNING COMMITTEE ON DEFINING THE EXPERTISE
NEEDED FOR THE 21ST CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE
WORKFORCE1

HUDA AKIL (Co-Chair), University of Michigan

STEVIN ZORN (Co-Chair), Lundbeck Research USA

NEERAJ AGARWAL, National Eye Institute

RICHARD BORN, Harvard Medical School

KATJA BROSE, Neuron

KARL DEISSEROTH, Stanford University

NANCY DESMOND, National Institute of Mental Health

SALVATORE ENNA, University of Kansas Medical Center

DEAN HARTLEY, Alzheimer’s Association National Office

CHYREN HUNTER, National Institute on Aging

WALTER KOROSHETZ, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

RICHARD MOHS, Eli Lilly and Company

JOHN MORRISON, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

ATUL PANDE, Tal Medical

ARES ROSAKIS, California Institute of Technology

SUSAN WEISS, National Institute on Drug Abuse

JOHN WILLIAMS, Wellcome Trust

JOHN WINGFIELD, National Science Foundation

IOM Staff

BRUCE M. ALTEVOGT, Project Director

CLARE STROUD, Senior Program Officer (since September 2014)

DIANA PANKEVICH, Program Officer (until August 2014)

SHEENA M. POSEY NORRIS, Associate Program Officer

DOUGLAS KANOVSKY, Senior Program Assistant (until October 2014)

_________________________

1Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

FORUM ON NEUROSCIENCE AND NERVOUS
SYSTEM DISORDERS1

STEVEN HYMAN (Chair), The Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University

STORY LANDIS (Vice Chair), Former Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

SUSAN AMARA, Society for Neuroscience

MARK BEAR, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

STEPHEN BRANNAN, Takeda Pharmaceuticals International, Inc.

KATJA BROSE, Cell Press

DANIEL BURCH, Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC

SARAH CADDICK, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

ROSA CANET-AVILES, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

JANET CARBARY, One Mind for Research

MARIA CARRILLO, Alzheimer’s Association

C. THOMAS CASKEY, Baylor College of Medicine

KAREN CHANDROSS, Sanofi US

TIMOTHY COETZEE, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

FAY LOMAX COOK, National Science Foundation

SARAH DEROSSETT, GlaxoSmithKline

WILLIAM DUNN, Food and Drug Administration

EMMELINE EDWARDS, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

MARTHA FARAH, University of Pennsylvania

DANIEL GESCHWIND, University of California, Los Angeles

HANK GREELY, Stanford University

MAGALI HAAS, Orion Bionetworks

RICHARD HODES, National Institute on Aging

STUART HOFFMAN, Department of Veterans Affairs

THOMAS INSEL, National Institute of Mental Health

PHILLIP IREDALE, Pfizer Global Research and Development

JOHN ISAAC, Wellcome Trust

INEZ JABALPURWALA, Brain Canada Foundation

DANIEL JAVITT, New York University School of Medicine

FRANCES JENSEN, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

_________________________

1Institute of Medicine forums and roundtables do not issue, review, or approve individual documents. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution.

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

GEORGE KOOB, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

WALTER KOROSHETZ, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

ALAN LESHNER, American Association for the Advancement of Science

HUSSEINI MANJI, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, LLC

DAVID MICHELSON, Merck Research Laboratories

RICHARD MOHS, Lilly Research Laboratories

JAMES OLDS, National Science Foundation

ATUL PANDE, Tal Medical

STEVEN PAUL, Weill Cornell Medical College

TODD SHERER, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

DAVID SHURTLEFF, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

PAUL SIEVING, National Eye Institute

NORA VOLKOW, National Institute on Drug Abuse

DAVID WHOLLEY, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

JOHN WILLIAMS, Wellcome Trust

STEVIN ZORN, Lundbeck Research USA

IOM Staff

BRUCE M. ALTEVOGT, Forum Co-Director

CLARE STROUD, Forum Co-Director

SHEENA M. POSEY NORRIS, Associate Program Officer

ANNALYN M. WELP, Senior Program Assistant

ANDREW M. POPE, Director, Board on Health Sciences Policy

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Reviewers

This workshop summary has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published workshop summary as sound as possible and to ensure that the workshop summary meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this workshop summary:

HOWARD FEDEROFF, Georgetown University

EVE MARDER, Brandeis University

CAROL MASON, Columbia University

JULIO RAMIREZ, Davidson College

FRANK YOCCA, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they did not see the final draft of the workshop summary before its release. The review of this workshop summary was overseen by ENRIQUETA BOND, Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Appointed by the Institute of Medicine, she was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this workshop summary was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

final content of this workshop summary rests entirely with the rapporteurs and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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From its very beginning, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdisciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advances and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to rely on expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. This raises important questions about to how to develop and train the next generation of neuroscientists to ensure innovation in research and technology in the neurosciences. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing importance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train students in approaches to data analysis and sharing. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific practices ranging from experimental design (e.g., powering of studies and appropriate blinding) to improved sophistication in statistics. Of equal importance is the increasing need not only for basic researchers and teams that will develop the next generation of tools, but also for investigators who are able to bridge the translational gap between basic and clinical neuroscience.

Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders on October 28 and 29,2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs. Workshop participants considered what new subdisciplines and collaborations might be needed, including an examination of opportunities for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas. In addition, current and new components of training programs were discussed to identify methods for enhancing data handling and analysis capabilities, increasing scientific accuracy, and improving research practices. This report highlights the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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