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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Daniel C. Barth-Jones, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an infectious disease epidemiologist who specializes in computer simulation of the transmission and public health control of HIV and other infectious disease epidemics. His primary research interests include the epidemiology of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, theoretical population vaccinology, Phase III HIV vaccine trial design, and health economic evaluations of public health policies for vaccination and preventative intervention programs. Dr. Barth-Jones is also a nationally recognized expert in the area of statistical disclosure analysis and control, where his work focuses on the development of statistical and geospatial disclosure control methodologies to help ensure the confidentiality and privacy of health care data in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. He has given scientific presentations and conducted educational training on HIPAA privacy regulations to numerous health care information organizations, health care delivery organizations, and state and federal agencies and organizations and within academia. He has an M.P.H. and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D., DABT, ATS, became director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), one of the institutes of the National Institutes of Health, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in 2009. She is the first toxicologist and the first woman to lead NIEHS and NTP. In these roles, Dr. Birnbaum oversees federal funding for biomedical research to discover how the environment influences human health and disease. She has spent most of her career as a federal scientist. Her research and many of her publications focus on the pharmacokinetic behavior of environmental chemicals; the mechanisms of actions of toxicants, including endocrine disruption; and the linking of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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real-world exposures to health effects. Dr. Birnbaum has received numerous awards and recognitions, including being elected to the National Academy of Medicine in October 2010. She also finds time to mentor the next generation of environmental health scientists as adjunct professor in the Gillings School of Global Public Health, the Curriculum in Toxicology, and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as in the Integrated Toxicology Program at Duke University.

Jerry Blancato, Ph.D., has been with the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since joining EPA in 1985. He came to EPA after teaching for 10 years in Delaware. Dr. Blancato initially worked in what is now the National Center for Environmental Assessment in Washington, DC, researching and applying new methods for extrapolating doses between species. In 1989 he joined what is now the National Environmental Research Laboratory (NERL) in Las Vegas, Nevada, specializing in developing physiological pharmacokinetic models for use in exposure and risk assessment. After several years as a researcher, he became branch chief in 1997, acting division director in 2001, and acting associate director of gealth for NERL in 2004. He accepted a permanent position as the deputy director of the National Center for Computational Toxicology in 2005. In March 2009, he became the acting director of the Office of Administrative and Research Support. In July 2012, he became the acting director of the Office of Science Information Management (OSIM), and in September 2013 he was selected as OSIM’s permanent director. He has served on numerous agency, interagency, and ORD committees, work groups, and task forces. In 2006 and 2007 he was cochair of the Information Technology Improvement Project and worked with numerous managers and staff members during the reorganization that eventually led to the formation of OSIM. Dr. Blancato has a bachelor’s of science in chemistry, a master’s of science in pathology, and a doctorate in biomedical engineering specializing in pharmacokinetic modeling.

Greg Bond, Ph.D., M.P.H., adjunct professor in the Department of Environmental Health in the University of Michigan School of Public Health, is a member of the team that is developing and delivering programming for the University of Michigan’s Dow Sustainability Fellows Program, which will develop and support 300 sustainability scholars over the first 6 years of the program. Dr. Bond is on loan to the University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

Michigan from the Dow Chemical Company, where he most recently served as corporate director of product responsibility. Dr. Bond has published more than 60 peer-reviewed journal articles on epidemiology research and product stewardship. In 1988, he was elected a fellow in the American College of Epidemiology. He has served as an adviser to various government agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the National Cancer Institute, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registries, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and others. Dr. Bond currently cochairs the International Council of Chemical Association’s Chemicals Policy and Health Leadership Group, which is working to improve the product safety performance of the global chemical industry and its reputation and strengthen science and risk-based chemicals management legislation and regulation throughout the world. Dr. Bond has a Ph.D. in epidemiology and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan.

Julia G. Brody, Ph.D., is a leader in research on breast cancer and the environment and in community-based research and public engagement in science. Dr. Brody’s current research focuses on methods for reporting to people on their own exposures to hormone disrupters and other emerging contaminants when the health effects are uncertain. She recently led a project connecting breast cancer advocacy and environmental justice in a study of household exposures to endocrine disrupters and air pollutants through a collaboration of Silent Spring Institute, Communities for a Better Environment (a California-based environmental justice organization), and researchers at Brown University and the University of California, Berkeley. Since 1996, Dr. Brody has been the principal investigator of the Cape Cod Breast Cancer and Environment Study, a case-control study of 2,100 women that includes testing for 89 endocrine disrupters in homes and historical exposure mapping. Dr. Brody’s research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the New York Community Trust, and the Avon Foundation, among others. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognized her research with an Environmental Merit Award in 2000, and she has been honored by the Heroes Tribute of the Breast Cancer Fund. She serves on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council, to which she was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and she is as an adviser to the California Breast Cancer Research Program and breast cancer activist organizations. Dr. Brody is an adjunct assistant professor at the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

Brown University School of Medicine. She earned a Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin and an A.B. at Harvard University.

Kevin Casey, J.D., is associate vice president for public affairs and communications, and is responsible for the day-to-day administrative operations of the Department of Public Affairs and Communications and all of Harvard’s government relations activities in Washington, DC. He also oversees representations on Harvard’s behalf to the state of Massachusetts in regulatory and legislative matters. He specializes in legislative and regulatory issues relating to basic research, intellectual property, technology transfer, and many miscellaneous matters, including immigration policy. He has been with Harvard since April 1989. Prior to joining Harvard, Mr. Casey served as the Boston office chief of staff to Massachusetts Congressman Edward J. Markey. Earlier Mr. Casey was the staff director of the Massachusetts State Legislature’s Joint Committee on Commerce and Labor. Mr. Casey is a graduate of Merrimack College and the New England School of Law and was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar in 1989.

Gwen Collman, Ph.D., leads approximately 60 professional staff in areas of scientific program administration, peer review, and the management and administration of about 1,500 active grants each year. She directs scientific activities across the field of environmental health sciences, including basic sciences (i.e., DNA repair, epigenetics, environmental genomics), organ-specific toxicology (i.e., reproductive toxicology, neurotoxicology, respiratory toxicology), public health–related programs (i.e., environmental epidemiology, environmental public health), and training and career development. She also oversees the implementation of the Superfund Research Program and the Worker Education and Training Program. Prior to her current role, Dr. Collman served in program development and management, beginning in 1992 as a member and then as chief of the Susceptibility and Population Health Branch. During this time, she directed research on the role of genetic and environmental factors on the development of human disease, from animal models of genetic susceptibility to population studies focusing on etiology and intervention. She was responsible for building the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) grant portfolio in environmental and molecular epidemiology and developed several complex multidisciplinary research programs. These include the NIEHS Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers Program, the NIEHS-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Centers for Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Pre-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

vention, and the Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative. Also, under her guidance, a team created a vision for the Partnerships for Environmental Public Health programs for the next decade.

Louis Anthony (Tony) Cox, Jr., Ph.D., is president of Cox Associates, a Denver, Colorado-based applied research company specializing in quantitative risk analysis, causal modeling, advanced analytics, and operations research. Since 1986, Cox Associates’ mathematicians and scientists have applied computer simulation and biomathematical models, statistical and epidemiological risk analyses, causal data mining techniques, and operations research and artificial intelligence models to measurably improve health, business, and engineering risk analysis and decision making for public- and private-sector clients. Since 1996, its sister company, NetAdvantage, has provided operations research services and software for telecommunications companies. He is also the chief sciences officer for NextHealth Technologies, a health care analytics software a service platform and services provider that leverages big data and prescriptive analytics to recommend, manage, and optimize consumer engagement. In 2006, Cox Associates was inducted into the Edelman Academy of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science, which recognizes outstanding real-world achievements in the practice of operations research and the management sciences. In 2012, Dr. Cox was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications and a member of the Academies’ Standing Committee on the Use of Public Health Data in Food Safety and Inspection Service food safety programs. Dr. Cox holds a Ph.D. in risk analysis and an S.M. in operations research, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an A.B. from Harvard University and is a graduate of the Stanford Executive Program.

George Daston, Ph.D., is a Victor Mills Society Research Fellow at the Procter & Gamble Company. His current research efforts are in the areas of toxicogenomics and mechanistic toxicology, particularly in addressing how findings in these fields can improve risk assessment for chemicals and the development of nonanimal alternatives to testing. He has published more than 100 articles and book chapters and edited 5 books in toxicology and risk assessment. Dr. Daston has served as president of the Teratology Society, as councilor of the Society of Toxicology, on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and the National Children’s Study Advisory Committee. He is editor in chief of Birth Defects Research: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology. Dr. Daston manages the AltTox website, which is devoted to the exchange of scientific information leading to the development of in vitro replacements for toxicity assessments. Dr. Daston has been awarded the Josef Warkany Lectureship by the Teratology Society and the George H. Scott Award by the Toxicology Forum and was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Daston is an adjunct professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati.

Francesca Dominici, Ph.D., is senior associate dean for research and professor of biostatistics at the Harvard University School of Public Health. Dr. Dominici has authored more than 120 peer-reviewed publications. Her research has focused on the development of statistical methods for the analysis of large observational data with the ultimate goal of addressing important questions in environmental health science, the health-related impacts of climate change, and comparative effectiveness research. She is an expert in Bayesian methods, longitudinal data analysis, confounding adjustment, causal inference, and Bayesian hierarchical models. She has extensive experience with the development of statistical methods and their applications to environmental epidemiology, implementation science and health policy, outcomes research and patient safety, and comparative effectiveness research. Dr. Dominici received a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Padua, Italy. During her Ph.D. studies, she spent 2 years as a visiting student at Duke University. Afterward, she attended the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University as a postdoctoral fellow.

Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., is a world-renowned epidemiologist, pediatrician, educator, and former regulator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She was named dean of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, as it was known then in 2010. In 2014, she assumed the Michael and Lori Milken Dean of Public Health at the newly renamed Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Her areas of focus are public health practice, children’s environmental health, disaster preparedness, and chemical and pesticide regulatory policy. As

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

assistant administrator for toxic substances at EPA, she directed the Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances from 1993 through 1998. Prior to joining EPA, Dr. Goldman served as chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control of the California Department of Health Services. Dr. Goldman has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Committee. Dr. Goldman is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, vice chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, and a member of the Academies’ Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews.

George Gray, Ph.D., has long been committed to the effective use of science to inform public health choices in both academic and policy-making settings, and emphasizes the importance of effectively communicating those choices to citizens, journalists, and lawmakers. Prior to joining George Washington University in 2010, Dr. Gray served as assistant administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Research and Development and as the Agency’s science adviser, promoting scientific excellence in EPA research, advocating for the continuing evolution of the Agency’s approach to analysis, and encouraging programs that provide academic research to support EPA’s mission. His areas of focus included nanotechnology, ecosystem research, the influence of toxicology advances on testing and risk assessment, and sustainability. From 2001 to 2005, Dr. Gray was executive director of the Harvard University Center for Risk Analysis and a member of the faculty at the Harvard University School of Public Health. In addition to teaching, he applied the tools of risk analysis to public health problems ranging from mad cow disease to pesticides in food and the risks and benefits of fish consumption. He has an M.S. in toxicology and a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Daniel Greenbaum, M.S., joined the Health Effects Institute (HEI) as president and chief executive officer in 1994. In that role, Greenbaum leads HEI’s efforts, supported jointly by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Highway Administration, the U.S.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

Agency for International Development, the Asian Development Bank, and foundations, to provide public and private decision makers with high-quality, impartial, relevant, and credible science about the health effects of air pollution. Mr. Greenbaum has focused HEI’s efforts on providing timely and critical research and reanalysis on particulate matter, air toxics, diesel exhaust, and alternative technologies and fuels. Mr. Greenbaum currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Health, Environmental, and Other External Costs and Benefits of Energy Production and Consumption. He has been a member of the Academies Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and vice-chair of its Committee for Air Quality Management in the United States. Mr. Greenbaum also chaired the EPA Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline, which issued the report Achieving Clean Air and Clean Water, and EPA’s Clean Diesel Independent Review Panel, which reviewed technology progress in implementing the 2007 Highway Diesel Rule. Before coming to HEI, he was commissioner of environmental protection in Massachusetts.

John Howard, M.D., M.P.H., J.D., LL.M., serves as the director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, DC. He served in this capacity from July 2002 to July 2008 and was reappointed in September 2009. Prior to his appointment as director of NIOSH, Dr. Howard served as chief of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health in the California Department of Industrial Relations from 1991 through 2002. Dr. Howard is board certified in internal medicine and occupational medicine. He is admitted to the practice of medicine and law in the state of California and in the District of Columbia, and he is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court bar. He has written numerous articles on occupational health law and policy. Dr. Howard received a doctor of medicine degree from Loyola University of Chicago, a master’s of public health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health, a doctor of law degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a master of law in administrative law from the George Washington University.

Bernard Lo, M.D., was professor of medicine and director of the program in medical ethics at the University of California, San Francisco, before becoming president of The Greenwall Foundation. Currently he cochairs the Standards Working Group of the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, which recommends regulations for stem cell

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

research funded by the state of California. At the National Institutes of Health (NIH), he serves on Data and Safety Monitoring Committees for HIV vaccine trials and the Long-Term Oxygen Treatment Trial. Dr. Lo serves on the board of directors of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs and on the Medical Advisory Panel of Blue Cross/Blue Shield. He was formerly a member of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission under President Bill Clinton, the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and the Ethics Subcommittee, and the Advisory Committee to the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has written articles on ethical issues in the procurement of embryos for research, oversight of stem cell lines derived in other institutions, informed consent for future research, and prohibiting the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for reproductive cloning. Dr. Lo is the author of Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians (5th ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013) and of Ethical Issues in Clinical Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010). A member of the National Academy of Medicine, Dr. Lo served on the National Academy of Medicine Council and chaired the Board on Health Sciences Policy. He chaired National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees on conflicts of interest in medicine and on confidentiality in health services research and has been a member of several other Academies committees. He is currently a member of the Board on Life Sciences of the Academies.

Frank Loy, LL.B., has served in the U.S. Department of State in four administrations. He served as Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs in the second administration of President Bill Clinton. His portfolio included developing U.S. international policy and conducting negotiations in the fields of the environment and climate change, human rights, the promotion of democracy, refugees and humanitarian affairs, and counternarcotics. Under President Jimmy Carter he was director of the Bureau of Refugee Programs with the personal rank of ambassador, and in the Lyndon Johnson Administration he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Affairs. In 2011 President Barack Obama named him the U.S. Alternate Representative to the United Nations General Assembly. At present he serves on the boards of numerous nonprofit organizations. In the field of the environment these include Resources for the Future (former chair), the Environmental Defense Fund (former chair), The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, and ecoAmerica (chair). He also chairs the boards of Population Services International and the Arthur Burns

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

Fellowship Program and serves on the boards of the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies and The Washington Ballet.

Alan B. Morrison, LL.B., is the Lerner Family Associate Dean for Public Interest & Public Service at the George Washington University Law School. Morrison graduated from Yale University and the Harvard University Law School. He also worked as an assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York. For most of his career he was with the Public Citizen Litigation, which he cofounded with Ralph Nader and directed for many years. He has taught administrative law and other subjects at Harvard, New York University, Stanford University, the University of Hawaii, and American University law schools. He is a senior fellow of the Administrative Conference of the United State and a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Science, Technology, and Law.

Glenn Paulson, Ph.D., is co-chair of the Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability of the National Science and Technology Council, an operating unit of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Paulson has more than 40 years’ experience in environmental science, technology, and policy issues in the public, private, and academic sectors. He served three terms on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board and has been a member of many federal government advisory committees, including a charter member of the U.S. Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board and the first chair of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Advisory Board. In his current position as science adviser to the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Dr. Paulson provides expertise on a wide variety of scientific issues relevant to Agency decisions. He also chairs the cross-agency Science and Technology Policy Council, which is made up of high-level managers from across EPA. The Council deals with issues such as the Laboratory Enterprise Study, responses to recommendations from Academies reports, technology innovation, sustainability, and improving risk assessment methods and approaches, as well as environmental measurement, modeling, and monitoring. Dr. Paulson also serves as EPA’s acting scientific integrity official and leads the implementation of EPA’s policy on scientific integrity. He is also responsible for overseeing EPA’s compliance with the requirements for human subjects research.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

Joseph V. Rodricks, Ph.D., DABT, is a founding principal of ENVIRON and an internationally recognized expert in toxicology and risk analysis. He has consulted for hundreds of manufacturers, government agencies, and the World Health Organization in the evaluation of health risks associated with human exposure to chemical substances of all types. Dr. Rodricks came to consulting after a 15-year career as a scientist at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In his last 4 years at FDA, he served as associate commissioner for health affairs. His experience extends from pharmaceuticals, medical devices, consumer products, and foods to occupational chemicals and environmental contaminants. He has served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and on 30 boards and committees of the Academies, including the committees that produced the seminal works Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process (1983) and Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment (2009). He has published nearly 150 scientific publications and has received honorary awards from 3 professional societies for his contributions to toxicology and risk analysis. He is author of the widely used text Calculated Risks, now in its second edition, published by Cambridge University Press.

Ellen Silbergeld, Ph.D., trained at Johns Hopkins University in geography and environmental engineering and is a postdoctoral fellow in environmental health sciences. She had a staff fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) followed by senior scientist position at Environmental Defense Fund and a professorship at the University of Maryland Medical School. She has served as scientific adviser to the National Toxicology Program of NIH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the states of Maryland and New York, the World Bank, the International Labour Organization, the United Nations Environment Programme, and the Pan American Health Organization. Her research and professional activities bridge science and public policy and a focus on the incorporation of mechanistic toxicology into environmental and occupational health policy. Areas of current focus include the cardiovascular risks of arsenic, lead, and cadmium; the immunotoxicity of mercury compounds; and the health and environmental impacts of industrial food animal production. These projects include epidemiological studies and mechanistic research on gene–environment interactions and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×

the movement of pathogens in the environment. Some of this research is conducted internationally (mercury studies in the Amazon; lead/cadmium/arsenic studies in Mexico; mining and development studies in Mongolia; zoonotic disease studies in Thailand and the Netherlands). She also directs a Fogarty Training Program in noncommunicable diseases, which is a collaboration between Johns Hopkins University and the School of Public Health of Mongolia.

Edward J. Sondik, Ph.D., is director of the National Center for Health Statistics, directing personnel located in two locations: in Hyattsville, Maryland, outside Washington, DC, and in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. He served as director since joining the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1997. Dr. Sondik has also served as the acting director of the National Center for Public Health Informatics and as acting director to co-lead the Coordinating Center for Health Information and Service until a candidate was named. Dr. Sondik’s background is in mathematics and statistics and the discipline of operations research and has academic training in electrical engineering on the side of control systems, computers, and operations research. Dr. Sondik received a Ph.D. at Stanford University. It was there that he was given the opportunity to work with the Stanford Medical School to redesign the Stanford Hospital. He also taught at the university.

Latanya Sweeney, Ph.D., is professor of government and technology in residence at Harvard University and director and founder of the Data Privacy Lab, now at Harvard University. Prior to this she was a distinguished career professor of computer science, technology, and policy in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Sweeney’s work involves creating technologies and related policies with guarantees of privacy protection while allowing society to collect and share person-specific information for many worthy purposes. Her work has received awards from numerous organizations, including the American Psychiatric Association, the American Medical Informatics Association, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Dr. Sweeney received a Ph.D. in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2001, being the first black woman to do so. Her undergraduate degree in computer science was from Harvard University.

Paul R. Verkuil, J.S.D., the 10th chairman of the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS), was sworn in by Vice President

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Joe Biden on April 6, 2010. The Conference was revived by Congress in 2009 after a 15-year hiatus. President Barack Obama named the 10-member Council on July 8, 2010, saying, “ACUS is a public–private partnership designed to make government work better.” The 50 government and 40 public members, along with the council and chair, form the 101-member Conference. The Conference meets twice per year in June and December in plenary sessions to make consensus-driven recommendations to improve government processes and procedures. Mr. Verkuil is a well-known administrative law teacher and scholar who has coauthored a leading treatise, Administrative Law and Process, now in its fifth edition; several other books (most recently, Outsourcing Sovereignty, Cambridge University Press, 2007); and more than 65 articles on the general topic of public law and regulation. He is president emeritus of the College of William & Mary, former dean of the Tulane and Cardozo Law Schools, and a faculty member at the University of North Carolina Law School. He is a graduate of the College of William & Mary and the University of Virginia Law School and holds a J.S.D. from New York University Law School. He is a life member of the American Law Institute and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21703.
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Page 102
Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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On March 19, 2014, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop on the topic of the sharing of data from environmental health research. Experts in the field of environmental health agree that there are benefits to sharing research data, but questions remain regarding how to effectively make these data available. The sharing of data derived from human subjects--making them both transparent and accessible to others--raises a host of ethical, scientific, and process questions that are not always present in other areas of science, such as physics, geology, or chemistry. The workshop participants explored key concerns, principles, and obstacles to the responsible sharing of data used in support of environmental health research and policy making while focusing on protecting the privacy of human subjects and addressing the concerns of the research community. Principles and Obstacles for Sharing Data from Environmental Health Research summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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