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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
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Appendix B

Agenda

DAY ONE: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2014

8:45–9:15: Registration and continental breakfast

9:15–9:30:

Welcoming remarks and overview: David A. Relman, James M. Hughes, Lonnie King

SESSION I OVERVIEW OF VECTOR–HOST–ENVIRONMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS

Moderator: Mary Wilson

9:30–10:15: Emerging vector-borne diseases in the United States: What is next, and are we prepared?

Lyle Petersen, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

10:15–11:00:

The past, present, and future of vector-borne plant diseases

Rodrigo Almeida, University of California, Berkeley

11:00–11:45:

Changing patterns of vector-borne diseases in animals domestically and globally

William Karesh, EcoHealth Alliance

11:45–12:30:

DISCUSSION

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×

12:301:15:

LUNCH

SESSION II THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE FOR VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES

Moderator: James M. Hughes

1:15–1:45: Arbovirus evolution, vector competence, and virulence models: Changing patterns of infection

Rebecca Rico-Hesse, Baylor College of Medicine

1:45–2:15:

Vector-borne disease emergence and spread in the European Union

Jan Semenza, European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention

2:15–2:45:

Arbovirus disease surveillance capacity in the United States

James Hadler, Yale University

2:45–3:15:

BREAK

3:15–3:45:

Recent introductions and spread of dengue and chikungunya in the Caribbean and the Americas

Hal Margolis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

3:45–4:15:

The changing epidemiology and geographic spread of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease

James Maguire, Harvard Medical School

4:15–4:45:

Changing paradigms for tick-borne diseases in the Americas

Christopher Paddock, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

4:45–5:15:

Blood donation screening for vector-borne diseases

Susan Stramer, American Red Cross

5:15–6:00:

DISCUSSION

6:00:

ADJOURNMENT

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×

DAY TWO: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2014

8:30–9:00: Registration and continental breakfast

9:00–9:15:

Welcome and summary of day one: David Relman

SESSION III KEY FACTORS AND DRIVERS—CLIMATE, TRAVEL, LAND USE, TRANSPORTATION, AND TRADE

Moderator: Lonnie King

9:15–9:45: Recent weather extremes and impacts on agricultural production and vector-borne disease outbreak patterns

Ken Linthicum, U.S. Department of Agriculture

9:45–10:15:

Globalization, land use, global warming, and the invasion of West Nile virus

Marm Kilpatrick, University of California, Santa Cruz

10:15–10:45:

BREAK

10:45–11:15:

The impact of environmental factors on mosquito-parasite interactions

Matt Thomas, Pennsylvania State University

11:15–11:45:

Dengue, chikungunya, and malaria surveillance and response in Latin America and the Caribbean: The role of the Pan American Health Organization

Luis Gerardo Castellanos, Pan American Health Organization

11:45–12:30:

DISCUSSION

12:30–1:15:

LUNCH

SESSION IV NOVEL APPROACHES AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR VECTOR-BORNE DISEASE CONTROL

Moderator: Gerald Keusch

1:15–1:45: Why did Gorgas succeed? (And why have we failed?)

Paul Reiter, Institute Pasteur

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×

1:45–2:15:

Towards the diagnosis and prognosis of emerging vector-borne diseases

Barry Beaty, Colorado State University

2:15–2:45:

Malaria eradication strategies at the Gates Foundation

Alan Magill, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

2:45–3:00:

BREAK

3:00–3:30:

Development and evaluation of transgenic insects for use in the control of insect-borne disease

Luke Alphey, Pirbright Institute

3:30–4:00:

Exploiting the specificity of virus–vector interactions for new disease control strategies

Anna Whitfield, Kansas State University

4:00–4:30:

Dengue, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, chikungunya, and yellow fever: Challenges for the development and use of vaccines

Thomas Monath, Harvard Medical School

4:30–5:15:

DISCUSSION

5:15–5:30:

CLOSING REMARKS AND ADJOURNMENT

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
Page 347
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
Page 348
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
Page 349
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
Page 350
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Pathogens transmitted among humans, animals, or plants by insects and arthropod vectors have been responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout recorded history. Such vector-borne diseases – including malaria, dengue, yellow fever, and plague – together accounted for more human disease and death in the 17th through early 20th centuries than all other causes combined. Over the past three decades, previously controlled vector-borne diseases have resurged or reemerged in new geographic locations, and several newly identified pathogens and vectors have triggered disease outbreaks in plants and animals, including humans.

Domestic and international capabilities to detect, identify, and effectively respond to vector-borne diseases are limited. Few vaccines have been developed against vector-borne pathogens. At the same time, drug resistance has developed in vector-borne pathogens while their vectors are increasingly resistant to insecticide controls. Furthermore, the ranks of scientists trained to conduct research in key fields including medical entomology, vector ecology, and tropical medicine have dwindled, threatening prospects for addressing vector-borne diseases now and in the future.

In June 2007, as these circumstances became alarmingly apparent, the Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a workshop to explore the dynamic relationships among host, pathogen(s), vector(s), and ecosystems that characterize vector-borne diseases. Revisiting this topic in September 2014, the Forum organized a workshop to examine trends and patterns in the incidence and prevalence of vector-borne diseases in an increasingly interconnected and ecologically disturbed world, as well as recent developments to meet these dynamic threats. Participants examined the emergence and global movement of vector-borne diseases, research priorities for understanding their biology and ecology, and global preparedness for and progress toward their prevention, control, and mitigation. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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