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Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary (2015)

Chapter: Appendix D: Participant Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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D

Participant Biographies

Huda Akil, Ph.D., is the Gardner Quarton Distinguished University Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry and the co-director of the Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute at the University of Michigan. Dr. Akil, together with Dr. Stanley J. Watson and their colleagues, have made seminal contributions to the understanding of the brain biology of emotions, including pain, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. She and her collaborators provided the first physiological evidence for a role of endorphins in the brain, and showed that endorphins are activated by stress and cause pain inhibition. Dr. Akil’s current research investigates the genetic, molecular, and neural mechanisms underlying stress, addiction, and mood disorders. Along with Dr. Watson, she is the Michigan site director of the Pritzker Consortium, which is engaged in large-scale studies to discover new genes and proteins that cause vulnerability to major depression and bipolar illness. She is the author of more than 500 original scientific papers, and has been recognized as one of the most highly cited neuroscientists by the ISI Citation Index.

Dr. Akil’s scientific contributions have been recognized with numerous honors and awards. These include the Pacesetter Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in 1993 and the Pasarow Award (with S. J. Watson) for Neuroscience Research in 1994. In 1998, she received the Sachar Award from Columbia University, and the Bristol Myers Squibb Unrestricted Research Funds Award. She is also the recipient of the Society for Neuroscience Mika Salpeter Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Patricia Goldman-Rakic Prize for Cognitive Neuroscience (2007), and the Koch Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (2010). She has shared with Dr. Watson the Thomas

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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William Salmon Award in 2010, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Sarnat Award in 2012. In 2013, she received the Association of American Medical Colleges Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences. In 1994, Dr. Akil was elected to the membership in the IOM. She was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2000. In 2004, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2011 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Dr. Akil’s service includes membership on numerous boards and scientific councils. She has served on several national and international organizations to promote scientific and brain health awareness nationally and globally. She is a past president of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (1998) and the Society for Neuroscience (2004), the largest neuroscience organization in the world. She has co-chaired the Neuroscience Steering Committee for Biomarkers Development at the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. She has served two terms on the Council of the IOM, and currently serves on the National Research Council review board. She is also a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

James E. Barrett, Ph.D., is professor and chair of pharmacology and physiology as well as founding director of the Drug Discovery and Development Program at Drexel University College of Medicine and of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Drexel University. He received his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, followed by postdoctoral training in Neuropsychopharmacology at the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology. He has served on the faculty at the University of Maryland and at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, where he was a professor in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Barrett joined Wyeth as vice president of Neuroscience Discovery Research following the merger with Lederle Laboratories, where he had been director of Central Nervous System Research. Prior to his current position at Drexel University College of Medicine, he was senior vice president, chief scientific officer, and president, research at Adolor Corporation, a company focused on pain pharmaceuticals. He moved to Adolor after serving as president of R&D at Memory Pharmaceuticals, a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to the development of drugs for the treatment of debilitating central nervous system (CNS) disorders. He has published more than 275 scientific articles, books, and abstracts in the areas of neuropharmacology, neurobiology, behavioral pharmacolo-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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gy, translational research, and neuroscience, and serves on several editorial boards. He has served as president of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society and of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET). He served as the chair of the Board of Publication Trustees for ASPET and served on the Board of Directors for the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, where he was a member of the Science Policy Committee and the Public Affairs Committee as well as chair of the Breakthrough Series in Science and Horizons in Bioscience Series. Dr. Barrett recently joined the ASPET Board as series editor for the handbook of experimental pharmacology. He has received the Solvay-Duphar Award for Research on Affective Disorders, the George B. Koelle Award from the Mid-Atlantic Pharmacology Society for contributions to teaching and research, and, most recently, the P.B. Dews Lifetime Achievement Award for Research in Behavioral Pharmacology. Dr. Barrett is a member of the External Scientific Advisory Board, Preclinical Autism Consortium for Therapeutics. He is also president of the Association of Medical School Pharmacology Chairs and was recently elected to the Executive Committee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. In addition to being a member of ASPET, he is a member of AAAS and the American Pain Society and a Fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. His current research emphasis is in the area of pain, its co-morbid pathologies, and basic mechanisms and new therapeutics.

Richard T. Born, M.D., is a professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School and was director of the Harvard Ph.D. Program in Neuroscience from 2009 to 2014. He earned a B.A. in Chemistry from DePauw University. He attended Harvard Medical School, where he discovered the joys of visual neurophysiology by working with Professors David Hubel and Margaret Livingstone. After receiving his M.D. in 1988, he continued on as a postdoctoral fellow in the Hubel/Livingstone lab, undertook a second postdoc with William Newsome at Stanford, and then returned to Harvard Medical School in 1995 as an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology. He is currently a member of the Faculty of 1000 and serves on the Sensory Processing and Cognition Study Section at NIH. His laboratory studies cortical visual processing in nonhuman primates, with a particular interest in the nature of cortico-cortical feedback.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Katja Brose, Ph.D., is editor of Neuron and executive editor-neuroscience and director of reviews strategy, Cell Press. As editor of Neuron, Dr. Brose represents the journal within the scientific community and is responsible for all aspects of the journal’s management, operations, and strategic vision. She earned her undergraduate degree in 1990 from Brown University, with a double concentration in Biology and European History. She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She performed her graduate work in the laboratory of Dr. Marc Tessier Lavigne, focusing on axon guidance mechanisms in the developing spinal cord. In collaboration with Corey Goodman’s laboratory at UC Berkeley, her research led to the identification of the receptor Robo and its ligand Slit as a new family of axon guidance molecules.

In 2000, Dr. Brose joined Cell Press as a senior editor at Neuron. Neuron is the sister journal of Cell and is 1 of 12 life science journals at Cell Press, a division of Elsevier Science and Technology journal publishing. Dr. Brose was promoted to deputy editor in 2002 and appointed editor-in-chief in 2004. During her tenure as editor, Neuron has undertaken a major expansion of its scope, building on its historical strengths in molecular and cellular neuroscience to now cover all areas of neuroscience, from molecular/cellular mechanisms to systems and cognitive neuroscience, genetics, neurological and psychiatric disease, theoretical neuroscience, and emerging technologies. In 2007, with Cell Press’s acquisition of the Trends group of review titles, Dr. Brose was appointed as executive editor of the Neuroscience Portfolio, which includes, in addition to Neuron, the review journals Trends in Neurosciences and Trends in Cognitive Sciences. She currently also serves as editorial director for reviews strategy for Cell Press and is a member of the Cell Press senior management team. She speaks frequently on topics related to scientific publishing and communication, including publication ethics.

Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D., is the Edward Hood Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School; and a practicing anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Brown received his B.A. (magna cum laude) in Applied Mathematics from Harvard College, his M.A. in Statistics from Harvard University, his M.D. (magna cum laude) from Harvard Medical School, and his Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University. Dr. Brown is an anesthesiologist-statistician whose experimental research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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has made important contributions toward understanding the neuroscience of how anesthetics act in the brain to create the states of general anesthesia. In his statistics research, he has developed signal processing algorithms to solve important data analysis challenges in neuroscience. He served on the NIH BRAIN Initiative Working Group, and is currently a member of the NIH Council of Councils, the National Science Foundation (NSF) Mathematics and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee, the Board of Directors of the Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, and the Board of Trustees of the International Anesthesia Research Society. He is a recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, an NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award, and the 2011 Jerome Sacks Award from the National Institute of Statistical Science. Dr. Brown is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, AAAS, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the IOM and the NAS.

David Lopes Cardozo, Ph.D., has served for the past 7 years as associate dean for graduate studies and director of the Division of Medical Sciences at Harvard Medical School. He received his B.A. in English Literature from Concordia University. This was followed by 7 years of service as an officer in the Royal Canadian Navy and as a master of merchant vessels trading in the Caribbean. Following his career at sea, he received a B.Sc. in Biology from Dalhousie University and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard. After his postdoc, he joined the faculty of the Neurobiology Department at Harvard Medical School. His research is directed at studying the filum terminale of the spinal cord as a source for autologous neural stem cells that can be used for the treatment of neurological disease. For 14 years he was the course director for the human nervous system and behavior course, which is taken by second-year medical students.

Marie-Francoise Chesselet, M.D., Ph.D., is the Charles H. Markham Professor of Neurology and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Neurology and the Department of Neurobiology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). After receiving her M.D. and Ph.D. in Paris, she held research positions in France and faculty positions at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and the University of Pennsylvania, before joining UCLA in 1996. At UCLA, Dr. Chesselet chaired the Department of Neurobiology from 2002 to 2013. She is currently the director of the Integrative Center for Neural Repair, which includes the Center

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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for the Study of Parkinson’s Disease at UCLA that she created in 1998. She has directed the NIH-funded UCLA Udall Center for Parkinson’s disease research (National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, or NINDS; 1998–2013) and UCLA Center for Gene Environment in Parkinson’s Disease (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, or NIEHS; 2002–2014), and the UCLA Advanced Center for Parkinson’s Disease Research of the American Parkinson Disease Association since 1998. Dr. Chesselet has directed graduate programs at the University of Pennsylvania and UCLA and has directed the NINDS-funded Training Program in Neural Repair since 1998. Her laboratory conducts research on the molecular mechanisms of disorders of the basal ganglia and new treatments for Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Currently, her work is supported by the Department of Defense, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and biopharmaceutical companies. Dr. Chesselet is a Fellow of AAAS and the chair-elect of its section on neuroscience. She serves on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council (NAEHS Council).

Dennis Choi, M.D., Ph.D., is currently professor and chair of the Department of Neurology, and director of the Neurosciences Institute, at Stony Brook University. He was formerly executive vice president at the Simons Foundation in New York City, vice president for Academic Health Affairs at Emory University, executive vice president for neuroscience at Merck Research Labs, and head of neurology at Washington University Medical School. Dr. Choi received his M.D. from the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program, as well as a Ph.D. in pharmacology and neurology training from Harvard. He is a co-discoverer of the physiological mechanism of action of benzodiazepine drugs, and a pioneer in dissecting processes responsible for pathological neurodegeneration. He is a member of the IOM, a fellow of AAAS, a past president of the Society for Neuroscience, and a past vice president of the American Neurological Association.

Mark Cohen, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry, neurology, radiology, psychology, biomedical physics, and biomedical engineering at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior and the Staglin Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. Dr. Cohen did his undergraduate studies at both MIT and Stanford University, where he received his bachelor’s degree in human biology. He then went to the Rockefeller

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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University, where he trained under Victor Wilson, Donald Pfaff, and Susan Schwartz Giblin, receiving his Ph.D. for his work on the pudendal nerve evoked response and its modulation by steroid hormones. In 1985 Dr. Cohen joined the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Applications Group at Siemens Healthcare, where he began a career in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) focused originally on education, and on technological improvements to reduce scan times. From 1988 to 1990, he directed the applications program at Advanced NMR Systems, a small start-up dedicated to the creation of a practical echo-planar imaging instrument. He joined the faculty at Harvard/Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in 1990, when he directed the “Hyperscan” fast imaging laboratory, and the MRI education program until 1993. Since then he has been at UCLA, where he developed, with John Mazziotta, the first dedicated functional MRI (fMRI) center.

Dr. Cohen’s training is equal parts engineering and neuroscience. His contributions include his critical role in the development of practical echo-planar scanning, ultra-fast MRI applications, contrast-based and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI, applications of linear systems analysis to increase fMRI sensitivity and resolution, and concurrent recordings of electroencephalography and fMRI to better understand brain dynamics and distributed processing. He and his lab have contributed to an understanding of the power of pattern recognition and machine learning to both interpret/classify neural data and as a source of discovery of the processes that result in cognition, perception, emotion, and pathology.

Dr. Cohen is passionate about graduate and postgraduate education. As the creator and director of the UCLA/Semel NeuroImaging Training Program, he has pushed his students to an integrative understanding of the role of imaging in neuroscience: the use of images as hypothesis tests; the relationships among blurring, convolution, statistical error, and inference from images; and an understanding of the structures common to neuroimages regardless of imaging modality. His current focus now includes inquiry into the broader problems of images, beyond neuroscience, to encompass astronomy and nanoscale imaging, aesthetics to statistics, dimensional compression, and dimensional expansion.

Nancy L. Desmond, Ph.D., is currently an associate director in the Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science (DNBBS) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Before joining NIH in 2003, Dr. Desmond was associate professor of neurosurgery at the University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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of Virginia School of Medicine and a member of the Neuroscience Graduate Program there. She was the principal investigator (PI) on grants from NIMH/NIH and NSF that focused on understanding synaptic modification in the hippocampus. Dr. Desmond served as a peer reviewer of grants for NIH, NSF, and other agencies. She obtained her Ph.D. in physiological psychology from the University of California, Riverside, and then did postdoctoral training in Neuroscience at the University of Virginia. At NIMH, Dr. Desmond directs the DNBBS Office of Research Training and Career Development, co-coordinates research training for NIMH, and is chief of the Neuroendocrinology and Neuroimmunology Program. She has contributed to multiple NIH-wide efforts related to research training and career development, including a stint as co-chair of the NIH Training Advisory Committee, participating in NIH Roadmap, Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, and BRAIN training initiatives, and recently serving as the acting NIH research training officer. In that position, she led the reissuance of the parent NIH training and career development funding announcements, and contributed to implementation of the recommendations of the Biomedical Research Workforce Working Group to the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director. Current NIH-level activities include co-chairing the policy subcommittee of the NIH Training Advisory Committee; co-coordinating the working group for the NIH Common Fund program, Strengthening the Biomedical Research Workforce; and participating in the Trans-NIH Microbiome Working Group.

Howard Federoff, M.D., Ph.D., is the executive vice president for health sciences at Georgetown University and executive dean of the School of Medicine. Dr. Federoff is responsible for Georgetown University Medical Center. He is a professor of neurology and neuroscience. Prior to Georgetown, he held appointments as senior associate dean; professor of neurology, medicine, microbiology, and immunology; and professor of oncology and genetics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, and as founding director of the Center for Aging and Development Biology at the Aab Institute of Biomedical Sciences and founding division chief of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy. He also directed the University of Rochester’s Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program. Dr. Federoff’s research interests include gene therapy and neurodegenerative diseases. He has published more than 250 peer reviewed and invited articles and acts as a reviewer for many journals. He is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, Open Genomics

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Journal, and Journal of Experimental Neurology. Dr. Federoff served as chair of the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee from 2007 to 2010. He chairs the Gene Therapy Resource Program for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, was president of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (2012–2013), and is president of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics. Dr. Federoff received his M.S., Ph.D., and M.D. from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He did his internship, residency, and clinical and research Fellowships at MGH/Harvard Medical School, and practiced medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and University of Rochester. He is a Fellow of AAAS and National Academy of Inventors.

Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Ph.D., is the assistant director of NSF’s Education and Human Resources, a position she has held since 2011. Previously at NSF she served as the inaugural division director of the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings. Dr. Ferrini-Mundy served as an ex officio member of the U.S. President’s National Mathematics Advisory Panel, and co-chaired its Instructional Practices Task Group. She was a member of the Mathematics Expert Group of the Programme for International Student Assessment. Currently Dr. Ferrini-Mundy is co-chair of the White House National Science and Technology Council’s Federal Coordination in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education Task Force. Prior to joining NSF, she was a University Distinguished Professor of Mathematics Education at Michigan State University. She holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from the University of New Hampshire. She was elected a fellow of AAAS, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Association of Women in Mathematics. Her research interests are in calculus learning, mathematics teacher knowledge, and K–12 STEM education policy.

Thomas Insel, M.D., graduated from Boston University, where he received a B.A. from the College of Liberal Arts and an M.D. from the Medical School. He did his internship at Berkshire Medical Center, Pitts-field, Massachusetts, and his residency at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute at UCSF. In 1979 Dr. Insel joined NIMH, where he served in various scientific research positions until 1994, when he went to Emory University as professor, Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, and director of the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center. As director of Yerkes, Dr. Insel built one of the nation’s leading HIV vaccine research programs. He also served as the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, a Science and Technology Center funded by NSF to develop an interdisciplinary consortium for research and education at eight Atlanta colleges and universities.

Dr. Insel’s scientific interests have ranged from clinical studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder to explorations of the molecular basis of social behaviors in rodents and non-human primates. His research on oxytocin and affiliative behaviors, such as parental care and pair bonding, helped to launch the field of social neuroscience. Dr. Insel oversees NIMH’s $1.4 billion research budget, which provides support to investigators at universities throughout the country in the areas of basic science; clinical research, including large-scale trials of new treatments; and studies of the organization and delivery of mental health service.

Sofia Jurgensen, Ph.D., Pharm.D., received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Neuroscience in 2011 from Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She also has a master’s in Pharmacology and a Pharm.D., both from Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. After a postdoc of 1 year in Brazil, she joined the laboratory of Dr. Pablo Castillo at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York, where she has been a Research Fellow in Neuroscience since 2012. Her areas of expertise are synaptic physiology, autism spectrum disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Jurgensen serves several roles at the Society for Neuroscience, including being the current chair of the Trainee Advisory Committee and a member of the Latin America Training Program Advisory Group.

Darcy Kelley, Ph.D., is the Harold Weintraub Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. Her laboratory studies vocal communication, focusing on molecular, neural, behavioral, and evolutionary mechanisms that underlie the match between hearing and utterance. She has identified sex-specific structures, neural circuits, and interactive vocal behaviors shaped by the expression of sex steroids and their receptors in African clawed frogs. Her laboratory has identified a diverse array of CNS and peripheral mechanisms responsible for producing the signature male courtship songs of different species. In 2014, she became a Fellow of the International Society for Neuroethology. Dr. Kelley has a longstanding interest in neuroscience education. She established Columbia’s undergraduate major in Neuroscience and Behavior in 1986 and founded Columbia’s graduate program in Neurobiology and Behavior in 1995. In 2002 she was appointed to a Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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(HHMI) Professorship to support educational innovation. She also has a strong interest in the portrayal of science in theater and films. Dr. Kelley is a scientific consultant on plays and movies for the Sloan Foundation and has participated in the Sundance, New York, Hamptons, Imagine, and Tribeca Film Festivals. She is on the Board of Trustees of the Wenner Gren Foundation and the American Association of Colleges & Universities.

Walter Koroshetz, M.D., became the acting director of NINDS in October, 2014. Previously, he served as deputy director of NINDS under Dr. Story Landis. Together, they directed program planning and budgeting, and oversaw the scientific and administrative functions of the institute. He has held leadership roles in a number of NIH and NINDS programs, including the NIH’s BRAIN Initiative, the Traumatic Brain Injury Center collaborative effort between the NIH intramural program and the Uniformed Health Services University, and the multiyear work to develop and establish the NIH Office of Emergency Care Research to coordinate NIH emergency care research and research training. Before joining NINDS, Dr. Koroshetz served as vice chair of the neurology service and director of stroke and neurointensive care services at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He was a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and led neurology resident training at MGH between 1990 and 2007. Over that same period, he co-directed the HMS Neurobiology of Disease course with Drs. Edward Kravitz and Robert H. Brown.

A native of Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Koroshetz graduated from Georgetown University and received his M.D. from the University of Chicago. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and MGH. Dr. Koroshetz trained in neurology at MGH, after which he did postdoctoral studies in cellular neurophysiology at MGH with Dr. David Corey, and later at the Harvard neurobiology department with Dr. Edward Furshpan, studying mechanisms of excitoxicity and neuroprotection. He joined the neurology staff, first in the Huntington’s disease (HD) unit, followed by the stroke and neurointensive care service. A major focus of his clinical research career was to develop measures in patients that reflect the underlying biology of their conditions. With the MGH team he discovered increased brain lactate in HD patients using MR spectroscopy. He helped the team to pioneer the use of diffusion/perfusion-weighted MR imaging and CT angiography/perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Active in the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), Dr. Koroshetz chaired the professional organization’s Public Information Committee, led the AAN’s efforts to establish acute stroke therapy in the United States, founded the Stroke Systems Working Group, and was a member of the AAN board of directors.

Story Landis, Ph.D., was director of NINDS from 2003 to 2014. A native of New England, Dr. Landis received her undergraduate degree from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. from Harvard University. After postdoctoral work at Harvard University, she served on the faculty of its Department of Neurobiology. In 1985, she joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She created the Department of Neurosciences, which, under her leadership, achieved an international reputation for excellence. Throughout her research career, Dr. Landis made fundamental contributions to the understanding of nervous system development. She is an elected fellow of the IOM, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and AAAS. In 2002 she was elected president of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Landis joined NINDS in 1995 as scientific director and worked to reengineer the institute’s intramural research programs. Between 1999 and 2000, she led the movement, together with the NIMH scientific director, to bring a sense of unity and common purpose to 200 neuroscience laboratories from 11 NIH Institutes. As NINDS director, Dr. Landis oversaw an annual budget of $1.5 billion that supported research by investigators in public and private institutions across the country, as well as by scientists working in its intramural program. Together with the directors of NIMH and the National Institute on Aging, she co-chaired the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, a roadmap-like effort to support trans-NIH activities in the brain sciences.

Diane Lipscombe, Ph.D., is a professor of neuroscience at Brown University. Dr. Lipscombe co-directs the Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits; chairs the steering committee for the Neuroscience Graduate Program and Graduate Partnerships Program with NIH; and directed the Neuroscience Graduate Program from 2004 to 2012. She is PI of the NIMH Jointly Sponsored Predoctoral Training Program in Neuroscience and co-PI of the Advanced NINDS Predoctoral Training Program in Neural Dynamics. Dr. Lipscombe is recognized for her studies of neuronal ion channels, in particular voltage-gated calcium ion channels in neurons. She studies cell-specific mechanisms that control pro-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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cessing of voltage-gated calcium ion channel RNAs in neurons, and the functional role of voltage-gated calcium ion channels in normal and disease states, including in chronic pain. Dr. Lipscombe is a regular member of an NIH study section and also regularly reviews T32 training grant applications. Former editor of the Journal of Neuroscience, she currently chairs the Scientific Publications Committee and served on the Ethics Committee for the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Lipscombe has graduated a number of predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees from her own lab and has received several awards from Brown University for outstanding teaching and mentoring. She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees in pharmacology from University College London.

Brian Litt, M.D., obtained a degree in engineering and applied sciences from Harvard University in 1982 and his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1986, where he stayed for an Osler Internship, postdoctoral fellowship in bioengineering, neurology residency, and fellowship in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology. Dr. Litt stayed on the faculty at Johns Hopkins before moving to Emory University and Georgia Tech, with a joint appointment in neurology and biomedical engineering in 1996. In 2000, he was recruited to neurology and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is now a professor and divides his time equally between separate tenured appointments in the School of Medicine (neurology) and School of Engineering (bioengineering). He is director of the Penn Epilepsy Center at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and director of the Translational Neuroengineering Laboratory in Bioengineering, where he teaches a programming intensive graduate course on brain-computer interfaces.

Eve Marder, Ph.D., is the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience in the Biology Department of Brandeis University, where she also heads the Division of Science at Brandeis. Dr. Marder was president of the Society for Neuroscience in 2008, and is now a member of the NINDS Council. She is a member of the NAS, the IOM, and AAAS. She is a fellow of the Biophysical Society and a Fellow of AAAS. She received the Miriam Salpeter Memorial Award for Women in Neuroscience, the W. F. Gerard Prize from the Society for Neuroscience, the George A. Miller Award from the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, the Karl Spencer Lashley Prize from the American Philosophical Society, an Honorary Doctorate from Bowdoin College, and the Gruber Award in Neuroscience. Dr. Marder studies the dynamics of small neuronal net-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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works, and her work was instrumental in demonstrating that neuronal circuits are not hard-wired, but can be reconfigured by neuromodulatory neurons and substances to produce a variety of outputs. For more than 20 years, Dr. Marder’s lab has combined experimental work with insights from modeling and theoretical studies. Her lab pioneered studies of homeostatic regulation of intrinsic membrane properties, and stimulated work on the mechanisms by which brains remain stable while allowing for change during development and learning. Dr. Marder is now studying the extent to which similar network performance can arise from different sets of underlying network parameters, opening up rigorous studies of the variations in individual brains of normal healthy animals.

Maryann Martone, Ph.D., is co-director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). In 1993 she joined the Department of Neurosciences, where she is currently a professor in residence. Dr. Martone received her B.A. in biological psychology from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in neuroscience from UCSD. She is the PI of the Neuroscience Information Framework project, a national project to establish a uniform resource description framework for neuroscience. Her recent work has focused on building ontologies for neuroscience for data integration. She recently finished her tenure as the U.S. scientific representative to the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF), an international organization dedicated to developing tools and standards for neuroscience data exchange. Dr. Martone is a practicing neuroscientist, with expertise in neuroanatomy and light and electron microscopy. For the past decade, she has been working in the area of neuroinformatics to increase access to and use of neuroscience data. To further develop the framework, she heads the ontology development program for the INCF and the Data Standards Workstream for the newly launched One Mind for Research campaign. Through Neuroscience Information Framework and her neuroscience background, Dr. Martone has a unique global perspective on issues in data sharing and usage in the neurosciences and has gained considerable insight and expertise in working with diverse biomedical data. She has also continued to explore how these knowledge frameworks can be used to solve difficult problems in neurodegenerative disease through modeling of structural phenotypes in animal models of human neurodegenerative conditions.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

Carol Mason, Ph.D., is a professor of pathology and cell biology, neuroscience, and ophthalmology at Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Mason’s research has addressed the dynamic structure of neurons and their processes in the context of the mature and developing cerebellum and visual system. In recent years, she has studied how the visual pathways are established from the retina through the optic chiasm to thalamic targets. Her work has revealed a molecular program of transcription and guidance factors that specify the ipsilateral and contralateral retinal ganglion cell pathways during the establishment of binocular circuitry. Current work applies these findings to the albino visual system, in which the lack of melanin leads to anatomical and functional perturbations of this circuit. Dr. Mason is a fellow of AAAS and the IOM. As co-director of the doctoral program in neurobiology and behavior at Columbia, and current president of the Society for Neuroscience, she has focused on training the next generation of neuroscientists, mentoring at all career stages, and promoting science communication to the public.

Marguerite Matthews, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Behavioral Neuroscience at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), where she uses functional connectivity MRI, along with computational approaches, to study typical and atypical brain organization in children and adolescents. She received a Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Pittsburgh, and a B.S. in biochemistry from Spelman College. In addition to her research at OHSU, Dr. Matthews directs a science education and outreach program, Youth Engaged in Science (YES!), developed with her research mentor, Damien Fair, PA-C, Ph.D. The YES! initiative aims to expose underrepresented minority youth in the Portland area to science, research, and STEM-related careers through in-class educational activities, laboratory tours, mentorship, and research internship opportunities. She has also worked closely with faculty and administrators to launch a research fellowship program aimed at increasing diversity at OHSU through the targeted recruitment of underrepresented minority postdocs and junior faculty to OHSU. Dr. Matthews is also an active member of the Society for Neuroscience and serves on the Society’s Trainee Advisory Committee and the Advocacy Working Group. She is also a member of the Association of Underrepresented Minority Fellows.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

Richard C. Mohs, Ph.D., is the vice president for Neuroscience Early Clinical Development and a Distinguished Research Fellow within Lilly Research Laboratories. He and his staff are responsible for phase I through phase II studies of molecules being developed for any neuroscience indication, with most molecules targeted for depression, schizophrenia, pain, Alzheimer’s disease, or other neurodegenerative disease. Dr. Mohs joined Eli Lilly and Company in 2002, working in the early phase development group until 2006–2011, when he led the phase III development team for Eli Lilly’s Alzheimer’s disease compounds. He returned to lead the early phase development group in 2011. Dr. Mohs received his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral training in pharmacology at the Stanford University Medical School. He holds a faculty appointment at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Before joining Eli Lilly in 2002, Dr. Mohs spent 23 years with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where he was professor in the Department of Psychiatry and associate chief of staff for research at the Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The author or co-author of more than 300 scientific papers, Dr. Mohs has conducted research studies on aging, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and cognitive function. Among his studies are clinical trials that led to the approval, in the United States and other countries, of cholinergic drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Mohs has served as an adviser to many neuroscience research programs at universities and to several foundations supporting neuroscience research, including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Charles A. Dana Foundation, and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation.

John H. Morrison, Ph.D., is currently dean of Basic Sciences and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, professor of neuroscience, and the Willard T. C. Johnson Professor of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine (Neurobiology of Aging) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He served as chair of the Department of Neuroscience until 2006, when he stepped down as chair to become dean. Dr. Morrison earned his bachelor’s and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, and completed postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Dr. Floyd E. Bloom at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. He then served as a faculty member at The Scripps Research Institute, until he joined the faculty at Mount Sinai in 1989 to develop and lead a new Center for Neurobiology. Dr. Morrison’s research program focuses primarily on the neurobiology of aging and neurodegenerative disorders, particularly as they relate to cellular

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

and synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex. Within this broad arena, his lab works specifically on the interactions among endocrine factors (e.g., estrogen, stress steroids) and aging and the synaptic determinants of cognitive aging. His laboratory is particularly interested in age-related alterations in structural and molecular attributes of the synapse that compromise plasticity and lead to cognitive decline. Since 1985 NIH has funded Dr. Morrison’s research without interruption, and he currently directs a large NIH-funded project on Estrogen and the Aging Brain, as well as one on the neurobiological basis of cognitive aging that has been designated as an NIH MERIT Award. Dr. Morrison has published over 300 articles on cortical organization, the cellular pathology of neurodegenerative disorders, the neurobiology of cognitive aging, and the effects of stress on cortical circuitry. He has also edited five books on related topics. He has served on numerous editorial boards, advisory boards, NIH committees, and the board of directors of the American Federation for Aging Research. Dr. Morrison has served as president of both The Harvey Society and The Cajal Club, and was elected to the Council of the Society for Neuroscience in 2010 and served in that capacity until 2013.

Atul Pande, M.D., is president of Verity BioConsulting, an independent drug development consulting firm. Previously he was senior vice president and senior adviser, Pharmaceutical R&D at GlaxoSmithKline. For more than two decades he has been active in the development of many important central nervous system drugs while holding various senior roles in Pfizer R&D, Parke-Davis/Warner-Lambert, and Lilly Research Laboratories. His experience includes pre-Investigational New Drug development; proof of concept to registration development; and launch and lifecycle management in the areas of anxiety, depression, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Most recently he was also instrumental in the New Drug Application and Marketing Authorization Application submission and approval of medicines for asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV, and cancer. Dr. Pande is a psychiatrist and fellow of several scientific societies. He began his career as a faculty member at the University of Michigan Medical School, where his research focused on mood disorders. He has published more than 50 peer-reviewed scientific papers and more than 100 abstracts, book chapters, and book reviews.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

Katherine Prater is a Ph.D. candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program at the University of Michigan. Under the mentorship of Dr. Huda Akil, she is studying the brain mechanisms underlying individual differences in posttraumatic stress disorder acquisition. She is currently working in animal models and using molecular techniques to study the brain, but collaborates with other mentors who use fMRI to study human anxiety patients. Her main research interests involve a translational approach to anxiety research that allows a broader understanding of the underlying brain networks and cellular functioning in these debilitating disorders. Prater is also the co-founder of RELATE (Researchers Expanding Lay-Audience Teaching and Engagement), a combined training and service initiative to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students’ lay-audience communication skills. The inaugural RELATE workshop hosted 25 students from a variety of STEM disciplines. These trainees are currently engaging in lay-audience communication efforts around southeastern Michigan. Along with co-founder Elyse Aurbach, Prater hopes to influence STEM graduate education by providing professional development opportunities for candidate-level graduate students to positively impact the public’s relationship with scientific research.

Indira M. Raman, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Neurobiology at Northwestern University, where she holds the Bill and Gayle Cook Chair in Biology. She completed her Ph.D. in neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and postdoctoral training at the Vollum Institute and Harvard Medical School. Her research is in the areas of ion channel biophysics, synaptic transmission, and cerebellar physiology. From 2011–2014, she served as director of the Northwestern University Interdepartmental Neuroscience graduate training program, which unites about 150 faculty and 150 students in 20 departments in 7 schools of Northwestern. She has received awards for her teaching and scientific training of graduate and undergraduate students, including a Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, the university’s highest teaching honor.

Anthony Ricci, Ph.D., has a primary appointment in otolaryngology and a courtesy appointment in molecular and cellular physiology at Stanford University. He uses electrophysiological and optical tools to investigate the auditory periphery. He received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Case Western Reserve University. He received his doctorate in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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neuroscience from Tulane University. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Texas and a second fellowship at the University of Wisconsin, he was hired to his first faculty position at the Louisiana State University (LSU) Medical School in New Orleans. As an undergraduate he taught STEM courses to underrepresented minorities in Cleveland. While in graduate school he similarly worked with both high school and college students, teaching STEM courses. At LSU he oversaw three basic neuroscience courses for incoming students while being a part of both the admissions and the curriculum committees. Since joining Stanford 8 years ago he has directed the neuroscience program boot camp course required of all incoming students, as a long-term member of the admissions committee, as a senior member of the program committee, as the programs representative to the Biosciences Committee on Graduate Admissions and Policy, as a first-year adviser, and most recently as the director of the training program. In addition to these efforts within the neuroscience program, Dr. Ricci has promoted science and education across socioeconomic groups by founding the Advance Summer Research Institute. It provides a transition time for incoming graduate students across all bioscience programs, enabling them to do an early research rotation, participate in workshops for professional development, and learn the skills needed to be a successful graduate student.

Jane Roskams, Ph.D., is executive director (strategy and alliances) at the Allen Institute. She previously directed the lab of brain repair at the University of British Columbia, is a professor in psychiatry and zoology, and is also serving as associate dean. Dr. Roskams previously completed fellowships in neuroscience and neuropathology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and NIH. Her most recent research has focused on the contribution of stem-like cells to brain development and repair, and how DNA in the brain may be epigenetically rearranged to contribute to brain repair.

Terry Sejnowski, Ph.D., is a pioneer in computational neuroscience. His goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. His laboratory uses both experimental and modeling techniques to study the biophysical properties of synapses and neurons and the population dynamics of large networks of neurons. New computational models and new analytical tools have been developed to understand how the brain represents the world and how new representations are formed through learning algorithms for changing the synaptic strengths of connections among neu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

rons. He has published more than 300 scientific papers and 12 books, including The Computational Brain, with Patricia Churchland.

He received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. He was on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University and he now holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. He is also a professor at UCSD, where he is co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation and co-director of the NSF Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center. He is president of the Neural Information Processing Systems Foundation, which organizes an annual conference attended by more than 1,000 researchers in machine learning and neural computation. He is also the founding editor-in-chief of Neural Computation, published by the MIT Press. An investigator with HHMI, he is also a fellow of AAAS and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has received many honors, including the Wright Prize for interdisciplinary research from Harvey Mudd College, the Neural Network Pioneer Award from IEEE, and the Hebb Prize from the International Neural Network Society. He was elected to the IOM and the NAS.

Michael Springer, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School, where his research focuses on signal integration and evolution of signaling responses among yeast species. He has been heavily involved in teaching for over a decade. As a postdoctoral Fellow, Dr. Springer began teaching a short course on programming, image analysis, and modeling as part of the physiology course at Woods Hole Research Center (2004–2008). In 2010, professor of neurobiology Dr. Richard Born and Dr. Springer joined forces and expanded the course. The course is now a 5-day boot camp with four half-day review sessions. Ostensibly it is a programming course, but the programming component is designed as a foundation to discuss quantitative methods and reasoning and to introduce basic concepts in statistics, image analysis, and bioinformatics. Examples are focused around problems that students are likely to face in their own research. The course itself is taught using a number of active learning approaches. Dr. Springer received undergraduate degrees in biology and chemistry at Stanford University. He did his graduate work with Dr. Erin O’Shea at UCSF, integrating experiment and theory to study yeast phosphate homeostasis. During his postdoctoral work, conducted with Dr. Marc Kirschner at Harvard Medical School, he studied dosage compensation in yeast and developed high-throughput methodologies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

Oswald Steward, Ph.D., is known for his research on how nerve cells create and maintain their connections with each other, and how these synapses are modified after injury. He has also conducted research on how genes influence nerve cell regeneration, growth, and function and how physiological activity affects nerve cell connections. Dr. Steward is currently the chair and director of the Reeve-Irvine Research Center for Spinal Cord Injury at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), senior associate dean for research, and professor of anatomy and neurobiology. He serves on the board of the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation and as the chair of its Science Advisory Council. Dr. Steward was also chair of an NIH neurobiology review group and served on NIH’s Spinal Cord Injury Planning Committee. Prior to joining the faculty at UCI, he was a professor of neuroscience and neurosurgery at the University of Virginia, where he chaired the Department of Neuroscience.

Steward is a recipient of the NIH Research Career Development Award, the Jacob Javitz Neuroscience Investigator Award, and the Distinguished Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression. He earned a doctorate in Psychobiology from UCI and a bachelor’s in Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Richard W. Tsien, D.Phil., is director of the Neuroscience Institute, Druckenmiller Professor of Neuroscience, and chair of the Neuroscience and Physiology Department at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. Prior to joining NYU in 2011, Dr. Tsien served as the George D. Smith Professor of Molecular Genetic Medicine at Stanford University. While there, Dr. Tsien founded and served as the inaugural chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology. After a 6-year term as chair, in 1994 he co-led a successful Stanford-wide movement to establish an institute for neuroscience, the Stanford Brain Research Center, which he co-directed from 2000 through 2005. He served a 10-year term as the director and PI at Stanford’s Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience Research. As a scientist, Dr. Tsien is a world leader in the study of calcium channels and their signaling targets, particularly at pre- and postsynaptic sites. He studies how synapses contribute to neuronal computations and network function in both healthy and diseased brains. His research, generously supported by NIH and private foundations, has contributed substantially to understanding how neurotransmitters, drugs, and molecular alterations regulate calcium channels, and has implications for diverse clinical areas such as pain and autism. His

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

research has been published in more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, and he has served on editorial boards for numerous journals. He has also served as section chair for AAAS (Neuroscience Section) and NAS (Neurobiology Section) and has been a member of scientific advisory boards for several institutes, including HHMI. In 2011, Dr. Tsien was awarded the Axelrod Prize by the Society for Neuroscience and was most recently awarded the 2013 Cartwright Prize by Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Tsien received both an undergraduate and graduate degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT. He was a Rhodes Scholar, graduating with his doctorate in biophysics from Oxford University, England, after which he joined the faculty at Yale University School of Medicine and served for nearly two decades. He is a member of both the IOM and the NAS.

Douglas Weber, Ph.D., is a program manager in the Biological Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He is also an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. At DARPA, Dr. Weber is currently managing the Reliable Neurotechnology (RE-NET), HAPTIX, and ElectRx programs. Dr. Weber received a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Arizona State University. He completed postdoctoral training at the Centre for Neuroscience at the University of Alberta. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and has mentored undergraduate and graduate students in bioengineering; medical students; and postdoctoral fellows. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience and a senior member of IEEE.

Frank Yocca, Ph.D., is the vice president of Strategy and Externalization, and the Neuroscience Virtual Innovative Medicine Unit, at AstraZeneca R&D. He was formerly the vice president and head of CNS and pain drug discovery for AstraZeneca. Dr. Yocca received his Ph.D. in pharmacology from St. John’s University in New York City. His work focused on the effect of antidepressants on circadian rhythms. Subsequently he was a postdoctoral fellow at Mt. Sinai Department of Pharmacology. Prior to joining AstraZeneca, he was executive director at the Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute. Dr. Yocca originally joined the Bristol-Myers Company in 1984 as a postdoctoral fellow in CNS research. Using techniques he learned from his academic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

postdoctoral position, he helped to elucidate the mechanism of action of the anxiolytic drug Buspar. He then joined Bristol-Myers and made significant advances in understanding the physiological role of the 5-HT1A receptor and its role in psychiatric disease states. During the 21 years Dr. Yocca spent with Bristol-Myers and then Bristol-Myers Squibb, he supported a number of psychiatric discovery programs, helping to discover and develop the antidepressant drug Serzone. Throughout his tenure, Dr. Yocca continued to work in the field of serotonin and advanced a number of agents to clinical trials, including several antimigraine agents (avitriptan) as well as antipsychotics and anxiolytics. In the latter stages of his career at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Yocca became involved in externalization and development. He contributed to the in-licensing and development of the antipsychotic agent Abilify. Additionally, Dr. Yocca was part of the externalization team that in-licensed to the recently approved antidepressant agent Emsam, the first antidepressant to be administered through a patch. In development, he was early development project leader for corticotropin-releasing hormone antagonists and was involved in phase IV clinical trials with Abilify. Dr. Yocca is a member of numerous scientific societies, including the Society for Neuroscience and American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Stevin Zorn, Ph.D., is executive vice president of neuroscience research for Lundbeck Research USA, for which he has been a board member since 2008. He is a member of Lundbeck’s global research committee, development committee, R&D management group, and the R&D executive committee. His research focus is on discovering meaningful treatments to relieve suffering from both psychiatric and neurological diseases. He is currently leading Lundbeck’s Disease Biology Unit on Neuroinflammation to discover breakthrough therapies for psychoneurological diseases. Dr. Zorn received a B.S. in chemistry from Lafayette College, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in neurotoxicology and neuropharmacology, respectively, from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Subsequent postdoctoral research studies centered on basic research of brain and intracellular neuronal signaling mechanisms at the Rockefeller University, New York, New York, in Paul Greengard’s (Nobel Laureate) laboratory of molecular and cellular neuroscience. Prior to his current position, Dr. Zorn was with Pfizer Global Research and Development for nearly 20 years. His positions included head of General Pharmacology, Alzheimer’s Disease Development Team leader, head of Psychotherapeutics Biology, head of Neuroscience Therapeutics, and co-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
×

chair of the global Neuroscience Therapeutic Area Leadership Team, with accountability for R&D as well as commercialization. In addition, he was vice president and Global Therapeutic Area Head for Central Nervous System Disorders Research at Pfizer. Dr. Zorn has extensive drug discovery and drug development experience across a broad range of neuro- and psychiatric disorders and across the whole value chain for drug discovery and development. He has co-authored more than 100 scientific research communications and patents and has contributed to the advancement of a wide variety of drug candidates. Several of these candidates, including the antipsychotic drug Geodon, which Dr. Zorn played a seminal role in discovering and developing, are now in clinical use.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Participant Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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From its very beginning, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdisciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advances and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to rely on expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. This raises important questions about to how to develop and train the next generation of neuroscientists to ensure innovation in research and technology in the neurosciences. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing importance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train students in approaches to data analysis and sharing. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific practices ranging from experimental design (e.g., powering of studies and appropriate blinding) to improved sophistication in statistics. Of equal importance is the increasing need not only for basic researchers and teams that will develop the next generation of tools, but also for investigators who are able to bridge the translational gap between basic and clinical neuroscience.

Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders on October 28 and 29,2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs. Workshop participants considered what new subdisciplines and collaborations might be needed, including an examination of opportunities for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas. In addition, current and new components of training programs were discussed to identify methods for enhancing data handling and analysis capabilities, increasing scientific accuracy, and improving research practices. This report highlights the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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