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Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
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Appendix A

Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures

David C. Dorman (Chair) is a professor of toxicology in the Department of Molecular Biosciences of North Carolina State University. The primary objective of his research is to provide a refined understanding of chemically induced neurotoxicity in laboratory animals that will lead to improved assessment of potential neurotoxicity in humans. Dr. Dorman's research interests include neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and cognition and olfaction in animals. He has served on multiple National Research Council committees and recently chaired the Committee on Design and Evaluation of Safer Chemical Substitutions: A Framework to Inform Government and Industry Decisions. He has served on other advisory boards for the US Navy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Agriculture and is currently a member of the National Toxicology Program’s Board of Scientific Counselors. He is an elected fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his DVM from Colorado State University. He completed a combined PhD and residency program in toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicology.

Weihsueh A. Chiu is a professor in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Before joining Texas A&M University, Dr. Chiu worked at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for over 14 years, most recently as chief of the Toxicity Pathways Branch in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Division of the National Center for Environmental Assessment. His research has focused on human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity, physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, dose–response assessment, and characterizing uncertainty and variability. He led the development of EPA’s 2011 IRIS assessment of trichloroethylene, which pioneered the use of probabilistic methods for characterizing uncertainty and variability in toxicokinetics and dose–response relationships. Dr. Chiu received his PhD in physics from Princeton University.

Haiyan Huang is an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. She is interested in the interface between statistics and data-rich scientific disciplines, such as biology. Her research is focused on applied and theoretical statistics, high dimensional and integrative genomic data analysis, hierarchical multilabel classification, and translational bioinformatics. Dr. Huang earned a PhD in applied mathematics from the University of Southern California.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
×

Andy Nong is the lead computational toxicologist of Health Canada. His research focuses on computer models of biological systems that can be applied to understand and predict the fate of a chemical dose in the body and its possible health effects. Dr. Nong also explores different types of computing approaches (pharmacokinetic models, benchmark dosing, chemical structure–activity regression, and systems-biology models) that can help to evaluate chemical safety and eventually support the screening of a larger set of chemicals that lead to similar health outcomes. Before coming to Health Canada, he worked as a research investigator with the Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences. Dr. Nong received his PhD in public health and toxicology from the University of Montreal.

Grace Patlewicz is a research chemist at the National Center for Computational Toxicology of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Before joining EPA, she was employed as a computational toxicologist by DuPont’s Haskell Global Centers for Health and Environmental Sciences where she acted as a focal point and technical lead for all (quantitative) structure–activity relationships ([Q]SAR) and read-across queries for product stewardship and regulatory purposes. A chemist and toxicologist by training, she started her career as a safety-evaluation scientist at Unilever before focusing her interests in computational toxicology and moving into a role that involved providing modeling and chemistry expertise for a variety of projects. While working for the (Q)SAR group at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, she was involved in many activities related to the development of technical guidance for Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), including investigation of the feasibility of using computational approaches in the development of chemical categories, development and evaluation of (Q)SAR models for human health, and coordination of the technical development of software tools, such as Toxtree and Toxmatch. Dr. Patlewicz received her PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

David M. Reif is an associate professor of biological sciences at North Carolina State University and resident member of the Bioinformatics Research Center. His research focuses on the complex interactions between human health and the environment through the integrated analysis of high-dimensional data from diverse sources, including epidemiological studies of human health, high-throughput screening of environmental chemicals, and model organism data. Dr. Reif was previously a principal investigator with the US Environmental Protection Agency’s National Center for Computational Toxicology, where he led several statistical and bioinformatics efforts and collaborated on a variety of projects with federal, academic, and industry partners. Dr. Reif received his PhD in human genetics from Vanderbilt University.

John Wade is vice president and general manager of the Life Sciences Research Business in the National Security Division of Battelle. He is responsible for all Battelle’s animal-use laboratories and activities, in particular chemical–biological defense research, development, test, and evaluation and general toxicology test and evaluation services for both government and commercial customers. Dr. Wade has been a member-at-large of the NATO Human Factors and Medicine Panel as the US delegation’s chemical- and biological-defense expert since 2000. He also serves as the chairman emeritus of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Chemical and Biological Defense Division. Dr. Wade received his DVM from Michigan State University and his PhD in toxicology from the University of Kansas School of Medicine, and he was a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology from 1991 to 2006.

Katrina Waters is the deputy division director for biological sciences at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Her research interests are reconstruction of cell-response networks from integrated gene- and protein-expression data to enable predictive mechanistic modeling of disease and toxicity pathways. Dr. Waters serves on the US Food and Drug Administration National Center for Toxicological Research’s Science Advisory Board and the US Environmental Protec-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
×

tion Agency’s Scientific Advisory Panel on Methods for Prioritizing Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. She is a member of the Society of Toxicology and adjunct faculty in the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University. Dr. Waters received a PhD in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin.

Barbara Wetmore is a senior research investigator at The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences. Her research focuses on integration of predictive modeling tools with high-throughput screening and other in vitro strategies to address issues of importance in chemical safety and risk assessment. Other research interests have been the application of genomic and proteomic tools to inform chemical mode-of-action assessments and biomarker discovery. She is vice-president-elect of the Society of Toxicology’s In Vitro and Alternative Methods Specialty Section, and she has served as a study-section reviewer for the US Environmental Protection Agency and as an expert for the European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL-ECVAM). Dr. Wetmore received her PhD in toxicology from North Carolina State University.

Yvonne Will is a senior director and the global science and technology lead for drug safety at Pfizer. Her research interests include mitochondrial, mechanistic, and cell-based toxicity assessment; drug-induced organ toxicities; and alternative in vitro and in vivo models. Dr. Will is the president of the Society of Toxicology’s Drug Discovery Specialty Section and a member of the steering committee of the Technology Industry Consortium. She also serves on the editorial board of Current Protocols in Toxicology (John Wiley and Sons) and Applied In Vitro Toxicology (Mary Ann Liebert, Incy). Dr. Will received her PhD in biochemistry and biophysics from Oregon State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
×
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
×
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Information on the Committee on Predictive-Toxicology Approaches for Military Assessments of Acute Exposures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21775.
×
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The US Department of Defense (DOD) is faced with an overwhelming task in evaluating chemicals that could potentially pose a threat to its deployed personnel. There are over 84,000 registered chemicals, and testing them with traditional toxicity-testing methods is not feasible in terms of time or money. In recent years, there has been a concerted effort to develop new approaches to toxicity testing that incorporate advances in systems biology, toxicogenomics, bioinformatics, and computational toxicology. Given the advances, DOD asked the National Research Council to determine how DOD could use modern approaches for predicting chemical toxicity in its efforts to prevent debilitating, acute exposures to deployed personnel. This report provides an overall conceptual approach that DOD could use to develop a predictive toxicology system. Application of Modern Toxicology Approaches for Predicting Acute Toxicity for Chemical Defense reviews the current state of computational and high-throughput approaches for predicting acute toxicity and suggests methods for integrating data and predictions. This report concludes with lessons learned from current high-throughput screening programs and suggests some initial steps for DOD investment.

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