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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
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Appendix A

Committee Biographies

Charles O. Holliday, Jr. (Chair) is chairman of Royal Dutch Shell, PLC. He also is a director on the boards of HCA Holdings, Inc., and CH2M. He served as a director on the board of Deere & Company, 2007-2015; was a member of the board of directors for Bank of America, 2009-2015, serving as chairman, 2010-2014; and was a member of the board of directors for E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (DuPont), 1997-2009, serving as its chairman, 1999-2009, and as DuPont’s chief executive officer, 1998-2009. Mr. Holliday is chairman emeritus of Catalyst, a leading nonprofit organization dedicated to expanding opportunities for women and business, and chairman emeritus of the board of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness, a nonpartisan nongovernmental organization working to ensure U.S. prosperity. He is a founding member of the International Business Council, and previously served as chairman of the Business Roundtable’s Task Force for Environment, Technology and Economy; the World Business Council for Sustainable Development; the Business Council; and the Society of Chemical Industry American Section. Mr. Holliday has served on and chaired several committees of the National Academies, including the Committee on Research Universities, the Committee on America’s Climate Choices, the Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century, and the Roundtable on Scientific Communication and National Security. He is former chair of the National Academy of Engineering Council. Mr. Holliday received a B.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Tennessee and honorary doctorates from Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, New York, and Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. He is the author of Walking the Talk, a book that makes the business case for sustainable development and corporate responsibility.

Jerome Apt is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business and in the university’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy. He is co-director of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center and director of the RenewElec (renewable electricity) project. He has authored more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals, and has published op-ed pieces in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. His

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

recent publications address the mathematical characteristics and economics of wind, solar, and hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation. Prior to his work at Carnegie Mellon, he was a planetary astronomer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) astronaut on four Space Shuttle missions, director of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and managing director and chief technology officer of iNetworks LLC Venture Capital. Dr. Apt received the Metcalf Lifetime Achievement Award for significant contributions to engineering in 2002 and NASA’s Distinguished Service Medal in 1997. He has served on two committees of the National Academies: the Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program and the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs. Dr. Apt received an A.B. from Harvard College in 1971 and a Ph.D. in experimental atomic physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976.

Frances Beinecke is former president of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), one of the United States' most influential environmental advocacy organizations, which uses law and science to advance solutions to the nation’s environmental challenges. Under her leadership, the organization focused on establishing a clean energy future that curbs climate change, revives the world’s oceans, defends endangered wildlife and wild places, and ensures safe and sufficient water. President Obama appointed Ms. Beinecke to the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. She has played a leadership role in many environmental organizations and currently serves on the boards of the World Resources Institute, Climate Central, the Meridian Institute, and the NRDC Action Fund. Ms. Beinecke received a bachelor’s degree from Yale College and a master’s degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (FES). She is a member of the Leadership Council of the Yale School of Forestry and the Yale School of Management’s Advisory Board and is a former member of the Yale Corporation. She served as a McCluskey fellow at Yale FES in 2015. Ms. Beinecke has received the Rachel Carson Award from the National Audubon Society, the Aldo Leopold Award from Yale FES, and honorary degrees from Vermont Law School and Lehman College. She served on the National Academies’ Committee on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Safety Information from 1982 until 1984.

Nora Mead Brownell co-founded ESPY Energy Solutions, LLC, a women-owned business providing innovative and highly skilled consulting services. The company offers strategic planning, marketing, business, regulatory, and technical expertise to energy utilities, energy equipment manufacturing and supply companies, smart-grid manufacturers and service providers, and financial institutions evaluating investments in the energy sector. In 2001, President George W. Bush nominated and the U.S. Senate confirmed Ms. Brownell to be a commissioner to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), where

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

she served until 2006, with a focus on fostering competitive markets to serve the public interest and policies that promote investment in national energy infrastructure development. Previously, she served as a member of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC), 1997 to 2001, taking an active role in the rollout of electric choice in Pennsylvania. She also has actively supported Pennsylvania’s pursuit of competition in the local markets for telecommunications, deployment of advanced services, enhancement of services to rural areas, protection of consumers, and advancement of special services, helping to craft unique solutions to a number of these industry issues. In addition, Ms. Brownell is former president of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners. She currently serves on the boards of National Grid PLC, Tangent, and Spectra Energy Partners, having previously served on the boards of numerous for-profit and nonprofit organizations. At present, Ms. Brownell is serving on the advisory boards of Morgan Stanley Infrastructure, New World Capital, and TerViva. In addition, she has lectured at the Vermont Law School’s Center for Energy and the Environment, the Michigan State University Institute of Public Utilities, the University of Idaho, the H. John Heinz III College School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University, and the Wharton Energy Club, among others.

Paul Centolella is president of Paul Centolella & Associates and a senior consultant with Tabors Caramanis Rudkevich. In these roles, he advises electric utility and technology companies on business strategy and regulatory issues and government on emerging electric industry business and regulatory models. Mr. Centolella served as a commissioner on the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO), 2007-2012, overseeing a broad range of utility services and pursuing a regulatory strategy designed to take advantage of efficient power markets, advance innovation and grid modernization, improve utility asset utilization, enhance reliability, and provide customers with new tools for managing their energy needs. He has both public- and private-sector experience in regulation, economic and energy consulting, and public utility and environmental law, and also has background working with standards development and emerging technologies. During his 35-year career, Mr. Centolella has performed economic assessments of energy markets for power system operators and has analyzed policies related to energy pricing, investments, innovation, system reliability, and security. He has served on a range of energy-related working groups and task forces, and is a member of the Ohio, California, and Washington State Bar Associations; the American Economic Association; and the International Association for Energy Economics. Mr. Centolella holds a B.A. in economics from Oberlin College and a JD from the University of Michigan Law School.

David K. Garman, now retired, was most recently a principal and managing partner in the consulting firm Decker Garman Sullivan and Associates, LLC, a company with a client base that includes Fortune 500 companies, national

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

laboratories, universities, think tanks, and “greentech” startups. Previously, he served as under secretary of the Department of Energy, 2001-2007, overseeing a wide spectrum of applied energy research, development, and demonstration projects ranging from new types of nuclear power plants to clean coal technologies, hydrogen and fuel cell energy technologies, superconductivity, advanced vehicles, thin-film solar photovoltaic technologies, and others. In 2001, President George W. Bush nominated him to serve as assistant secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, which has the Department of Energy’s largest energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment portfolio. As assistant secretary, Mr. Garman was instrumental in the development of the FreedomCAR cooperative automotive research partnership and the President’s Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. In recognition of his role, he was awarded the National Hydrogen Association’s 2002 Meritorious Service Award and the Electric Drive Vehicle Association’s 2003 “E-Visionary” Award. He also served as chairman of the FreedomCAR Executive Steering Committee and as chairman of the Steering Committee for the 15-nation International Partnership for a Hydrogen Economy. He was twice awarded the Department of Energy’s highest award, the Secretary’s Gold Medal. Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Mr. Garman served in a variety of positions on the staff of two U.S. senators and two Senate committees during a career spanning nearly 21 years. He represented the Senate leadership at virtually all of the major negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 1995-2000. Mr. Garman holds a B.A. in public policy from Duke University and an M.S. in environmental sciences from The Johns Hopkins University.

Clark W. Gellings, an independent energy consultant, recently retired as a fellow at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), where he was responsible for technology strategy in areas concerning energy efficiency, demand response, renewable energy sources, and other clean technologies. He was named EPRI fellow in 2009, in recognition of his 28+ years of technical innovation and leadership. Mr. Gellings has made significant contributions to the development of demand-side management (DSM) and smart-grid research, among other technical areas. He pioneered smart-grid research when EPRI established its IntelliGrid research program in 1999. He has also conducted research in energy utilization, electrotechnologies, power quality, electric transportation, thermal and electrical energy storage, and renewables. From 1982 to 2009, Mr. Gellings served in seven vice president positions at EPRI. He has received a number of distinguished awards from various organizations. A licensed professional engineer, he has served on the National Academies’ Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Building and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the Energy Information Administration and Committee on Enhancing the Robustness and Resilience of Future Electrical Transmission and Distribution in the United States to Terrorist Attack. Mr. Gellings earned his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

B.S. in electrical engineering from Newark College of Engineering, then earned an M.S. in mechanical engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology and an M.S. in management science from the Stevens Institute of Technology.

Barton J. Gordon joined K&L Gates as partner in its Washington, DC, office after 26 years representing the state of Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives. During his congressional career, he was known as a bipartisan leader in innovation policy. As dean of Tennessee’s congressional delegation, he represented the Sixth District, 1985-2011. From 2007 through 2011, he was chairman of the House Science and Technology Committee, authoring the landmark bipartisan America COMPETES Act. That law created the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) within the Department of Energy, which is tasked with leveraging talent in private industry, universities, and government laboratories to develop next-generation energy sources and technologies. Additionally, he led the effort to enact the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which increased mileage standards, improved vehicle technology, promoted alternative energy research, and improved energy efficiency in a variety of ways. Mr. Gordon also served as a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and of three subcommittees: the Health Subcommittee; the Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection Subcommittee; and, the Communications, Technology, and the Internet Subcommittee. Prior to his public service, he was a lawyer in private practice. He earned his B.S. from Middle Tennessee State University and his JD from the University of Tennessee.

William W. Hogan is Raymond Plank professor of global energy policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and research director of the Harvard Electricity Policy Group (HEPG), which is exploring issues involved in the transition to a more competitive electricity market. His current research focuses on major energy industry restructuring, network pricing and access issues, market design, and energy policy in nations worldwide. Dr. Hogan has been a member of the faculty of Stanford University, where he founded the Energy Modeling Forum, and he is a past president of the International Association for Energy Economics. He has been actively engaged in the design and improvement of competitive electricity markets in many regions of the United States, as well as around the world. His activities include designing the market structures and market rules by which regional transmission organizations, in various forms, coordinate bid-based markets for energy, ancillary services, and financial transmission rights. This research is also part of the larger activities on the future of energy and energy policy research at Harvard University through the Environment and Natural Resources Policy Program, the Environmental Economics Program, Harvard University Center for the Environment, and Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government. Dr. Hogan received

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

his undergraduate degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy and his MBA and Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Richard K. Lester is Japan Steel Industry professor and associate provost for international activities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he oversees the Institute’s international engagements. From 2009 to 2015, he served as head of MIT’s Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. Dr. Lester’s research is concerned with innovation strategy and management, focusing most frequently on the energy and manufacturing sectors. He has led major studies of national and regional competitiveness and innovation performance commissioned by governments and industry groups around the world. He is the founding director and faculty chair of the MIT Industrial Performance Center. Dr. Lester is also widely known for his teaching and research on nuclear technology innovation, management, and control. He has been a long-time advocate of advanced nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies to improve the safety and economic performance of nuclear power, and his studies in the field of nuclear waste management helped provide the foundation for new institutional and technological strategies for dealing with this long-standing problem. Dr. Lester is the author or co-author of eight books, most recently Unlocking Energy Innovation: How America Can Build a Low-Cost, Low-Carbon Energy System (written with David Hart). He obtained his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Imperial College and his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from MIT. He has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1979. He serves as an advisor to governments, corporations, foundations, and nonprofit groups, and is chair of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy.

August W. Ritter was elected Colorado’s 41st governor in 2006. During his 4-year term, he established Colorado as a national and international leader in clean energy by building a new energy economy. After leaving the Governor’s Office, he founded the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University. The Center works with state and federal policy makers to create clean energy policy throughout the country. Governor Ritter authored the recently published Powering Forward: What Everyone Should Know about America’s Energy Revolution.

James Rogers served most recently as chairman of the board for Duke Energy, having been elected in 2007. He also served as Duke Energy’s president and CEO from 2006 until his retirement in 2013, following the company’s merger with Cinergy, where he had served as chairman and CEO. Previously, he was chairman, president, and CEO of PSI Energy. Mr. Rogers is currently a director of Cigna Corp. and Applied Materials Inc. In 2010 and 2011, he was named by the National Association of Corporate Directors’ Directorship magazine to its annual Directorship 100, recognizing the most influential people in corporate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

governance. He has advocated for investing in energy efficiency, modernizing the electric infrastructure, and pursuing advanced technologies to grow the economy and transition to a low-carbon future. Mr. Rogers serves as vice chairman of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. He was chairman of the Edison Electric Institute when it changed its position to support federal climate change legislation in 2007. He was also founding chairman of the Institute for Electric Efficiency, a board member of the Alliance to Save Energy, and co-chair of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. He serves on the boards of directors of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations and the World Association of Nuclear Operators and on the board of Duke University’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. He is a lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and in September 2011, United Nations Secretary-General Ban ki-Moon named him to a blue ribbon commission of business and nongovernmental organization leaders known as the High-Level Group on Sustainable Energy for All. Mr. Rogers attended Emory University and earned bachelor of business administration and JD degrees from the University of Kentucky.

Theodore Roosevelt, IV is a managing director in investment banking at Barclays, based in New York. Currently, he serves as chairman of the firm’s Clean Tech Initiative and is a co-chair of Barclays Military Services Network. Mr. Roosevelt joined Barclays in 2008 when it acquired the North American assets of Lehman Brothers, for which he began working as a general banker in domestic corporate finance in 1972. By 1984, he had been named a managing director, and in 1991, he was asked to focus on the development of the firm’s international business. He was elected chairman of the board of directors of Lehman Brothers Financial Products Inc. in 1994 and chairman of the board of directors of Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. in 1998. In February 2007, he was appointed chairman of the firm’s Council on Climate Change. Mr. Roosevelt received his A.B. from Harvard in 1965. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he joined the Department of State as a foreign service officer. In 1972, he received his MBA from Harvard Business School. Mr. Roosevelt is board chair of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, secretary of The Climate Reality Project, a member of the Governing Council of the Wilderness Society, and a trustee for the American Museum of Natural History. He was an advisory committee member on the MIT study The Future of Natural Gas and served on the advisory committee for the Council on Foreign Relations special report The Future of US Special Operations. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and The Economic Club of New York and a governor of the Foreign Policy Association. He is chairman emeritus of the National League of Conservation Voters and served as trustee for Trout Unlimited and World Resource Institute.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

Peter Rothstein is president of NECEC, which combines two sister nonprofit organizations—the Northeast Clean Energy Council, the lead voice for hundreds of clean energy companies across the Northeast, and NECEC Institute, a leader of programs in innovation and entrepreneurship and in industry research and development across the region. NECEC members and partners cut across dozens of cleantech sectors and stages, from start-ups to emerging companies and market segment leaders. NECEC is widely recognized for its regional innovation cluster initiatives, as well as stakeholder initiatives that bring together the region’s cleantech entrepreneurs, companies, and supporters to advance the regional clean energy economy. Mr. Rothstein has 30 years of experience in cleantech venture and high-tech markets. Previously, he was part of the Flagship Ventures team, a leading seed and early-stage venture capital firm. He also founded Allegro Strategy, serving as a consultant, advisor, and executive with early-stage cleantech start-ups. Mr. Rothstein has served in early-stage deal or executive roles with a number of cleantech companies and has been involved in a range of leading cleantech and entrepreneurial organizations. Earlier, he was an entrepreneur and executive in the software industry, including as a Lotus/IBM vice president of strategy and leader of an internal Lotus incubator accelerating knowledge management ventures. He holds a master’s degree from the MIT Sloan School of Management with a concentration in energy economics and a bachelor’s degree in environmental design from Clark University.

Gary Roughead served as the U.S. Navy’s 29th chief of naval operations after holding six operational commands. He is one of only two officers in the history of the Navy to have commanded both the U.S. Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. In retirement, Admiral Roughead is an Annenberg distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and serves on the boards of directors of the Northrop Grumman Corporation; Maersk Line, Limited; and the Center for a New American Security. He is a trustee of Dodge and Cox Funds and is on the board of managers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He advises companies in the national security and medical sectors.

Maxine L. Savitz is retired general manager for technology partnerships at Honeywell, Inc., (formerly AlliedSignal) and previously was general manager of AlliedSignal Ceramics Components. She was employed at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies from 1974 to 1983 and served as deputy assistant secretary for conservation. Dr. Savitz served two terms (2006-2014) as vice president of the National Academy of Engineering, and has served on numerous committees of the National Academies. She serves on the board of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy and on advisory bodies for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She also serves on the MIT visiting committee for sponsored research activities. In 2009, she was appointed to the President’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. In 2013, Dr. Savitz was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and she is also a fellow of the California Council on Science and Technology. Past board memberships include the National Science Board, Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Defense Science Board, Electric Power Research Institute, Draper Laboratories, and Energy Foundation. Dr. Savitz’s awards and honors include the Orton Memorial Lecturer Award (American Ceramic Society) (1998), the DOE Outstanding Service Medal (1981), the President’s Meritorious Rank Award (1980), recognition by the Engineering News Record for Contribution to Construction Industry (1979 and 1975), and the MERDC Commander Award for Scientific Excellence (1967). She is the author of about 20 publications. Dr. Savitz earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from MIT in 1961.

Mark Williams (deceased) served as a member of the executive committee and downstream director of Royal Dutch Shell PLC from 2009 to 2012. He had previously held the positions of executive vice president, global businesses, and vice president of strategy, portfolio and environment for oil products. In 2004, he was appointed executive vice president of supply and distribution in Shell Downstream Inc., a position he held through 2008. He joined Shell in 1979 for Shell Oil Exploration & Production in the United States. He also served as engineering manager for Shell Offshore Inc.; operations manager for Shell Western EP Inc.; head of EP staff planning and head of downstream strategy for Shell Oil Co.; and vice president transportation for Equilon Enterprises LLC, the Shell and Texaco joint venture in the United States. He was a member of the board of visitors of the McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, and a trustee of Carleton College. He also chaired the Downstream Committee of the American Petroleum Institute. Dr. Williams had been chairman of the board and independent director of Hess Corporation since May 2013. He had also served as chairman of the executive committee of the Athabasca Oil Sands Project and chairman of the Downstream Committee of the American Petroleum Institute. Dr. Williams held a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21712.
×
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Electricity, supplied reliably and affordably, is foundational to the U.S. economy and is utterly indispensable to modern society. However, emissions resulting from many forms of electricity generation create environmental risks that could have significant negative economic, security, and human health consequences. Large-scale installation of cleaner power generation has been generally hampered because greener technologies are more expensive than the technologies that currently produce most of our power. Rather than trade affordability and reliability for low emissions, is there a way to balance all three?

The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Energy Technologies considers how to speed up innovations that would dramatically improve the performance and lower the cost of currently available technologies while also developing new advanced cleaner energy technologies. According to this report, there is an opportunity for the United States to continue to lead in the pursuit of increasingly clean, more efficient electricity through innovation in advanced technologies. The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Energy Technologies makes the case that America’s advantages—world-class universities and national laboratories, a vibrant private sector, and innovative states, cities, and regions that are free to experiment with a variety of public policy approaches—position the United States to create and lead a new clean energy revolution. This study focuses on five paths to accelerate the market adoption of increasing clean energy and efficiency technologies: (1) expanding the portfolio of cleaner energy technology options; (2) leveraging the advantages of energy efficiency; (3) facilitating the development of increasing clean technologies, including renewables, nuclear, and cleaner fossil; (4) improving the existing technologies, systems, and infrastructure; and (5) leveling the playing field for cleaner energy technologies.

The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Energy Technologies is a call for leadership to transform the United States energy sector in order to both mitigate the risks of greenhouse gas and other pollutants and to spur future economic growth. This study’s focus on science, technology, and economic policy makes it a valuable resource to guide support that produces innovation to meet energy challenges now and for the future.

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