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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
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Appendix C

Acronyms

AFHSC Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
APHIS Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
APHL Association of Public Health Laboratories

BTV

bluetongue virus

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CHIKV chikungunya virus

DDSS

Dengue Decision Support System

DDT dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane
DENV dengue virus
DF dengue fever
DHF dengue hemorrhagic fever
DSS dengue shock syndrome
DTP dengue transmission potential
DV dengue virus

ECDC

European Center for Disease Control

EIS Epidemic Intelligence Service
ENSO El Niño–Southern Oscillation

HAT

human African trypanosomiasis

HFRS hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
IOM Institute of Medicine
ITM insecticide-treated material
ITN insecticide-treated bed net
IVCC Innovative Vector Control Consortium

JEV

Japanese encephalitis virus

NIAID

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

NIH National Institutes of Health
NMCP National Malaria Control Programme

OIE

Office International des Epizooties

PAHO

Pan American Health Organization

PCR polymerase chain reaction
PD Pierce’s disease of grapevines

RIDL

release of insects carrying dominant lethal

RNA ribonucleic acid
RNAi RNA interference
rRT-PCR real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction
RVF Rift Valley fever
RVFV Rift Valley fever virus

SLE

St. Louis encephalitis

SLEV St. Louis encephalitis virus
SNV Sin Nombre virus
SOI Southern Oscillation Index
SST sea surface temperature
subsp. subspecies

TBE

tick-borne encephalitis

VBD

vector-borne disease

VEE Venezuelan equine encephalitis
VEEV Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus
VP viral structural protein

WHO

World Health Organization

WNV West Nile virus

YF

yellow fever

YFV yellow fever virus
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
Page 351
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21792.
×
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Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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Pathogens transmitted among humans, animals, or plants by insects and arthropod vectors have been responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout recorded history. Such vector-borne diseases – including malaria, dengue, yellow fever, and plague – together accounted for more human disease and death in the 17th through early 20th centuries than all other causes combined. Over the past three decades, previously controlled vector-borne diseases have resurged or reemerged in new geographic locations, and several newly identified pathogens and vectors have triggered disease outbreaks in plants and animals, including humans.

Domestic and international capabilities to detect, identify, and effectively respond to vector-borne diseases are limited. Few vaccines have been developed against vector-borne pathogens. At the same time, drug resistance has developed in vector-borne pathogens while their vectors are increasingly resistant to insecticide controls. Furthermore, the ranks of scientists trained to conduct research in key fields including medical entomology, vector ecology, and tropical medicine have dwindled, threatening prospects for addressing vector-borne diseases now and in the future.

In June 2007, as these circumstances became alarmingly apparent, the Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a workshop to explore the dynamic relationships among host, pathogen(s), vector(s), and ecosystems that characterize vector-borne diseases. Revisiting this topic in September 2014, the Forum organized a workshop to examine trends and patterns in the incidence and prevalence of vector-borne diseases in an increasingly interconnected and ecologically disturbed world, as well as recent developments to meet these dynamic threats. Participants examined the emergence and global movement of vector-borne diseases, research priorities for understanding their biology and ecology, and global preparedness for and progress toward their prevention, control, and mitigation. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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