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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Educate to Innovate

Factors That Influence Innovation

Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders

Prepared by:
Arden Bement, Jr.
Debasish (Deba) Dutta
and
Lalit Patil

In cooperation with the
National Academy of Engineering
and the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS    500 FIFTH STREET NW    WASHINGTON, DC 20001

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this monograph was developed with the input of a National Academy of Engineering advisory committee.

Work on the project was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. #1241823 to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), by the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professorship at UIUC, by BIMCON Inc., and by the National Academy of Engineering Fund.

The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Engineering, BIMCON Inc., or the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-36879-7
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-36879-0

Additional copies of this report are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; www.nap.edu.

Copyright 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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PROJECT TEAM

Debasish (Deba) Dutta, project director; scholar in residence, National Academy of Engineering; executive vice president for academic affairs and provost, Purdue University

Kimber Jo Andrews, graduate student, College of Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Laura Atkins, graduate statistics/research consultant, Department of Sociology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Liora Bresler, professor, College of Education, College of Fine and Applied Arts (School of Art and Design and School of Music), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Cameron H. Fletcher, senior editor, National Academy of Engineering

Penelope Gibbs, senior program associate, National Academy of Engineering

Barbara Hug, clinical associate professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Julian Martinez-Moreno, graduate student, Applied Technologies for Learning in the Arts and Sciences (ATLAS), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Lalit Patil, principal project researcher; postdoctoral research fellow, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Proctor Reid, director, Program Office, National Academy of Engineering

Kathleen Santa Ana, research coordinator, statistics/GIS consulting unit, Applied Technologies for Learning in the Arts and Sciences (ATLAS), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Maryalice Wu, director, Applied Technologies for Learning in the Arts and Sciences (ATLAS); supervisor, Statistics, GIS, Data, and Survey research group; and adjunct assistant professor, Department of Sociology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Arden Bement, Jr. (NAE), Chair, director emeritus, Global Policy Research Institute, Purdue University; former director, National Science Foundation (NSF); former director, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

John Seely Brown, independent cochair, Deloitte’s Center for the Edge; visiting scholar, University of Southern California; former chief scientist, Xerox Corporation; former director, Palto Alto Research Center (PARC)

Jared Cohon (NAE), president emeritus and university professor, Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

Nicholas Donofrio (NAE), senior fellow, Kauffman Foundation; former executive vice president of innovation and technology, IBM

James Duderstadt (NAE), president emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering, University of Michigan

Krisztina “Z” Holly, entrepreneur-in-residence for the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office; former vice provost for innovation at University of Southern California; founding executive director of the MIT Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation

C. D. Mote, Jr. (NAE) (until June 30, 2013), president, National Academy of Engineering; president emeritus and Glenn R. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering, University of Maryland

Gail Naughton, chair and CEO, Histogen, Inc., San Diego

Lydia Villa-Komaroff, chief scientific officer, Cytonome/ST, LLC, Boston

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support provided by the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL), Directorate of Education and Human Resources, National Science Foundation through Grant #1241823. They also acknowledge financial support from the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professorship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, BIMCON Inc., and the National Academy of Engineering Fund.

The authors thank all the interviewed innovators and the participants of the October 2013 workshop. The conversations and insights gained from the interviews and workshop provided guidance on the structure and content of this monograph.

Finally, the authors thank the members of the NAE Advisory Committee, the research team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), and the NAE project staff for their valuable contributions to the project. The report was very thoughtfully edited by Cameron Fletcher.

This monograph was subject to a confidential review in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments to the authors to assist in making this publication as sound as possible. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential. We thank the following individuals for their review of this monograph:

Jared Cohon, president emeritus and university professor, Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

James Duderstadt, president emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering, University of Michigan

Karan Watson, provost and executive vice president, Texas A&M University

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the opinions or conclusions of the authors nor did they see the final draft of the publication before its release. Responsibility for its final content rests entirely with the authors.

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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FOREWORD

Robust innovation in the United States is key to a strong and competitive industry and workforce. But America is facing an innovation challenge. To remain a leader in the global marketplace, the United States must significantly enhance its innovation capacities and abilities among both individuals and organizations. Innovation capability should be a new indicator of US workforce readiness to compete successfully in the global economy.

A new educational paradigm is needed to help current and future American workers remain competitive. Corporate and national educational strategies should create opportunities for students and workers to develop their ability to innovate. Academic environments, from the earliest ages through continuing education, can be improved—and even designed—to enhance this ability. Universities, in particular, should be leaders in the drive to improve US innovation. Companies also have a role to play, through thoughtful attention to their culture, inclusiveness, and workspace design as well as partnerships with local schools and universities.

The aim of the Educate to Innovate project is to expand and improve the innovative capacity of individuals and organizations by identifying critical skills, attributes, and best practices—indeed, cultures—for nurturing them. The project findings will enable educators in industry and at all levels of academia to cultivate the next generation of American innovators and thus ensure that the US workforce remains highly competitive in the face of rapid technological changes.

C. D. Mote, Jr.
President
National Academy of Engineering

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
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Robust innovation in the United States is key to a strong and competitive industry and workforce. Efforts to improve the capacity of individuals and organizations to innovate must be a high national priority to ensure that the United States remains a leader in the global economy. How is the United States preparing its students and workers to innovate and excel? What skills and attributes need to be nurtured?

The aim of the Educate to Innovate project is to expand and improve the innovative capacity of individuals and organizations by identifying critical skills, attributes, and best practices - indeed, cultures - for nurturing them. The project findings will enable educators in industry and at all levels of academia to cultivate the next generation of American innovators and thus ensure that the U.S. workforce remains highly competitive in the face of rapid technological changes. Educate to Innovate summarizes the keynote and plenary presentations from a workshop convened in October 2013. The workshop brought together innovators and leaders from various fields to share insights on innovation and its education. This report continues on to describe the specific skills, experiences, and environments that contribute to the success of innovators, and suggests next steps based on discussion from the workshop.

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