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Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

SHIRLEY MALCOM (Chair) is head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She serves on several boards, including the Heinz Endowments, Public Agenda, and Digital Promise. She is an honorary trustee of the American Museum of Natural History, a regent of Morgan State University, and a trustee of the California Institute of Technology. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of its Public Welfare Medal. She is a fellow of the AAAS and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served on the National Science Board and on the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. She has a B.S. in zoology from the University of Washington, an M.A. in zoology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in ecology from Pennsylvania State University.

CYNTHIA J. ATMAN is the founding director of the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching (CELT), a professor in Human Centered Design & Engineering, and the inaugural holder of the Mitchell T. and Lella Blanche Bowie Endowed Chair at the University of Washington (UW). Dr. Atman is co-director of the Consortium to Promote Reflection in Engineering Education, funded by the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. She was director of the NSF-funded Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education, a national research center that was funded from 2003-2010. Dr. Atman joined the UW in 1998 after 7 years on the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on engineering design learning, considering context in engineering design, and the use of reflec-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

tion to support learning. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). Dr. Atman holds a Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

GEORGE BOGGS is a clinical professor of higher education for the Roueche Graduate Center at National American University and an adjunct professor of higher education at San Diego State University. He is superintendent and president emeritus of Palomar College and president and chief executive officer emeritus of the American Association of Community Colleges. Previously, he served as a faculty member, division chair, and associate dean of instruction at Butte College in California. He has served on the boards of the American Council on Education, the Educational Testing Service, the National Center for Postsecondary Research, the National Center for Community College Student Engagement, the National Science Foundation, and the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology. He has a B.S. in chemistry from Ohio State University, an M.S. in chemistry from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. in education administration from the University of Texas, Austin.

PAMELA BROWN is associate provost at New York City College of Technology (City Tech) of the City University of New York, where she previously served as the dean of the School of Arts & Sciences. She also previously served as a program director in the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Her work has focused on creating initiatives to improve the retention and recruitment of students interested in careers in science, technology, engineering, and math fields. She was the principal investigator of an NSF project, “Metropolitan Mentors: (MMNet): Growing an Urban STEM Talent Pool across New York City.” She is the first woman to have received a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Polytechnic University (now NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering).

PETER BRUNS is a professor emeritus of genetics at Cornell University, where he held a number of positions, including professor of genetics, associate director of the Biotechnology Program, and director of the Division of Biological Sciences. Previously, he held several positions at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His scientific work includes pioneering methods to genetically manipulate the separate somatic and germinal nuclei of the single celled organism Tetrahymena thermophila. His work has also focused on education, including as founder of the Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers. He is the recipient of the Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education from the Genetics Society of America and of the Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education from the American Society for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

Cell Biology. He has an A.B. in zoology from Syracuse University and a Ph.D. in cell biology from the University of Illinois.

TABBYE CHAVOUS is a professor and associate dean for academic programs and initiatives at the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan. Her research centers around racial and gender identity development among African American adolescents and young adults and their relationship with students’ academic identities and its implications for academic and psychological adjustment. She also studies transitions to secondary schooling and higher education among ethnic minority students and racial and multicultural climates within secondary and higher education settings. She is a principal investigator and co-director of the university’s Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context and is working on a project examining academic identification processes among African American students pursuing academic pathways in STEM fields. She has a Ph.D. in community psychology from the University of Virginia.

CHARLES DE LEONE is professor of physics at California State University at San Marcos, where he helped found the university’s Committee on Undergraduate Research. He is principal investigator and director of a joint project with Palomar College aimed at increasing the number of graduates in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. He has been the principal investigator and co-principal investigator on multiple studies aimed at developing, adapting, and implementing best practices science curriculum. His physics education research includes the areas of multiple representations, student use of technology, and the efficacy of active-learning-based pedagogy. He has worked as a consultant and leader in professional development programs nationwide. He has a B.S. in physics from Santa Clara University and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California at Davis.

CATHERINE DIDION (Senior Program Officer) is on the staff of the National Academy of Engineering. Her portfolio includes projects on engineering education, the technical workforce, and diversity. Previously, she served as the executive director of the Association for Women in Science, and she has collaborated with the European Commission, the South African Ministry of Science and Technology, the Organization of American States, the InterAmerican Network of Academies of Sciences, and UNESCO. Her work focuses on issues of education, the workforce, and equity in engineering and science. In 2012 she was named one of 100 Women Leaders in STEM by STEM Connector. She completed her undergraduate degree at Mount Holyoke College and graduate work at the University of Virginia.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

FRANK DOBBIN is a professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology and the Edmond J. Safra lab fellow at Harvard University. Previously, he was an assistant professor at Princeton University. He studies organizations, inequality, economic behavior, and public policy and explores institutional factors that affect the participation of minorities and women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. He has won the American Sociological Association’s distinguished scholarly book award, the Max Weber award for inventing equal opportunity, and the Rosabeth Moss Kanter award for excellence in work-family research for civil rights law at work. He has a B.A. in sociology from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University.

MICHAEL FEDER (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He has worked on a broad range of issues including informal science education, K-12 science education standards, federal science education programs, and K-12 engineering education. He recently held a 2-year position as a policy analyst in the Office of Science and Technology Policy, managing its Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education, and providing the President and his senior staff with advice on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. Previously, he was a research associate at ICFi, an international consulting firm. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in applied developmental psychology from George Mason University.

S. JAMES GATES, Jr., is a university system regents professor, the John S. Toll professor of physics, and director of the Center for String and Particle Theory, all at the University of Maryland. He has made major contributions in the fields of supersymmetry, supergravity, and string theory. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He is a fellow of the American Physics Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Society of Black Physicists, and the British Institute of Physics. He serves on the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the Maryland Board of Education. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of Society for Science & the Public and on the Board of Advisors for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Laboratory. He is a recipient of the Medal of Science, the highest recognition given by the U.S. government to scientists. He has a B.S. in mathematics, a B.S. in physics, and a Ph.D. in physics, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

SYLVIA HURTADO is professor and director of the Higher Education Research Institute at the Graduate School of Education and Information

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

Studies at the University of California at Los Angeles. Her primary research interests are in student educational outcomes, campus climates, college impact on student development, and diversity in higher education. She is past president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education. She has coordinated several national research projects, including a U.S. Department of Education-sponsored project on how colleges are preparing students to achieve the cognitive, social, and democratic skills to participate in a diverse democracy. She currently directs a national longitudinal study on the preparation of underrepresented students for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers. She has an A.B. in sociology from Princeton University, an Ed.M. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Los Angeles.

LEAH H. JAMIESON (NAE) is John A. Edwardson dean of engineering, Ransburg distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, and professor of engineering education, all at Purdue University. She is co-founder and past director of the Engineering Projects in Community Service Program. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Jamieson is the current president of the IEEE Foundation. She is a recipient of the Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education from the National Academy of Engineering and of the Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars of the National Science Foundation. She has served as president and chief executive officer of the IEEE and board chair of the Anita Borg Institute. She has a B.S. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.A., an M.S.E., and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science, all from Princeton University.

ADRIANNA KEZAR is a professor for higher education at the University of Southern California and co-director of the university’s Pullias Center for Higher Education. Her work focuses on change, governance, and leadership in higher education and her research agenda explores the change process in higher education institutions and the role of leadership in creating change. She is also a qualitative researcher and has written several texts and articles about ways to improve qualitative research in education. Her recent research projects include a study of networks formed to work with faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to improve undergraduate education. She has a B.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

KENNETH R. KOEDINGER is a professor of human computer interaction and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include creating educational technologies that dramatically increase student achievement. He is a cofounder of Carnegie Learning, Inc., and leads LearnLab, the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center. He has created cognitive models, computer simulations of student thinking and learning that are used to guide the design of educational materials, practices, and technologies. With his colleagues, he has developed cognitive tutors for mathematics, science, and language and has tested them both in the laboratory and in classrooms. His research has contributed new principles and techniques for the design of educational software and has produced basic cognitive science research results on the nature of mathematical thinking and learning. He has a B.S. in mathematics, an M.S. in computer science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University.

JAY B. LABOV is the senior advisor for education and communication at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He has directed or contributed to many institutional reports on undergraduate education, teacher education, advanced study for high school students, K-8 education, and international education. He oversees various activities for the institutions, including confronting challenges to teaching evolution and improving education in the life sciences. Previously, he was on the biology faculty at Colby College. He is a Kellogg national fellow, a fellow in education of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Woodrow Wilson visiting fellow. He is a recipient of the Friend of Darwin award from the National Center for Science Education. He received a B.S. in biology from the University of Miami and M.S. in zoology and Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Rhode Island.

ELIZABETH O’HARE (Program Officer) is on the staff of the Board on Higher Education and the Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Her portfolio includes projects that address science, technology, engineering, and mathematics workforce development, research administration and the higher education regulatory environment, and the competitiveness of American research universities and the scientific enterprise. Previously, she served as a legislative assistant for Representative Rush Holt (NJ-12), where she handled energy, science, and education policy issues. She began her work in science policy at the Society for Research in Child Development as a congressional science policy fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has an A.B. in psychology from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

MURIEL POSTON is the dean of faculty and vice president of academic affairs at Pitzer College. Previously, she was dean of the faculty and vice president of academic affairs at Skidmore College and a faculty member in the biology/botany department at Howard University. She has served as the division director for human resource development in the Education and Human Resources Directorate at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and as the deputy division director for NSF’s Division of Biological Infrastructure. Her work has focused on supporting minority-serving institutions and underrepresented groups in STEM. Her research has been in the field of plant systematics, environmental law, and environmental policy. She is on the board of directors for the American Institute of Biological Sciences. She has a B.A. from Stanford University, an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a J.D. from the University of Maryland.

MARK B. ROSENBERG is president of Florida International University, where one of his major efforts has been in STEM education, including partnerships with local schools, community colleges, and community organizations. He previously held the positions of chancellor and executive vice president for academic affairs at the university, as well as a faculty member. He previously also served as chancellor for the board of governors of the State University System of Florida. His research interests have been as a political scientist specializing in Latin America. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development. He has a B.A. in political science from Miami University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh.

HEIDI SCHWEINGRUBER is director of the Board on Science Education of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director for several projects, including the one that published A Framework for K-12 Science Education. She coauthored two award-winning books for practitioners that translate findings of NRC reports for a broader audience: Ready, Set, Science! Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms and Surrounded by Science. Previously, she served as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education and as director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project. She has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan.

P. URI TREISMAN is professor of mathematics and of public affairs at the University of Texas at Austin and director of the university’s Charles A.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×

Dana Center, which carries out policy research and evaluation in support of efforts to raise educational standards and to enhance the state’s educational accountability system. His research focuses on designing programs that strengthen the teaching and learning of mathematics and science. He serves on the Policy and Priorities Committee of the Education Commission of the States and is a founding board member of the National Center for Public Policy in Higher Education. He also serves on the 21st Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges, an initiative of the American Association of Community Colleges. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship for his work in developing programs to strengthen the education of minority and rural students. He has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of California at Los Angeles and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, where he studied both mathematics and education.

MICHELLE VAN NOY is associate director at the Rutgers University Education and Employment Research Center. Previously, she worked at the Community College Research Center at Teachers College at Columbia University, where she conducted studies of contextualized basic skills education, employer perceptions of the associate degree for information technology technician jobs, and community college noncredit workforce education. She also previously worked at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Her research focuses on the role of higher education, particularly community colleges, in workforce development. Her current work focuses on effective practices in community college workforce education, student decision making about majors and pathways through higher education, and linkages between education and employers. She has a B.A. in psychology and Spanish and an M.S. in public policy from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in sociology and education from Columbia University.

X. BEN WU is a professor of ecology and presidential professor for teaching excellence at Texas A&M University. At the university, he formerly served as associate dean of faculties and director of the Center for Teaching Excellence with responsibility for organizing the efforts in faculty professional development in teaching. Previously, he was on the faculty of Ohio State University. His research interests are landscape ecology and undergraduate ecology education. One major interest is exploring technology-enhanced pedagogy for active learning, especially web-based and virtual authentic inquiry projects in large-enrollment introductory ecology classes and their effects on student learning. He has a B.S. in botany from the Lanzhou University and an M.S. in ecology and management science and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Tennessee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 190
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 191
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 192
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 193
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21739.
×
Page 194
Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students' Diverse Pathways Get This Book
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Nearly 40 percent of the students entering 2- and 4-year postsecondary institutions indicated their intention to major in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in 2012. But the barriers to students realizing their ambitions are reflected in the fact that about half of those with the intention to earn a STEM bachelor’s degree and more than two-thirds intending to earn a STEM associate’s degree fail to earn these degrees 4 to 6 years after their initial enrollment. Many of those who do obtain a degree take longer than the advertised length of the programs, thus raising the cost of their education. Are the STEM educational pathways any less efficient than for other fields of study? How might the losses be “stemmed” and greater efficiencies realized? These questions and others are at the heart of this study.

Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees reviews research on the roles that people, processes, and institutions play in 2-and 4-year STEM degree production. This study pays special attention to the factors that influence students’ decisions to enter, stay in, or leave STEM majors—quality of instruction, grading policies, course sequences, undergraduate learning environments, student supports, co-curricular activities, students’ general academic preparedness and competence in science, family background, and governmental and institutional policies that affect STEM educational pathways.

Because many students do not take the traditional 4-year path to a STEM undergraduate degree, Barriers and Opportunities describes several other common pathways and also reviews what happens to those who do not complete the journey to a degree. This book describes the major changes in student demographics; how students, view, value, and utilize programs of higher education; and how institutions can adapt to support successful student outcomes. In doing so, Barriers and Opportunities questions whether definitions and characteristics of what constitutes success in STEM should change. As this book explores these issues, it identifies where further research is needed to build a system that works for all students who aspire to STEM degrees. The conclusions of this report lay out the steps that faculty, STEM departments, colleges and universities, professional societies, and others can take to improve STEM education for all students interested in a STEM degree.

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