National Academies Press: OpenBook

Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders (2015)

Chapter: Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis

« Previous: Appendix D: Workshop Participant Bios
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

Appendix E
OTHER INFORMATION DESIRED FROM THE INTERVIEW ANALYSIS

The workshop participants were asked what more they would like to learn from the interview analysis. The following notes may suggest directions for future research in this area and would inform the next phase of the project that focuses on understanding how to build environments for educating to innovate.

  • What were the innovators’ views on how to actually teach innovation?
  • What about the licensing model? It doesn’t create growth development or job creation.
  • Have a forum to hear the long version of President Mote’s talk.
  • At what time in people’s lives do they become innovators?
  • What are very specific examples of experiences that made them innovators?
  • What impeded their becoming an innovator? (It seems as though many became innovators in spite of their education.)
  • Provide information about experiences when a teacher rewarded or appreciated their giving an answer or explanation that was different from what the teacher expected. Then look at the variety of their examples and infer what teachers do that models innovative thinking.
  • Look at when people had experiences to play and explore without a predetermined outcome. When did you hear that the process was valued, not just the outcome?
  • How did people learn through their failures?
  • Balance teaching the fundamentals with processing and manipulation time.
  • For the categories (skills, experience, environments), how did each affect their process for innovating?
  • Why did classmates fall to the wayside and they themselves bloomed?
  • What cultures are the most fruitful for innovation, for learning to learn? What learning experiences had the most impact?
  • Ask them to watch or listen to other innovators’ interviews or transcripts. What two or three things, as you listen to the other innovator(s), ring true?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
  • Are there patterns in upbringing, parents, living arrangements, and the role of noncurricular activities in students’ lives?
  • Add “culture” as a category. A participant says she would not be as successful as an entrepreneur if she were working in another company environment; the specific culture is important, she says.
  • What is the significance of individual actions and experiences as distinct from group experiences? How did each of these settings figure into different parts of their development?
  • How did they break paradigms? How were they iconoclastic?
  • How did they feel among their peers socially? Did they perceive themselves to be popular? Test the hypothesis that the really popular people may not be the iconoclasts, innovators, or future entrepreneurs.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 82
Next: Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios »
Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $31.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Robust innovation in the United States is key to a strong and competitive industry and workforce. Efforts to improve the capacity of individuals and organizations to innovate must be a high national priority to ensure that the United States remains a leader in the global economy. How is the United States preparing its students and workers to innovate and excel? What skills and attributes need to be nurtured?

The aim of the Educate to Innovate project is to expand and improve the innovative capacity of individuals and organizations by identifying critical skills, attributes, and best practices - indeed, cultures - for nurturing them. The project findings will enable educators in industry and at all levels of academia to cultivate the next generation of American innovators and thus ensure that the U.S. workforce remains highly competitive in the face of rapid technological changes. Educate to Innovate summarizes the keynote and plenary presentations from a workshop convened in October 2013. The workshop brought together innovators and leaders from various fields to share insights on innovation and its education. This report continues on to describe the specific skills, experiences, and environments that contribute to the success of innovators, and suggests next steps based on discussion from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!