National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix E: Other Information Desired from the Interview Analysis
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

Appendix F
STEERING COMMITTEE BIOS

Arden Bement, Jr. (NAE), Chair – Purdue University

Bement was director of the National Science Foundation from 2004 to 2010 and before that director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. At Purdue University, he is the inaugural director (emeritus) of the Global Policy Research Institute and David A. Ross Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering. His 39-year career in industry, government, and academia includes service as vice president of technical resources and of science and technology for TRW Inc., deputy under secretary of defense for research and engineering, director of DARPA’s Office of Materials Science, and professor of nuclear materials at MIT. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science, he has been awarded the Order of the Rising Sun from the Empire of Japan and Chevalier dans l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur from the French Republic.

John Seely Brown – Deloitte Center for the Edge/University of Southern California

Brown is the independent cochair of the Deloitte Center for the Edge and a visiting scholar and advisor to the provost at USC. He holds seven honorary doctorates from various prestigious universities, was inducted into the Industry Hall of Fame, and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Part scientist, part artist, and part strategist, he sees himself as the “Chief of Confusion, helping people ask the right questions, trying to make a difference through [his] work—speaking, writing, and teaching.” He was previously chief scientist of Xerox Corporation and director of its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) for nearly two decades. He cofounded the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL) and is interested in digital youth culture, digital media, and institutional innovation. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and of AAAS, and a trustee of Brown University and the MacArthur Foundation. He also serves on numerous public boards (Amazon, Corning, Varian Medical Systems, and Polycom) and private boards of directors.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

Jared Cohon (NAE) – Carnegie Mellon University

Cohon is president emeritus and university professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). As president (1997–2013), he guided CMU’s global expansion and led its efforts in diversity, technology, international education, and economic development in southwest Pennsylvania. He was previously dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University, and was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering. President Clinton appointed him to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board in 1995 and appointed him chairman in 1997. In 2002 President George W. Bush appointed Cohon to the Homeland Security Advisory Council, and in 2009 he was reappointed by President Obama.

Nicholas Donofrio (NAE) – IBM (ret.)

Donofrio is an IBM Fellow and a 44-year IBM veteran who retired as IBM’s Executive Vice President of Innovation and Technology. He was also vice chair of the IBM International Foundation and chair of the board of governors for the IBM Academy of Technology. Outside of IBM, he has been dedicated to education and career advancement for underrepresented minorities and women. He was board chair of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) from 1997 through 2002, and was on the board of directors for INROADS, a nonprofit that trains and helps minority youth for careers in business and industry. In 2003 he was awarded the Rodney D. Chipps Memorial Award by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). He cochairs the New York Hall of Science. He led the work of the Council on Competitiveness in its National Innovation Initiative (NII), which was the basis for the America Competes Act. In 2005 he was appointed to the Commission of the Future of Higher Education by the US Department of Education. He is a fellow of the IEEE, Royal Academy of Engineering, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and serves on the boards of directors for the Bank of New York/Mellon, Liberty Mutual, Delphi Automotive, AMD, and MITRE. He was a senior fellow at the Kauffman Foundation (2009–2012) and cochair of the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board (2009–2012).

James Duderstadt (NAE) – University of Michigan

Duderstadt is president emeritus and university professor of science and engineering at the University of Michigan. He has served on or chaired numerous public and private boards, including the National Science Board and the National Commission on the Future of Higher Education. He currently serves on major national boards and study commissions on federal science policy, higher education, information technology, energy sciences, and national security, including the NSF Advisory Committee on Cyberinfrastructure, the Glion Colloquium in Switzerland, and the Intelligence Science Board. He has received numerous national awards for his research, teaching, and service, including the E.O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching, the Reginald Wilson Award for national leadership in achieving diversity, and the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

Krisztina “Z” Holly – City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office

Holly serves as entrepreneur-in-residence for the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office and chairs the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council for fostering entrepreneurship. She was the creator and curator of the first TEDx event, vice provost for innovation at USC, and founding executive director of the MIT Deshpande Center, which helped spin out 39 startups based on university research and enhanced the entrepreneurial ecosystems of Boston and Los Angeles. Early on she was cofounder of computer telephony pioneer Stylus Innovation (acquired by Artisoft, Inc.) and subsequently joined other tech and media startups, including Direct Hit Technologies (acquired by Ask Jeeves). She has also worked in documentary film production and on engineering projects including the space shuttle main engine, a head-eye robot for the MIT artificial intelligence laboratory, and the first full-color computer-generated reflection hologram at the MIT Media Lab. Named Champion of Free Enterprise by Forbes in 2010, her work has appeared in the Economist, BusinessWeek, strategy+business, Huffington Post, CNN.com, Big Think, Science Progress, NASA Ask, and Mountain Bike Magazine. She has been active in board and advisory roles, including the US National Advisory Council for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

C. D. Mote, Jr. (NAE) – National Academy of Engineering

Mote served on the steering committee until he began his term as president of the National Academy of Engineering on July 1, 2013. He is also a Regents’ Professor on leave from the University of Maryland, College Park. He cochaired the Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Workforce Needs for the US Department of Defense and the US Industrial Base and was a member of the NRC committee that authored the Rising Above the Gathering Storm reports of 2005 and 2010. He has received the NAE Founders Award, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Medal, and the Humboldt Prize of the Federal Republic of Germany. At the University of California, Berkeley, he was honored with the Distinguished Teaching Award and Excellence in Achievement Award. He is an honorary fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Academy of Mechanics, Acoustical Society of America, and American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Gail Naughton – Histogen, Inc.

Naughton is the founder (in 2007), chair, and chief executive officer of Histogen, Inc. Before that she was vice chair, president, chief operating officer, and cofounder and director (since its inception in 1991) of Advanced Tissue Sciences, Inc. (ATS) (human-based tissue engineering). She is on the board of multiple committees of C.R. Bard, Inc., has conducted extensive research and authored numerous scientific publications, and holds more than 95 US and foreign patents. She also has a distinguished academic career, having served as dean of the San Diego State University College of Business Administration and on the boards of several academic institutions, nonprofit organizations, and foundations. Naughton was the first woman to receive the National Inventor of the Year award (in 2000) from the Intellectual Property Owners Association.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×

Lydia Villa-Komaroff – Cytonome

Villa-Komaroff, chief scientific officer at Cytonome, has had a 20-year research career spanning positions at MIT, Harvard University, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Harvard Medical School. She also previously served as vice president for research at Northwestern University, and vice president for research and chief operating officer of Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. She was elected to the AAAS board of directors and chaired the board of directors of Transkaryotic Therapies. A pioneer in the field of cloning, she has overcome both racial and gender inequality in higher education, eventually becoming the third Mexican American woman in the United States to receive a doctorate in the sciences. In addition to several honorary degrees, Villa-Komaroff has received the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award (1992) and the Women Entrepreneurs in Science & Technology (WEST) leadership award (2001), and in 2008 she was named National Hispanic Scientist of the Year by the Museum of Science and Industry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Steering Committee Bios." National Academy of Engineering. 2015. Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21698.
×
Page 86
Next: Appendix G: Project Team Bios »
Educate to Innovate: Factors That Influence Innovation: Based on Input from Innovators and Stakeholders Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $31.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Robust innovation in the United States is key to a strong and competitive industry and workforce. Efforts to improve the capacity of individuals and organizations to innovate must be a high national priority to ensure that the United States remains a leader in the global economy. How is the United States preparing its students and workers to innovate and excel? What skills and attributes need to be nurtured?

The aim of the Educate to Innovate project is to expand and improve the innovative capacity of individuals and organizations by identifying critical skills, attributes, and best practices - indeed, cultures - for nurturing them. The project findings will enable educators in industry and at all levels of academia to cultivate the next generation of American innovators and thus ensure that the U.S. workforce remains highly competitive in the face of rapid technological changes. Educate to Innovate summarizes the keynote and plenary presentations from a workshop convened in October 2013. The workshop brought together innovators and leaders from various fields to share insights on innovation and its education. This report continues on to describe the specific skills, experiences, and environments that contribute to the success of innovators, and suggests next steps based on discussion from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!