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Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
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B

Meeting Agendas

FIRST WORKSHOP ON THE TREATMENT OF CARDIAC ARREST: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Room 120
Washington, DC 20418

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Robert Graham, Committee Chair
Mickey Eisenberg, Committee Vice-Chair
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Discussion of the Charge to the Committee
Brian Eigel, American Heart Association
Jennifer Deibert, American Red Cross
David Lathrop, National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 – 3:15 p.m. Government-Related Activities About Cardiac Arrest
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
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Joseph Ornato, Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium
Robin Boineau, NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
Jeremy Brown, NIH Office of Emergency Care Research
Bryan McNally, Emory University
3:15 p.m. Adjourn Open Session

SECOND WORKSHOP ON THE TREATMENT OF CARDIAC ARREST: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Seattle City Hall 600 Fourth Avenue, Berthe Knight Landes Room Seattle, WA 98104

Monday, June 16, 2014

8:45 – 8:55 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks
Robert Graham, Committee Chair
Chief Gregory Dean, Seattle Fire Department
Director Jim Fogarty, King County Emergency Medical System
8:55 – 9:10 a.m. Overview of the Day
Robert Graham, Committee Chair
Mickey Eisenberg, Committee Vice-Chair
9:10 – 9:50 a.m. Overview of Cardiac Arrest in the United States: Public Health Burden and Evolution of the Field
Robert Neumar, University of Michigan
9:50 – 10:00 a.m. BREAK
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Panel 1: Hemodynamic (or Circulatory) and Neurological Outcomes, Risk Factors, and Disparities in Cardiac Arrest
Moderator: Dianne Atkins, Committee Member
Short- and Long-Term Hemodynamic Outcomes of Cardiac Arrest
  • Peter Kudenchuk, University of Washington (via WebEx)
Short- and Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Cardiac Arrest
  • Romer Geocadin, Johns Hopkins University
Pediatrics (i.e., adolescents and young adults)
  • Vinay Nadkarni, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Disparities in OHCA Outcomes
  • Comilla Sasson, American Heart Association
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. LUNCH
12:00 – 12:30 p.m. Seattle Fire Department’s Demonstration of a Simulated Cardiac Arrest and Emergency Medical Services Response
Jonathan Larsen, Captain, City of Seattle Fire Department
12:30 – 1:40 p.m. Panel 2: The Public’s Experience with Cardiac Arrest
Moderator: Ben Bobrow, Committee Member
Surviving Cardiac Arrest
  • Sue Nixon, Ardent Sage
Reducing Cardiac Arrest in Youth
  • Michele Wenhold, Parent Heart Watch
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
National Efforts to Raise Public Awareness of Sudden Cardiac Arrest
  • Mary Newman, Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation
Improving Bystander Usage of AEDs and CPR
  • Amer Aldeen, Chicago Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Education Service
1:40 – 3:00 p.m. Panel 3: Prehospital Cardiac Arrest and Emergency Medical Services Systems—Challenges and Opportunities for Improvement
Moderator: David Markenson, Committee Member
Characteristics of High-Performing EMS Systems in the United States
  • Thomas Rea, South King County Medic One Program
911-Dispatcher Training and Telecommunicator CPR
  • Cleo Subido, King County EMS
Cardiac Arrest: The Perspective of First Responders
  • David Jacobs, Durham Fire Department
Performance Standards and Enhancing EMT/Paramedic Training
  • Louis Gonzales, Office of the Medical Director at Austin-Travis County EMS System
3:00 – 3:15 p.m. BREAK
3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Panel 4: Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Databases, Clinical Trial Design, and Research—Current Limitations and Future Directions
Moderator: Tom Aufderheide, Committee Member
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Challenges Associated with Data Collection, Measurement, and Clinical Trial Design: Short- and Long-Term Goals
  • Graham Nichol, University of Washington-Harborview Center for Pre-hospital Emergency Care
Strategies to Improve Local and National Cardiac Arrest Data Registries
  • Bryan McNally, Emory University
Model Systems for Cardiac Arrest Research Across Multiple Jurisdictions
  • Ahamed Idris, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
4:30 – 4:55 p.m. Public Testifiers
4:55 – 5:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
The Honorable Nick Licata, Seattle Councilman Mickey Eisenberg, Committee Vice-Chair
5:00 p.m. ADJOURN

THIRD WORKSHOP ON THE TREATMENT OF CARDIAC ARREST: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

National Academies’ Keck Center 500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 100 Washington, DC 20001

Tuesday, August 25, 2014

9:00 – 9:15 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Robert Graham, Committee Chair
Mickey Eisenberg, Committee Vice-Chair
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
9:15 – 10:45 a.m. Panel 1: Treatment of Cardiac Arrest in Hospitals
Moderator: Nisha Chandra-Strobos, Committee Member
Cardiac Arrests in Hospitals: Where Have We Been and Where Do We Go from Here?
  • Paul Chan, St. Luke’s Health System
In-Hospital Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
  • Mary Ann Peberdy, Virginia Commonwealth University
State of In-Hospital Resuscitation in the United States
  • Dana Edelson, University of Chicago Medicine
Efforts to Improve Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the VA
  • Steven Bradley, Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado Health Care System
10:45 – 11:00 a.m. BREAK
11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Panel 2: Evolving Understanding of Known and Emerging Therapies and Treatments
Moderator: Lance Becker, Committee Member
Questioning the Science: What Is Known About Existing Therapies
  • Mike Weisfeldt, Johns Hopkins University
Evaluating and Developing Cardiac Arrest Drug Cocktails and Devices in the Next Decade
  • Demetris Yannopoulos, University of Minnesota Medical School
Emerging Therapies in Europe
  • Bernd Böttiger, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany
12:15 – 1:15 p.m. LUNCH
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
1:15 – 2:45 p.m. Panel 3: Enhancing the Pathway from Bench to Bedside
Moderator: Roger Lewis, Committee Member
The Need for Basic and Translational Research in Cardiac Arrest
  • Robert Berg, University of Pennsylvania
The Promise of New Trial Designs
  • Scott Berry, Berry Consultants
Topics in FDA Regulation of Resuscitation Drugs
  • Stephen Grant, Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products, Food and Drug Administration
Facilitating Resuscitation Device Development: An FDA Division of Cardiovascular Devices Perspective
  • Bram Zuckerman, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration
2:45 – 3:00 p.m. BREAK
3:00 – 4:30 p.m. Panel 4: New Strategies to Promote Improved Performance and Health Outcomes
Moderator: Robin Newhouse, Committee Member
Harnessing the Power of National Databases: Progress in Japan
  • Robert Berg, University of Pennsylvania
The Role of National Quality Improvement Efforts: Performance Measures and Centers of Excellence for the Care of Stroke Patients
  • Mark Alberts, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
The Influence of Social Marketing and Public Health Campaigns
  • Amy Burnett Heldman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Options to Create a Sustainable Business Model
  • Allison Crouch, Emory University
4:30 – 4:55 p.m. Public Comment
4:55 – 5:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
Robert Graham, Committee Chair
Mickey Eisenberg, Committee Vice-Chair
5:00 p.m. ADJOURN
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 403
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 404
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 405
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 406
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 407
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
×
Page 408
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
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Page 409
Suggested Citation:"B-- Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21723.
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Page 410
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Cardiac arrest can strike a seemingly healthy individual of any age, race, ethnicity, or gender at any time in any location, often without warning. Cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, following cancer and heart disease. Four out of five cardiac arrests occur in the home, and more than 90 percent of individuals with cardiac arrest die before reaching the hospital. First and foremost, cardiac arrest treatment is a community issue - local resources and personnel must provide appropriate, high-quality care to save the life of a community member. Time between onset of arrest and provision of care is fundamental, and shortening this time is one of the best ways to reduce the risk of death and disability from cardiac arrest. Specific actions can be implemented now to decrease this time, and recent advances in science could lead to new discoveries in the causes of, and treatments for, cardiac arrest. However, specific barriers must first be addressed.

Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival examines the complete system of response to cardiac arrest in the United States and identifies opportunities within existing and new treatments, strategies, and research that promise to improve the survival and recovery of patients. The recommendations of Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival provide high-priority actions to advance the field as a whole. This report will help citizens, government agencies, and private industry to improve health outcomes from sudden cardiac arrest across the United States.

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