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SBIR at NASA (2016)

Chapter: Appendix F: Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. SBIR at NASA. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21797.
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Appendix F

Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data

This appendix supplements Chapter 5 (Quantitative Outcomes) by providing additional data from the 2011 Survey.

The 2011 Survey asked about other potentially significant aspects of the company. Previous analysis of the SBIR program did not address a potentially important intervening variable: industry sector. It is quite possible that commercialization outcomes may be affected by the average cycle time of product development in different sectors. For example, product cycle time is much shorter in software than in materials or medical devices. Table F-1 shows the distribution of responses by Phase and sector.

This question was designed to provide an approximate map of activities by sector. There is considerable overlap between some categories, and respondents would have substantial leeway to define sectors differently, so these results should be viewed as highly preliminary.

A few key points emerge:

  • Aerospace-orientation. Seventy-eight percent of respondents indicated that the project was in aerospace.
  • Engineering driven. More than one-half of respondents indicated that the project was in engineering.
  • Defense. Twenty-nine percent of respondents indicated that the project was in defense-specific products and services.
  • Other sectors. Three other sectors each accounted for at least 20 percent of responses:
    • Sensors
    • Materials
    • Scientific instruments and measuring equipment
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. SBIR at NASA. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21797.
×

TABLE F-1 Distribution of Responses by Sector

Industry sector Percentage of Responses

Aerospace

78

Defense-specific products and services

29

Energy and the environment

18

- Sustainable energy production

5

- Energy storage and distribution

3

- Energy saving

2

- Other energy or environmental products and services

6

Engineering

55

- Engineering services

12

- Scientific instruments and measuring equipment

28

- Robotics

9

- Sensors

26

- Other engineering

5

Information technology

11

- Computers and peripheral equipment

2

- Telecommunications equipment and services

2

- Business and productivity software

1

- Data processing and database software and services

3

- Media products

2

- Other IT

1

Materials (including nanotechnology for materials)

25

Medical Technologies

3

- Pharmaceuticals

0

- Medical devices

7

- Other biotechnology products

3

- Other medical products and services

1

Other (please describe)

6

N = Number of Responses 178

NOTE: Bolded values emphasize major categories. Answers do not sum to 100 percent because more than one response is available.

SOURCE: 2011 Survey, Question 20.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. SBIR at NASA. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21797.
×
Page 337
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Annex 1 to Chapter 5: Supplemental 2011 Survey Data." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. SBIR at NASA. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21797.
×
Page 338
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The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program is one of the largest examples of U.S. public-private partnerships, and was established in 1982 to encourage small businesses to develop new processes and products and to provide quality research in support of the U.S. government’s many missions. The U.S. Congress tasked the National Research Council with undertaking a comprehensive study of how the SBIR program has stimulated technological innovation and used small businesses to meet federal research and development needs, and with recommending further improvements to the program. In the first round of this study, an ad hoc committee prepared a series of reports from 2004 to 2009 on the SBIR program at the five agencies responsible for 96 percent of the program’s operations -- including NASA. In a follow-up to the first round, NASA requested from the Academies an assessment focused on operational questions in order to identify further improvements to the program.

Public-private partnerships like SBIR are particularly important since today's knowledge economy is driven in large part by the nation's capacity to innovate. One of the defining features of the U.S. economy is a high level of entrepreneurial activity. Entrepreneurs in the United States see opportunities and are willing and able to assume risk to bring new welfare-enhancing, wealth-generating technologies to the market. Yet, although discoveries in various fields present new opportunities, converting these discoveries into innovations for the market involves substantial challenges. The American capacity for innovation can be strengthened by addressing the challenges faced by entrepreneurs.

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