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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
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Appendix D


Workshop Speaker Biographies

Honorable Justice Batema Ndikanbona David Akky serves as a Justice on the High Court of Uganda.

Rose Apondi, M.P.H., is a Public Health Specialist with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Uganda.

Ian Askew, Ph.D., is the Director of Reproductive Health Services and Research within the Council’s Reproductive Health Program. Dr. Askew coordinates the Council’s research and technical assistance activities for strengthening reproductive and maternal health services through its country offices across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Based in Nairobi since 1992, Dr. Askew has three decades of experience in implementing and managing implementation research on a wide range of reproductive health issues. Dr. Askew is also Co-Director for the Council’s Strengthening Evidence for Programming on Unintended Pregnancy research consortium, and is Leader of the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition’s Market Development Approaches Working Group. Dr. Askew’s professional interests include health systems strengthening and research; strengthening and evaluating quality of care; innovative health financing mechanisms; integrating reproductive health with other health services; improving community-based health services; responding to the consequences of sexual and gender-based violence; and abandonment of female genital mutilation/cutting.

Jacquelyn Campbell, Ph.D., R.N. (Workshop Co-Chair), is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

partner violence (IPV). Her studies paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary investigations by researchers in the disciplines of nursing, medicine, and public health. Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. As a nurse educator and mentor, Dr. Campbell leads by example in inspiring new generations of nurse researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her B.S.N., M.S.N., and Ph.D. are from Duke University, Wright State University, and the University of Rochester, respectively. She teaches an undergraduate and M.S.N. elective in Family Violence as well as in the Ph.D. program and is the Principal Investigator of an National Institutes of Health–funded (T32) fellowship that provides funding for pre- and postdoctoral fellows in violence research. Elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the IOM/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses’ Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and currently serves as co-chair of the IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the NIH National Institute for Nursing Research; Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing; the American Society of Criminology Vollmer award, and being named 1 of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is a current member of the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence and has served on the board for the House of Ruth Battered Women’s Shelter and four other shelters. She was also a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence.

Lina Digolo, M.B.B.S., M.Med., is a pediatrician with more than 10 years work experience in HIV, sexual, and reproductive clinical and program management. She holds a master’s of Medicine Degree in Pediatrics and bachelor’s degree in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Nairobi and is currently pursuing an M.S.C. in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Digolo is currently the Care and Treatment Manager at LVCT Health, a local nongovernmental organization in Kenya, where she provides oversight for the HIV treatment, gender and gender-based violence, and blood safety programs. She is actively involved in the design, implementation, and dissemination of operations research studies conducted with the institution and has vast experience in gender-based violence advocacy and policy development. As an active member of the National Gender and Reproductive Health Technical Working Group in Kenya, she ensures the locally generated evidence is used to inform the development of policy documents and national standards. She is currently a principal investigator in the following IPV related research study: (a) the acceptability and feasibility of IPV screening in voluntary counselling and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

testing settings in Kenya, and (b) integration of IPV screening and counselling models in HIV clinical settings in public hospitals in Kenya.

Abigail M. Hatcher is a Senior Researcher at Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute. Her mixed-methods research centers on designing and testing behavioral and structural interventions for IPV among women and male partners. Based in Johannesburg, Ms. Hatcher is a Co-PI for a World Health Organization–funded trial of an empowerment counseling intervention for IPV in pregnancy (PI: Garcia-Moreno). She also serves as a Co-Investigator for a NIH-funded home-based couples intervention among pregnant women and male partners in Kenya (PI: Turan). Ms. Hatcher previously led a process evaluation of the Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity (IMAGE), explored the effects of a gender-trans-formative program on men’s use of IPV, and examined linkage to HIV care among newly diagnosed individuals. Ms. Hatcher currently manages a team of eight researchers in Johannesburg and mentors qualitative researchers in Johannesburg, San Francisco, and Kisumu, Kenya. She has published and peer reviewed for international journals and is frequent contributor to the Sexual Violence Research Initiative. As a Ph.D. candidate in the Wits School of Public Health, Ms. Hatcher is using quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the effects of IPV on prevention of mother-to-child transmission uptake among pregnant and postpartum HIV-positive women.

Nduku Kilonzo, Ph.D., is the new Director of the Kenya National AIDS Control Council (NACC). A Ph.D. holder in Tropical Medicine Gender and Health from the University of Liverpool, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), Dr. Kilonzo has been involved in the development of innovative, quality-assured HIV Testing and Counseling program in Kenya, Malawi, Botswana, and Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast). Her primary research and publications have been in the area of sexual violence and HIV. Her work has provided evidence for the development of integrated public health facility post-rape care services that are currently offered in more than 250 hospitals in Kenya and HIV prevention interventions. Dr. Kilonzo has more than 20 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters and has been the team leader in developing the Kenya National HIV Testing and Counseling Report 2011/12. She is currently an Advisor in Gender and Rights Advocacy Panel to the WHO, an editor of Reproductive Health Matters, and a member of the Public Health Association of Kenya. Prior to joining the NACC, Dr. Kilonzo was the Executive Director of LVCT Health (formerly Liverpool VCT Care & Treatment, a local Kenyan NGO offering care and treatment to more than 40,000 individuals, testing to 1.2 million annually, performing research, and advocating policy reforms). She was the Executive Director for the past 6 years.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

Edward Kirumira, Ph.D. (Workshop Co-Chair), trained at Makerere University, Exeter University in the United Kingdom, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, in collaboration with Harvard University in the United States. Dr. Kirumira specialized in Population and Reproductive Health with extensive research work in HIV/AIDS, emergent diseases and international health issues, family relationships, health seeking behavior, poverty, and rural development studies. He is also a visiting senior researcher to a number of European and African universities. Dr. Kirumira is the Treasurer, Uganda National Academy of Sciences (UNAS), UNAS Fellow & Council member, and Chairperson of the UNAS Forum on Health and Nutrition. He is the Principal of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Makerere University and a Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology. He was the Dean of Faculty of Social Sciences since 2003 and before that was the Head of the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, for 5 years. Dr. Kirumira chairs the Resource Mobilization and Planning Committee of Uganda Central coordinating mechanism for the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria country program and has offered technical advisory role to national, regional, and international bodies. His interest is in population and reproductive health, with more than 15 years of HIV/AIDS research and programming. Other areas include program development, monitoring, and impact evaluation.

Samuel Likindikoki, M.D., is a Lecturer and Head of Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health at Muhimbili University. He is also a Medical Specialist [Psychiatrist] working with Muhimbili National Hospital situated in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Dr. Likindikoki is a researcher focusing on areas of HIV prevention and the intersections between HIV/AIDS and mental health. Some of the topical areas he is interested are HIV as it relates to gender-based violence, mental health and concurrency partnerships; key populations such as people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men and female sex workers. Dr. Likindikoki has participated in a number of collaborative research efforts: at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health he was part of a formative study on key populations, a study on strategic assessment for possible HIV combination prevention, a formative assessment for concurrency partnership in the context of HIV prevention, and a study to evaluate campaign communication materials for HIV prevention; at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine he researched women empowerment and partner’s violence; at the Medical Research Counsel of South Africa he studied gender-based violence prevention in schools and he participated in parenting studies. Dr. Likindikoki works with the MUHAS-based Tanzania AIDS Prevention Program (TAPP) as the GBV and Alcohol Intervention program area lead. He has also spearheaded

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

the integration of GBV and OH interventions among people attending HIV testing and counselling services.

Karim Manji Premji, M.P.H., M.Med., did his B.Sc. in Udaipur, India, and was selected to join MKCG Medical College in Orissa under a Tanzanian government scholarship in 1981. As soon as he completed his internship, he joined the then Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences (University of Dar es Salaam) as a Resident in Pediatrics, and thereafter, there was no looking back. He joined as lecturer in March 1992 after completion of M.Med. in Pediatrics. He received the Commonwealth University Scholarship for fellowship in neonatal medicine, which he pursued at the Hammersmith Hospital, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London. He was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1997 and to Associate Professor in 2001. In the year 2003, he completed his master’s in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health and was promoted to Full Professor in 2006. He maintains the record of having been granted Full Professorship at the youngest age. As a student he was a recipient of awards and scholarships, and as a researcher, he has undertaken several large-scale research studies. He has participated in several national and international committees; of particular interest are his membership in National PMTCT committees. He served the university as Associate Dean of Postgraduate Research for 3 months before becoming the Deputy Registrar during the founding of MUHAS from January 2004 to October 2007 and now is the Dean, School of Medicine. He has more than 95 publications and continues to publish, and has 3 books to his credit. Recently, he was nominated as an eminent scientist in the Tanzania Academy of Sciences as a fellow.

Jessie Mbwambo, M.D., is Senior Medical Specialist Psychiatrist II and Senior Researcher at Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences and Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Dr. Mbwambo holds a medical degree from the University of Dar es Salaam, and her Diploma in Psychiatry from University of Manchester, Victoria. In 2005, she served as the head of the Tanzania research team member for the WHO’s Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence against Women. Dr. Mbwambo’s research and expertise focuses on HIV intervention and prevention, in youth and adults, as well as the relationship between HIV and violence against women.

Lori Michau, M.A., is the Co-Founder and Co-Director of Raising Voices, a nonprofit organization based in Kampala, Uganda, working to prevent violence against women and children. She also spearheaded the creation of the GBV Prevention Network, now coordinated by Raising Voices, with more than 700 members in the Horn, East, and Southern Africa.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

Ms. Michau is also a founding member of the Center for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDOVIP) and prior to her work in Uganda, was the Program Development Coordinator at Jijenge! Women’s Center for Sexual Health in Mwanza, Tanzania. Ms. Michau has extensive experience in community mobilization and has developed comprehensive methodologies for violence prevention that are being used in more than 50 countries in Africa and beyond. Ms. Michau is the author of numerous articles and program tools, including the SASA! Activist Kit for Preventing Violence Against Women and HIV. Ms. Michau received her M.A. in Human Rights from Makerere University in Uganda and has been based in East Africa since 1995.

Tina Musuya, M.A., is the Executive Director for CEDOVIP, with extensive experience in working with communities, institutions, and policy makers to prioritize violence prevention in Uganda. Ms. Musuya is responsible for all programmatic oversight for CEDOVIP work. She brings 9 years of leadership experience in activism for promoting women’s rights in Uganda, with special skills in community mobilization for prevention of violence against women. She is proactive and bears a track record of mentoring willing individuals into “everyday activists” who stand up and act to prevent violence against women in their own relationships and communities.

Gertrude Nakigozi, M.P.H., M.B.B.S., holds a bachelor’s degree in human medicine and surgery from Makerere University Medical School, and a master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She works with Rakai Health Sciences Program as head of clinical services, where she oversees provision of HIV care and treatment to HIV positive adults and children in Rakai district. She is also involved in HIV and reproductive health research.

Fredrick Nyagah is the National Coordinator of MenEngage Kenya Network (MenKen) since its inception in 2006. MenKen is a national alliance organizations and individuals with interest in engaging men and boys in sexual and reproductive health, gender equality, positive fatherhood, and prevention of gender-based violence and HIV and AIDS. It also builds capacity of other organization in the engaging men and boys. The network works closely with government and is affiliated to MenEngage Global Alliance and Africa Regional Network. He is also the Program Coordinator of Healthy Outcomes through Prevention Education (HOPE) Program, which is implemented by CHF International (changing to Global Communities) with partnership with the Ministry of education Science and Technology. The program seeks to improve HIV and AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and practices among primary and secondary school-aged students through peer, school, and community-based interventions. He has also worked in EngenderHealth

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

as a Regional Program Associate for the Global Men as Partners/Gender program; Program Officer in Men as Partners (MAP) Program in Kenya and as a Senior Program Officer for CHAMPION (Channeling Men’s Positive Involvement in a National HIV/AIDS response) project in Tanzania. Before joining EngenderHealth, he worked for Action Aid-Kenya as a Research and Policy Coordinator and for Family Health Options Kenya (formerly Family Planning Association of Kenya) as a Youth Program Officer. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Education and is working on his thesis for his master’s degree in Health Management from Kenyatta University.

Odongo Odiyo, M.Med., has 33 years of clinical and research experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Currently he is the Manager, Family and Reproductive Health with East, Central, and Southern Africa (ECSA) Health Community. He has been a passionate campaigner for human rights especially for those due to political orientation. He has been involved in fighting for the rights of inmates and political detainees in Kenya since 1998. Dr. Odiyo has been involved in conducting postmortems of torture victims and representing their cases in courts of law (he has trained in Crime Scene Investigations). He was involved in the development of post-rape care form. He took lead in the development of regional GBV and child sexual abuse (CSA) policy, guidelines in the clinical management of CSA, and literature review on CSA in sub-Saharan Africa (2009–2011). He has spearheaded the implementation of these instruments at the country level. He also took lead in the development of documentaries on GBV and CSA to lobby for mobilization of resources to support regional response and prevention of GBV and CSA. He was instrumental in the introduction, and eventual recommendation, on IPV to the health ministers and eventual passing of resolution on IPV in 2012. Currently he is involved in the implementation of ministerial resolution on IPV, and other ministerial resolutions on GBV and CSA. Future plans include documenting physical and psychological sequelae of all forms of violence in war-torn countries and recommending appropriate responses and prevention.

Christine Ondoa, M.B.B.S., M.Med., M.P.A., is the Director General of Uganda AIDS Commission. She commenced her duties in February 2014 following her appointment by the President of the Republic of Uganda. Dr. Ondoa brings with her a rich academic background plus a wealth of experience in medicine, health, policy design and implementation, public health service delivery, and program administration and management, in addition to advocacy and leadership skills. She has served in key regional, national, and international positions. Before her appointment to the Uganda AIDS Commission, she was the Minister of Health in 2011 to 2013. She later served as a Senior Presidential Advisor to the President of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

Uganda on public health issues, besides serving as a board member of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization. Dr. Ondoa also served as the Executive Director of Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, Director of Jinja Regional Referral Hospital, and she was the Regional Pediatrician for the West Nile region based in Arua Regional Referral Hospital. Dr. Ondoa has worked with several international organizations such as the WHO; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; the U.S.-funded President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); AIDS/HIV Integrated Model District Program (AIM); Save the Children; and the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), where she served in different capacities ranging from coordinator to trainer. Furthermore, Dr. Ondoa coordinated Uganda’s national Malaria Control Program, the HIV/AIDS Program, and the Uganda National Expanded Program on Immunization for a number of years. She holds a bachelor of Human Medicine and Surgery, a master’s of Medicine in Pediatrics and Child Health, with additional training and experience in pediatric HIV/AIDS. On top of that, she holds a master’s in Management Studies in Public Administration and Management, as well as several postgraduate certificates in leadership. Furthermore, she has carried out extensive research on topical public health themes such as HIV/AIDS and health service delivery, among others. She also belongs to several professional medical bodies.

Silvia Pasti is the Chief of Child Protection for UNICEF Uganda.

Datius Rweyemamu, Ph.D., is a specialist in adolescent sexual and reproductive health with extensive research on HIV/AIDS, adolescent sexuality, media communication, and malaria. Currently, he is a lecturer at the University of Dar es Salaam teaching Social Research Methods, Gender, and Population Development as well as Sociology of Sexuality. Dr. Rweyemamu is also a co-PI for the 4-year project named Media, Empowerment and Democracy in East Africa-MEDIeA, a project jointly implemented by three universities: University of Nairobi (Kenya), Roskilde University (Denmark), and University of Dar es Slaam (Tanzania). Dr. Rweyemamu is also one of the co-authors of the publication Help-Seeking Pathways and Barriers for Survivors of Gender-based Violence in Tanzania. With support from Global Fund and in collaboration with National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Dr. Rweyemamu is also currently doing research for the study “Assessing Health Systems Financing and Quality Services for Youth Living with HIV and AIDS in Tanzania.” He is a graduate of the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and he holds a doctoral degree in Sociology and a master’s degree in Demography from the same institution. His publications, particularly on sexuality, HIV/AIDS, gender norms, and malaria, appear both in local and international journals.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

Olive Sentumbwe-Mugisa, M.B.B.S., has her basic training in Medicine and has specialized in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She has had 14 years of active clinical practice and now 16 years with the WHO in Uganda as the Family Health and Population Advisor. She has worked majorly on policies, guidelines, and programs with the Ministry of Health in the area of reproductive health with all its components as laid down at the Cairo Conference on Population and Development. In Uganda we have been working on gender and GBV issues for about 8 years, looking at issues of mainstreaming gender in health and focusing on GBV for service delivery as well as human rights and health. We are currently reviewing our training manuals and service standards as well as advocacy packs using the available data both in Uganda and outside it.

Anna Swai is a member of the Tanzania Assoication of Social Workers.

Chi-Chi Undie, Ph.D., is an Associate with the Population Council’s Reproductive Health program in Nairobi. Since joining the Council in 2009, Dr. Undie’s research has had a primary focus on sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and married adolescent girls. She coordinates and provides technical support to the Population Council-led Africa Regional SGBV Network—an active network of partners from across the East and Southern Africa region who have been developing, implementing, and evaluating core elements of a comprehensive, multisectoral response model. Her work on SGBV has had wide influence on policy and practice, leading to the passage of a resolution calling for the integration of IPV screening into sexual and reproductive health and HIV and AIDS services throughout East, Central, and Southern Africa. Her SGBV work has recently been extended to refugee settings and to meeting the needs of child survivors of sexual violence in the region. Before joining the Council, Dr. Undie was a Ford Foundation postdoctoral fellow and, later, an associate research scientist at the African Population and Health Research Center. There she led the center’s sexuality program and conducted several sexual and reproductive health research projects. She holds an interdisciplinary doctoral degree in Language, Literacy, and Culture.

Jennifer Wagman, Ph.D., M.H.S., is a social scientist whose research integrates behavioral theory and infectious disease epidemiology. Her primary interests lie in examining the relationship between (and learning how to effectively respond to) women’s risk for IPV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. In June 2013 Dr. Wagman completed her Ph.D. at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In August 2013 she began a postdoctoral fellowship training program in substance use, HIV, and related infections (T32 DA 023356; PI:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×

Strathdee) in the Division of Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. As a postdoctoral fellow she is extending her research agenda to investigate the role of alcohol and substance abuse on the overlapping epidemics of IPV and HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa.

Charlotte Watts, Ph.D., is Head of the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group and founding director of the Gender, Violence and Health Centre, in the Department for Global Health and Development. Originally trained as a mathematician, with further training in epidemiology, economics, and social science methods, she has more than 15 years experience in international HIV and violence research, and brings a strong multidisciplinary perspective to the complex challenge of addressing HIV and violence against women. Dr. Watts has more than 120 publications in peer-reviewed journals, and manages a large portfolio of research, including research director of the United Kingdom Department for International Development–funded STRIVE structural drivers HIV drivers Research Programme Consortium, and Chair of the Expert Working Group to Assess the Global Burden of Inter-Personal Violence against Women. She was a Core Research Team Member for the WHO Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence, and a senior researcher on the IMAGE violence prevention study in South Africa. She has served on Expert Consultations for The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, the WHO, the World Bank, and UNICEF, was a member of the coordinating committee for the IOM on the contagion on violence, and has been on the Track C organizing committee for several International AIDS conferences. She is a member of the Peer Review Board for the UK Economic and Social Research Council, and has reviewed grants for NIH, the United Kingdom Medical Research Council, the South African MRC, CIMH, and the European Union.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Speaker Biographies." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania: Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21756.
×
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Globally, between 15-71 percent of women will experience physical and/or sexual abuse from an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime. Too often this preventable form of violence is repetitive in nature, occurring at multiple points across the lifespan. The prevalence of intimate partner violence is on the higher end of this spectrum in East Africa, with in-country demographic and health surveys indicating that approximately half of all women between the ages of 15-49 in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania having experienced physical or sexual abuse within a partnership.

It is now widely accepted that preventing intimate partner violence is possible and can be achieved through a greater understanding of the problem; its risk and protective factors; and effective evidence-informed primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. To that end, on August 11-12, 2014, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Global Violence Prevention, in a collaborative partnership with the Uganda National Academy of Sciences, convened a workshop focused on informing and creating synergies within a diverse community of researchers, health workers, and decision makers committed to promoting intimate partner violence-prevention efforts that are innovative, evidence-based, and crosscutting. This workshop brought together a variety of stakeholders and community workers from Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania to engage in a meaningful, multidirectional dialogue regarding intimate partner violence in the region. Preventing Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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