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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
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References

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
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Hibbard, J. H., and J. Greene. 2013. What the evidence shows about patient activation: Better health outcomes and care experiences; fewer data on costs. Health Affairs (Millwood) 32(2):207-214.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
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Stockwell, M. S., A. M. Hofstetter, N. DuRivage, A. Barrett, N. Fernandez, C. Y. Vargas, and S. Camargo. 2015. Text message reminders for second dose of influenza vaccine: A randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics 135(1):e83-e91.

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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21781.
×
Page 92
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The proliferation of consumer-facing technology and personal health information technology has grown steadily over the past decade, and has certainly exploded over the past several years. Many people have embraced smartphones and wearable health-monitoring devices to track their fitness and personal health information. Providers have made it easier for patients and caregivers to access health records and communicate through online patient portals. However, the large volume of health-related information that these devices can generate and input into a health record can also lead to an increased amount of confusion on the part of users and caregivers.

The Institute of Medicine convened a workshop to explore health literate practices in health information technology and then provide and consider the ramifications of this rapidly growing field on the health literacy of users. Health Literacy and Consumer-Facing Technology summarizes the discussions and presentations from this workshop, highlighting the lessons presented, practical strategies, and the needs and opportunities for improving health literacy in consumer-facing technology.

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