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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
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APPENDIX B

BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

THOMAS PICKERING (Co-Chair), Vice Chairman, Hills and Company

Thomas Pickering, currently Vice Chairman at Hills and Company which provides advice and counsel to a number of major U.S. enterprises, retired as Senior Vice President for International Relations and a member of the Executive Council of The Boeing Company in 2006. Pickering joined Boeing in 2001, upon his retirement as U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs. Pickering holds the personal rank of Career Ambassador. In a diplomatic career spanning five decades, he was U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria, and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Pickering also served on assignments in Zanzibar and Dar es Salaam. From 1989 to 1992, he was Ambassador and Representative to the United Nations in New York. He also served as Executive Secretary of the Department of State and Special Assistant to Secretaries William Rogers and Henry Kissinger from 1973 to 1974. In 1983 and in 1986, Pickering won the Distinguished Presidential Award and, in 1996, the Department of State’s highest award – the Distinguished Service Award. He is a member of the International Institute of Strategic Studies and the Council on Foreign Relations. He speaks French, Spanish, and Swahili and has some fluency in Arabic, Hebrew, and Russian.

ADEL MAHMOUD (Co-Chair), Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University

Adel Mahmoud retired as President of Merck Vaccines and member of the Management Committee of Merck & Company, Inc. His prior academic service at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland spanned 25 years, concluding with the positions of Chairman of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief from 1987 to 1998. Dr. Mahmoud's academic pursuits have focused on investigations of the biology and function of eosinophils, particularly in host resistance to helminthic infections as well as determinants of infection and disease in human schistosomiasis and other infectious agents. At Merck, Dr. Mahmoud led the effort to develop four new vaccines which were launched in 2005-2006. Subsequently, Dr. Mahmoud's leadership in setting strategies for Global Health shaped the agenda of the Forum on Microbial Threats of the Institute of Medicine. He has authored and edited several textbooks.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

CATHERINE BERTINI, Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

Catherine Bertini teaches international relations and leadership courses to graduate students at the Maxwell School. She is also a senior fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs where she has co-chaired its agriculture policy initiatives. She has worked extensively on issues related to agricultural development, food security, and gender. For two years, she was a senior fellow at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Also, she served as United Nations Under Secretary General for Management (2003-05) and as Executive Director of the UN World Food Program (1992-2002), where she was responsible for major organizational reform. She was Assistant Secretary for Food and Consumer Services at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (1989-92). Ms. Bertini is the 2003 World Food Prize Laureate. In 2012, she served as a member of the Department of State’s Accountability Review Board on Benghazi.

KENNETH BRILL, Board Member at the Stimson Center

Kenneth Brill completed a 35-year diplomatic career in 2010. In his final Foreign Service assignment, he was the founding Director of the U.S. National Counterproliferation Center (NCPC), which is part of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Ambassador Brill served as NCPC’s Director for almost five years for three different Directors of National Intelligence. His overseas assignments included Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency and the UN Office in Vienna, Ambassador to the Republic of Cyprus, Acting-Ambassador and Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi, and Political Counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Amman. His assignments in Washington included Acting-Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, Executive Secretary of the Department and Special Assistant to the Secretary of State, Chief of Staff to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs, and Director of the Office of Egyptian Affairs. In addition, he spent a year as Deputy Commandant/International Affairs Advisor and Lecturer at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Finally, Ambassador Brill was the President of the Fund for Peace, a Washington, D.C.-based, internationally focused non-profit organization during 2010 and 2011.

THADDEUS BURNS, Senior Counsel for Intellectual Property and Trade, General Electric Company

As Senior Counsel for Intellectual Property and Trade, Thaddeus Burns leads a team of professionals supporting GE businesses and Global Research. Before joining GE, he worked in the appellate litigation practice at Jones Day in Washington and in Brussels on Intellectual Property and technology policy issues at Akin Gump. He also served at the U.S. Patent and the Trademark Office and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. He clerked for now retired

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

Chief Judge Karen Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He graduated from Catholic University School of Law in 1992.

MICHAEL CLEGG, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Irvine

Michael Clegg served on the faculty of four universities during a 42 year career and was most recently Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Clegg also served for 12 years as Foreign Secretary of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and is currently Vice President (External) of the International Council of Science and Co-Chair of the Inter-American Network of Academies of Science. Clegg’s research specialty is population genetics and molecular evolution, and he has published extensively in these fields. Clegg is a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He is a Fellow of the Global Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Member of several academies in Latin America and Africa.

GLEN DAIGGER, President, One Water Solutions, LLC

Glen Daigger is currently President of One Water Solutions, a professional services firm providing strategic consulting to a wide range of clients in the water sector. Prior to founding One Water Solutions, he was a Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for CH2M HILL, an international firm providing services in a wide range of infrastructure areas. Throughout his 35-year tenure, CH2M HILL became the largest and one of the most highly regarded professional services firms working in the water sector, developing and delivering innovative water solutions through the full range of delivery mechanisms, including conventional design-bid-build, design-build, and design-build-operate approaches. Recognized as a technical expert and innovator in his own right, he has also led the development and implementation of many innovative solutions and advanced water practices. With strong ties to academia, between 1994 and 1996 he served as professor and head of the Environmental Systems Engineering Department at Clemson University. He is the author of numerous reports, articles, and conference presentations on wastewater treatment and sustainable wastewater infrastructure. Among the numerous topics he has addressed are bioreactors, nutrient removal, water quality, optimization, chemically-enhanced treatment, and activated sludge.

KENT HUGHES, Public Policy Scholar, The Woodrow Wilson Center

Kent Hughes is currently a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where he also founded and directed the Program on America and the Global Economy. Prior to joining the Center, he was Associate Deputy Secretary of Commerce where he supported Secretaries Ron Brown, Mickey Kantor, and William Daley. Before entering the Administration, he was the President of the private sector Council on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

Competitiveness. Earlier he held a number of senior positions on Capitol Hill, including Chief Economist for Majority Leader Robert Byrd, Policy Director for Senator Gary Hart, and Senior Economist on the Joint Economic Committee. He has published two books, Trade, Taxes, and Transnationals: International Economic Decision Making in Congress and Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of American Economic Competitiveness and a large number of reports and articles dealing with innovation and foreign economic policy. For several years he has taught political science as an adjunct professor for the Washington Semester Program of Boston University. He first worked in Washington as a staff attorney with the Urban Law Institute. He was also an International Legal Center Fellow and a Latin American Teaching Fellow in Brazil where he did research on the Brazilian economy and worked on a reform of Brazilian legal education at the Faculty of Law of the University of Sao Paulo. Dr. Hughes holds a Ph.D. in economics from Washington University in St. Louis, an LL.B from Harvard Law School, and a B.A. from Yale University in Political and Economic Institutions.

CINDY JEBB, Professor, U.S. Military Academy

Colonel Cindy Jebb is Professor and Head of the Department of Social Sciences at the U.S. Military Academy. She teaches courses on Comparative Politics, International Security, Cultural Anthropology, Terrorism and Counterterrorism, and Officership. Colonel Jebb has served in numerous command and staff positions in the United States and overseas, including tours with the 1st Armored Division, III Corps, and the National Security Agency (NSA). Before reporting to the U.S. Military Academy, she served as the Deputy Commander of the 704th Military Intelligence Brigade, which supported NSA. During 2000-2001, she served as a Fellow at the Naval War College (2000-2001), where she taught a graduate-level course on Strategy and Force Planning, and during 2006-2007, she served as a Visiting Fellow for the Pell Center. Her research focus has been in the area of human security, conducting field research in Chad, Niger, and Djibouti and working on projects in Iraq and Afghanistan. She has authored/co-authored three books on international affairs. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Colonel Jebb received a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University in 1997.

MICHAEL JONES, Chief Technology Advocate, Google, Inc.

Michael Jones is Google’s chief technology advocate, charged with advancing the technology to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. He travels the globe to meet and speak with governments, businesses, partners, and customers in order to advance Google’s mission and technology. He was previously chief technologist of Google Maps, Earth, and Local Search - the team responsible for providing location intelligence and information in a global context to users worldwide. He was Chief Technology Officer of Keyhole Corporation, the company that developed

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

the technology used today in Google Earth. He was also CEO of Intrinsic Graphics, and earlier, the director of advanced graphics at Silicon Graphics. A prolific inventor and computer programmer since the 4th grade, he has developed scientific and interactive computer graphics software, held engineering and business executive roles, and is an avid reader, traveler, and amateur photographer using a home-built 4 gigapixel camera.

ROBERT PERITO, Executive Director, The Perito Group

Robert Perito is a consultant at the U.S. Institute of Peace and the former director of USIP’s Security Sector Governance Center of Innovation. He is an expert on security sector transformation and police reform in post-conflict societies and countries impacted by the Arab Spring. Before joining the institute, he was a career Foreign Service Officer with the Department of State, retiring with the rank of minister-counselor. He was Deputy Executive Secretary of the National Security Council. Perito received a Presidential Meritorious Service Award in 1990 for leading the U.S. delegation in the Angola peace talks and two State Department superior honor awards. He led the International Criminal Investigative Training Assistance Program at the U.S. Department of Justice, which trained police in international peace operations. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in Nigeria. He was a Visiting Lecturer in Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, Diplomat in Residence at American University and an adjunct professor at George Mason University. He is the author of Where is the Lone Ranger? America’s Search for a Stability Force; and The American Experience with Police in Peace Operations; co-author of Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism and Violent Crime; editor of A Guide for Participants in Peace, Stability, and Relief Operations; and author of 20 USIP Special Reports, plus book chapters and journal articles on Iraq, Afghanistan, and Haiti.

BRENDA PIERCE, Program Coordinator for the Energy Resources Program, U.S. Geological Survey

Brenda Pierce’s primary area of expertise is energy resources with an emphasis on coal geology and quality, oil and gas resource occurrence and assessment, gas hydrate research, and geothermal energy. Her career spans 20 years with the Department of the Interior. She has led research teams studying various energy resources, from their formation to potential environmental impacts of their occurrence and use, both domestically and globally. In recent years, she has focused intensively on unconventional energy resources such as shale oil and shale gas. She manages the program within the Department of Interior responsible for providing the scientific basis on the availability and quantity of worldwide energy resources. She represents the Department on a variety of interagency committees concerning energy and climate change issues at home and abroad, and she assigns staff members to work at U.S. embassies abroad in response to requests from the Department of State. Pierce received

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

both bachelor and master degrees in geology and sedimentology from George Washington University.

STEN VERMUND, Amos Christie Chair and Director, Vanderbilt University Institute for Global Health

StenVermund is an infectious disease epidemiologist and a pediatrician with clinical and research experience in child, adolescent, and women’s health. At Vanderbilt University, he serves as Professor of Pediatrics, Amos Christie Chair in Global Health, and Director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health. He directs several training and research grants from NIH and CDC, including projects under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. He served as the Principal Investigator for the HIV Prevention Trials Network from 2006-2102. For his service to the NIH/NIAID from 1988-1994, he was awarded the Public Health Service Superior Service Award in 1994, the highest civilian award in the U.S. Public Health Service.

In 2000, he co-founded the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, an independent research organization working closely with the Zambian Ministry of Health, PEPFAR, and international academic partners. In 2006, he established Friends in Global Health, LLC, Vanderbilt’s nongovernmental organization in Africa to spearhead rural HIV/TB care, treatment, and prevention programs in Mozambique’s Zambézia Province and in Nigeria’s Kwara and Niger States. Dr. Vermund has published over 450 articles and chapters in the field of women, adolescent, and child health, infectious disease control and prevention, and in infectious disease and cancer epidemiology. He is an active member of the Institute of Medicine.

DAVID VICTOR, Professor and Director, Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, University of California at San Diego (UCSD)

David Victor is a professor at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies and director of the School’s new Laboratory on International Law and Regulation. His research focuses on how the design of regulatory law affects issues such as environmental pollution and the operation of major energy markets. He is author of Global Warming Gridlock, which explains why the world hasn't made much diplomatic progress on the problem of climate change while also exploring new strategies that would be more effective. Prior to joining the faculty at UCSD, he served as director of the Program on Energy and Sustainable Development at Stanford University where he was also a professor at the Stanford Law School. There he built a research program that focused on the energy markets of the major emerging countries—mainly Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa. Earlier in his career, he directed the science and technology program at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, where he led the Council's task force on energy and was senior adviser to the task force on climate change. At Stanford and the Council he examined ways to improve management of the nation's $50 billion strategic oil reserve, strategies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

for advancing research and regulation of technologies needed for “geoengineering,” and a wide array of other topics related to technological innovation and the impact of innovation on economic growth.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies Of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Embedding a Culture of Science and Technology Throughout the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21730.
×
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Diplomacy for the 21st Century recommends steps that the Department of State should embrace to take full advantage of the leading science and technology (S&T) capabilities of the United States. These capabilities provide the department with many opportunities to promote a variety of the interests of the United States and its allies in a rapidly changing world wherein S&T are important drivers of economic development at home and abroad and help ensure international security. This report assesses and makes recommendations concerning the changing environment for the conduct of diplomacy in the years ahead, with a focus on the role of S&T in the development and implementation of U.S. policies and programs. According to this report, prompt steps by the department's leadership are essential to ensure adequate comprehension of the importance of S&T-related developments throughout the world and to incorporate this understanding within the nation's foreign policy for the 21st century. This report also urges the adoption by the department of a broader whole-of-society approach in carrying out its responsibilities at home and abroad - extending beyond traditional interagency coordination and the narrow band of current external partners to include foundations, universities, research centers, and other groups who are extending their international reach.

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